Dr. Pranav Kumar Prabhakar, PhD - Lovely Professional University Punjab - Assistant Professor

Dr. Pranav Kumar Prabhakar

PhD

Lovely Professional University Punjab

Assistant Professor

Phagwara, Punjab | India

Main Specialties: Biotechnology, Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, Medical Microbiology, Pharmacology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0001-8130-1822


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Dr. Pranav Kumar Prabhakar, PhD - Lovely Professional University Punjab - Assistant Professor

Dr. Pranav Kumar Prabhakar

PhD

Introduction

Dr Pranav Kumar Prabhakar has received his PhD in Biotechnology from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, India during the period of 2011 and he has completed his master in biochemistry from Patna University Bihar, India in 2003. Currently, he is working as Assistant Professor in Lovely Professional University Punjab, India. He has successfully completed his Administrative responsibilities as research coordinator of the school. His research has included synergy, Phytomedicine, metabolic disorders. He is serving as an editorial member of several reputed journals like Bioinfo-Drug Targets, Journal of Pharmacy and Phytotherapeutics, Asian journal of Phytomedicine and clinical research, Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics & expert Reviewers for journals like Biofouling (Taylor & Fransis), Phytomedicine (Elsevier), Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (Elsevier), Journal of Applied Polymer Science (Wiley), Advances in Pharmacological Sciences (Hindawi), Journal of Microbial &Biochemical Technology (Omics). He have authored 25 research articles/books/ book chapters. He is a member of Royal Society of Chemistry and Asia-Pacific Chemical, Biological& Environmental Engineering Society (APCBEES).

Primary Affiliation: Lovely Professional University Punjab - Phagwara, Punjab , India

Specialties:


View Dr. Pranav Kumar Prabhakar’s Resume / CV

Education

Jul 2011
IIT Madras
Doctorate
Biotechnology
Sep 2003
PU Patna
Postgraduation
Biochemistry
Sep 1999
LNMU Darbhanga
Graduation
Chemistry
May 1996
BIEC Patna
Intermediate
May 1994
BSEB Patna
Matriculation

Experience

Aug 2011
Assistant Professor
Teaching Research
NA

Publications

16Publications

188Reads

61Profile Views

539PubMed Central Citations

Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B Inhibitors: A Novel Therapeutic Strategy for the Management of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Curr Pharm Des 2019 ;25(23):2526-2539

Center for Molecular Biology, Institute of Research and Development, Duy Tan University, 03 Quang Trung, Da Nang, Vietnam.

Diabetes is one of the most common endocrine non-communicable metabolic disorder which is mainly caused either due to insufficient insulin or inefficient insulin or both together and is characterized by hyperglycemia. Diabetes emerged as a serious health issue in the industrialized and developing country specially in the Asian pacific region. Out of two major categories of diabetes mellitus, type 2 diabetes is more prevalent, almost 90 to 95% cases, and the main cause of this is insulin resistance. The main cause of the progression of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been found to be insulin resistance. The type 2 diabetes mellitus may be managed by the change in lifestyle, physical activities, dietary modifications, and medications. The major currently available management strategies are sulfonylureas, biguanides, thiazolidinediones, ?-glucosidase inhibitors, dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist. Binding of insulin on the extracellular unit of insulin receptor sparks tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor and which induces autophosphorylation. The phosphorylation of the tyrosine is regulated by insulin and leptin molecules. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) works as a negative governor for the insulin signaling pathways, as it dephosphorylates the tyrosine of the insulin receptor and suppresses the insulin signaling cascade. The compounds or molecules which inhibit the negative regulation of PTP1B can have an inductive effect on the insulin pathway and finally helps in the management of diabetes mellitus. PTP1B could be an emerging therapeutic strategy for diabetes management. There are a number of clinical and basic research result suggest that induced expression of PTP1B reduces insulin resistance. In this current review, we briefly elaborate and explain the place of PTP1B and its significance in diabetes as well as a recent development in the PTP1B inhibitors as an antidiabetic therapy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612825666190716102901DOI Listing
April 2020
21 Reads
3.452 Impact Factor

Endogenous Repair System of Oxidative Damage of DNA

Current Chemical Biology (2019) 13: 110

Current Chemical Biology

DNA is one of the most important biomolecules of living cells which carries genetic information from generation to generation. Many endogenous and exogenous agents may disrupt the structure of DNA. Change in the cellular genome can lead to errors in replication, transcription and in protein synthesis. DNA damage occurs naturally or result from a metabolic and hydrolytic process which release some very active chemical entities like free radicals, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Reactive Nitrogen Intermediate (RNI), Reactive Carbonyl Species (RCS), lipid peroxidation products and alkylating agents. Superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide cause a significant threat to cellular integrity by damaging the DNA, lipids, proteins and other biomolecules. Oxidative stress may be explained as a disturbance in the number of free radicals and our system’s ability to neutralize these free radicals. Imbalances in the normal redox potential can also lead to toxic effects via the generation of peroxides. Oxidation of DNA bases leads to the base damage, nick in the strand and break in the strand either single or double strand. Oxidative stress can also cause modifications in normal mechanisms of cell signaling. DNA mutation can result in a number of genetic abnormalities such as cancer, heart failure, Alzheimer’s disease, and depression. Human body has special protection in the form of antioxidant molecules and enzymes against these free radicals. Generation of ROS and its neutralization must be regulated to protect cells and signalling biomolecules from the deleterious effect of oxidative stress with the involvement of antioxidant systems, enzymes, and specific proteins. DNA repair system is a complex system which helps in the identification, removal of the wrong nucleotide and repairs them and as a result, the cell will produce correct and functional protein and active enzyme.

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February 2019
6 Reads

Nanoparticle-assisted therapeutic strategies for effective cancer management

http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573413715666190206151757

Current Nanoscience

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide. There are various classes of medications available for the management of cancer. Nanoparticles based drugs are the most preferred category among them due to their specificity towards target and reduction in the dose of drugs. Nanotechnology includes multiple subdisciplines like nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These nanostructure-based drugs have gained extrusion in the medical field because of their small size, shape and high pharmacological efficacy. Nanomedicine is a booming field involving the use of different types of nanoparticles to kill tumor and tumorous cells. Biodegradable nanometersized particles have novel structural and physical properties that are attracting great interests from pharmaceuticals for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. These nanoparticles are designed to increase more uptake of drugs or therapeutic genes into cancerous cells while noncancerous cells are intact. In this review, different nanomaterials-based strategies for a safe, fast, effective and targeted delivery system for drugs are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities.

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February 2019

Impact Factor 1.586

3 Reads

Hybrid drug combination: Combination of ferulic acid and metformin as anti-diabetic therapy.

Phytomedicine 2017 Dec 24;37:10-13. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Bioengineering and Drug Design Lab, Department of Biotechnology, IIT Madras, Chennai 600036, India. Electronic address:

Background And Purpose: Ferulic acid, an anti-oxidant phytochemical present in several dietary components, is known to produce wide range of pharmacological effects. It is approved for use in food industry as a preservative and in sports food. Previous reports from our lab have shown synergistic interaction of ferulic acid with metformin in cell lines and diabetic rats. The purpose of this review is to compile information about anti-diabetic activity of ferulic acid in in vitro and in vivo models with special emphasis on activity of ferulic acid when combined with metformin. The mechanism of synergistic interaction between ferulic acid and metformin is also proposed after carefully studying effects of these compounds on molecules involved in glucose metabolism.

Methods: Scientific literature for the purpose of this review was collected using online search engines and databases such as ScienceDirect, Scopus, PubMed and Google scholar.

Results: Ferulic acid forms resonance stabilized phenoxyl radical which scavenges free radicals and reduce oxidative stress. It improves glucose and lipid profile in diabetic rats by enhancing activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the pancreatic tissue. Combining ferulic acid with metformin improves both, in vitro glucose uptake activity and in vivo hypoglycemic activity of the latter. It is possible to reduce the dose of metformin by four folds (from 50 to 12.5?mg/kg body weight) by combining it with 10?mg of ferulic acid/kg body weight in diabetic rats. Ferulic acid improves glucose uptake through PI3-K pathway whereas metformin activates AMPK pathway to improve glucose uptake.

Conclusion: The synergistic interaction of ferulic acid and metformin is due their action on parallel pathways which are involved in glucose uptake. Due to synergistic nature of their interaction, it is possible to reduce the dose of metformin (by combining with ferulic acid) required to achieve normoglycemia. Since the dose of metformin is reduced, the dose associated side effects of metformin therapy can be reduced.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2017.10.015DOI Listing
December 2017
29 Reads
16 Citations
4.180 Impact Factor

Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

Journal of Applied Physics. 2014, 115 (12), 124906-1-4.

Journal of Applied Physics

The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

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March 2014

4 Citations

Impact Factor 2.170

1 Read

Combination therapy: A new strategy to manage diabetes and its complications

Phytomedicine, 2014, 21 (2), 123-130

Phytomedicine

Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder. The major cause of mortality and morbidity here is due to the complications caused by increased glucose concentrations. All the available commercial antidiabetic drugs are associated with side effects. The combination therapy could be a new and highly effective therapeutic strategy to manage hyperglycemia. Combination of commercial drugs with phytochemicals may reduce the side effects caused by these synthetic drugs. Herbal products have been thought to be inherently safe, because of their natural origin and traditional use rather than based on systemic studies. New formulation and cocrystallisation strategies need to be adopted to match the bioavailability of the drug and the phytochemical. This review describes in detail, the observed synergy and mechanism of action between phytochemicals and synthetic drugs in effectively combating. The mode of action of combination differs significantly than that of the drugs alone; hence isolating a single component may lose its importance thereby simplifying the task of pharma industries.

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84892919148&partnerID=MN8TOARS

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February 2014

39 Citations

Impact Factor 4.180

8 Reads

Synergistic interaction of ferulic acid with commercial hypoglycemic drugs in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

Phytomedicine 2013 Apr 13;20(6):488-94. Epub 2013 Mar 13.

Lovely Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, LPU, Phagwara 144402, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2012.12.004DOI Listing
April 2013
16 Reads
4 Citations
3.130 Impact Factor

Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with commercial hypoglycemic drugs on 2-deoxyglucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

J Agric Food Chem 2011 Sep 6;59(18):9835-44. Epub 2011 Sep 6.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf2015717DOI Listing
September 2011
8 Reads
3 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Mechanism of action of natural products used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

Chin J Integr Med 2011 Aug 9;17(8):563-74. Epub 2011 Aug 9.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India.

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder caused by insufficient or inefficient insulin secretary response and it is characterized by increased blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia). DM is a heterogonous group of syndromes. Glucose is the main energy source for the body, and in the case of DM, management of glucose becomes irregular. There are three key defects in the onset of hyperglycemia in DM, namely increased hepatic glucose production, diminished insulin secretion, and impaired insulin action. Conventional drugs treat diabetes by improving insulin sensitivity, increasing insulin production and/or decreasing the amount of glucose in blood. This article provides a comprehensive review of the mode of action of most popular hypoglycemic herbs, such as ginseng, bitter melon, fenugreek, banaba, Gymnema sylvestre and Coptis chinensis. The herbs act by increasing insulin secretion, enhancing glucose uptake by adipose and skeletal muscle tissues, inhibiting intestinal glucose absorption and inhibiting hepatic glucose production. Although evidence from animals and humans consistently supports the therapeutic effect of these phytomedicines, multicenter large-scale clinical trials have not been conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of these herbal medicines and their interaction with conventional drugs when administered simultaneously.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11655-011-0810-3DOI Listing
August 2011
2 Reads
144 Citations
1.401 Impact Factor

Biocompatibility studies on polyaniline and polyaniline-silver nanoparticle coated polyurethane composite.

Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 2011 Aug 1;86(1):146-53. Epub 2011 Apr 1.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2011.03.033DOI Listing
August 2011
62 Reads
8 Citations
4.152 Impact Factor

Effect of Natural Products on Commercial Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Enhancing 2-Deoxyglucose Uptake by 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

Ther Adv Endocrinol Metab 2011 Jun;2(3):103-14

Bhupat and Jyoti Mehta School of Biosciences, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India.

Objective: The management of diabetes with insulin and synthetic oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHDs) can produce serious side effects and in addition fails to prevent diabetes-related complications in many patients. A new diabetes management strategy is needed that is more effective and has fewer side effects.

Methods: This paper analyzes the dose- and time-dependent effect of three phytochemicals: berberine, arecoline and vanillic acid, and two antidiabetic drugs: 2,4-thiazolidinedione (TZD) and metformin, on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) by 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The interactions of the phytochemicals with the OHDs were analyzed with isobolograms and the combination index.

Results: TZD and berberine increased 2DG uptake by 3.3-fold (with respect to control) at 15 ?M and 25 ?M, respectively. The same concentrations of arecoline and vanillic acid increased 2DG uptake by 3.2-and 2.9-fold, respectively, when compared with the basal level. Berberine and arecoline acted synergistically with both the OHDs, whereas vanillic acid had an additive interaction with TZD and an antagonistic interaction with metformin. Arecoline significantly increased the translocation of GLUT4 via the PPAR(?) pathway, whereas berberine and vanillic acid did this via the AMPK-dependent pathway.

Conclusions: These phytochemicals significantly reduced the expression of the enzymes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis, indicating that they might help prevent the secondary complications of diabetes. The current study suggests that berberine and arecoline could allow dosage reduction of OHDs, which could also lead to a reduction in the toxicity and side effects caused by OHDs.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2042018811411356DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3474633PMC
June 2011
19 Reads
25 Citations
3.980 Impact Factor

Interaction of phytochemicals with hypoglycemic drugs on glucose uptake in L6 myotubes.

Phytomedicine 2011 Feb 19;18(4):285-91. Epub 2010 Aug 19.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

The present study analyses the effect of eugenol, arecoline and vanillic acid alone and in combination with two oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), namely, metformin and 2,4-thiazolodinedione (THZ), on 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in L6 myotubes. 2DG uptake in L6 myotubes was determined using an enzymatic assay developed by Yamamoto et al. (2006). Lipid content inside the cells has been estimated with oil red O assay. The absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and drug likeness properties of these phytochemicals are estimated using software QikProp(®). All the three phytochemicals enhance 2DG uptake both in time- and dose-dependent manner. Eugenol and arecoline enhances 2DG uptake synergistically with both the OHD; whereas vanillic acid showing partly synergy with THZ and antagonistic activity with metformin on 2DG uptake. Eugenol and arecoline significantly increase the expressions of the glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) genes, but not the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma. Whereas vanillic acid does not has any significant effect on the expressions of these genes, the ADME results indicate that these phytochemicals are satisfying all the conditions to have a good oral bioavailability. These findings suggest that these phytochemicals can replace the commercial drugs in part, which could lead to a reduction in toxicity and side effects caused by the later as well as reduce the secondary complications.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2010.06.016DOI Listing
February 2011
4 Reads
33 Citations
4.180 Impact Factor

Synthesis, antioxidant evaluation and quantitative structure activity relationship studies of chalcones

Medicinal Chemistry Research. 2011, 20(4), 482-492

Synthesis, antioxidant activity, and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of 25 of chalcone derivatives is reported here. They were synthesized by Claisen–Schmidt reaction and were characterized by FTIR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. Antioxidant activity is evaluated through four different methods namely, superoxide radical-scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, reducing power, and DPPH radical-scavenging assays. Generally, compounds with –SCH3 and –OCH3 in the para position of the A-ring and –OH in the B-ring were more active than others. In few cases, some of the compounds were more active than ascorbic acid or butylated hydroxytoluene. QSAR was developed correlating the antioxidant activity with the structural features of the compounds and the predictive capability of the models was estimated using internal and external validation methods. All the predictions were within the 99% confidence level. Spatial, structural, and lipophilic properties of the compounds determine their antioxidant properties.

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March 2010

114 Citations

Impact Factor 1.610

1 Read

Synergistic effect of phytochemicals in combination with hypoglycemic drugs on glucose uptake in myotubes.

Phytomedicine 2009 Dec 6;16(12):1119-26. Epub 2009 Aug 6.

Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phymed.2009.05.021DOI Listing
December 2009
10 Reads
17 Citations
3.130 Impact Factor

A target based therapeutic approach towards diabetes mellitus using medicinal plants

Current Diabetes Review. 2008, 4 (4), 291-308.

Current Diabetes Review

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is not one disease but is a heterogonous group of syndromes. Contrary to the popular belief DM is a metabolic disorder characterized by increased blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and this is because of insufficient or inefficient insulin secretary response. Glucose is the main energy source for the body, and in the case of DM, management of glucose becomes irregular. There are around 410 experimentally proven medicinal plants having antidiabetic properties but the complete mechanism of action is available only for about 109. There are several medicinal plants whose extract modulate glycolysis, Krebs cycle, gluconeogenesis, HMP shunt pathway, glycogen synthesis and their degradation, cholesterol synthesis, metabolism and absorption of carbohydrates, and synthesis and release of insulin. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the mode of action of medicinal plants that exhibit anti-diabetic properties.

http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-59849103075&partnerID=MN8TOARS

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February 2008

132 Citations

124 Reads

Top co-authors

Mukesh Doble
Mukesh Doble

Indian Institute of Technology Madras

8
Rakesh Nankar
Rakesh Nankar

Bioengineering and Drug Design Lab

1
Narendra Kumar Pandey
Narendra Kumar Pandey

a School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

1
Ram Prasad
Ram Prasad

Mahatma Gandhi Central University

1
Shilpa N Sawant
Shilpa N Sawant

Indian Institute of Technology Madras

1
Shakir Ali
Shakir Ali

Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University)

1