Publications by authors named "Pradipta R Muduli"

7 Publications

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Responses of phytoplankton community structure and association to variability in environmental drivers in a tropical coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2021 Apr 1;783:146873. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon 752030, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

Spatial and seasonal heterogeneity in phytoplankton communities are governed by many biotic and abiotic drivers. However, the identification of long-term spatial and temporal trends in abiotic drivers, and their interdependencies with the phytoplankton communities' structure is understudied in tropical brackish coastal lagoons. We examined phytoplankton communities' spatiotemporal dynamics from a 5-year dataset (n = 780) collected from 13 sampling stations in Chilika Lagoon, India, where the salinity gradient defined the spatial patterns in environmental variables. Generalized additive models showed a declining trend in phytoplankton biomass, pH, and dissolved PO in the lagoon. Hierarchical modelling of species communities revealed that salinity (44.48 ± 28.19%), water temperature (4.37 ± 5.65%), and season (4.27 ± 0.96%) accounted for maximum variation in the phytoplankton composition. Bacillariophyta (Indicator Value (IV): 0.74) and Dinophyta (IV: 0.72) emerged as top indicators for polyhaline regime whereas, Cyanophyta (IV: 0.81), Euglenophyta (IV: 0.79), and Chlorophyta (IV: 0.75) were strong indicators for oligohaline regime. The responses of Dinophyta and Chrysophyta to environmental drivers were much more complex as random effects accounted for ~70-75% variation in their abundances. Prorocentrum minimum (IV: 0.52), Gonyaulax sp. (IV: 0.52), and Alexandrium sp. (IV: 0.51) were potential indicators of P-limitation. Diploneis weissflogii (IV: 0.43), a marine diatom, emerged as a potential indicator of N-limitation. Hierarchical modelling revealed the positive association between Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta whereas, Dinophyta and Chrysophyta showed a negative association with Cyanophyta, Chlorophyta, and Euglenophyta. Landsat 8-Operational Land Imager satellite models predicted the highest and lowest Cyanophyta abundances in northern and southern sectors, respectively, which were in accordance with the near-coincident field-based measurements from the lagoon. This study highlighted the dynamics of phytoplankton communities and their relationships with environmental drivers by separating the signals of habitat filtering and biotic interactions in a monsoon-regulated tropical coastal lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.146873DOI Listing
April 2021

Landfall season is critical to the impact of a cyclone on a monsoon-regulated tropical coastal lagoon.

Sci Total Environ 2021 May 20;770:145235. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Balugaon, Odisha, India.

Cyclones can produce a wide variety of short-term and long-term ecological impacts on coastal lagoons depending on cyclone's physical-meteorological characteristics and the lagoon's geographic, geomorphic, and bathymetric characteristics. Here, we theorized that in monsoon regulated tropical coastal lagoons, another important factor that could determine the impact of a cyclone is the landfall season or time of the year with reference to the monsoon season. We analyzed the impact of two cyclones which made landfall near Chilika, Asia's largest brackish water lagoon in different seasons, Cyclone Fani and Titli before and after the monsoon season. We compared field measured and satellite-derived water quality parameters including nutrient, salinity, water temperature, transparency, Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), total suspended matter (TSM), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) before and after the cyclones. We found that although both the cyclones were of similar intensities, after their land interaction, their impact on the lagoon's water quality was contrasting. The post-monsoon cyclone produced a substantial increase in total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP), a large drop in salinity, CDOM, and Chl-a. In contrast, after the pre-monsoon cyclone, TN and TP did not show any such hike, no substantial change in salinity and CDOM either, and only a slight increase in Chl-a was observed. We found that the controlling factor in determining the impact of a cyclone is the rate and duration of freshwater discharge to the lagoon, which is normally a strong pulse for pre-monsoon and a continued high flow for post-monsoon cyclones. We conclude that the antecedent conditions of the lagoon and the watershed at the time of a cyclone's landfall is a key criterion in determining the impact. The combined use of satellite data and field data was proved critical to capture the overall impact of cyclones on the hydrological characteristics of the monsoon-regulated coastal lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.145235DOI Listing
May 2021

Bioavailable dissolved organic matter and its spatio-temporal variation in a river dominated tropical brackish water Lagoon, India.

Mar Pollut Bull 2018 Jun 27;131(Pt A):460-467. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

NCSCM, Ministry of Environment, Forests and Climate Change, Anna University Campus, Chennai, India.

Bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (B), nitrogen (B) and their degradation rate constants were measured for the Chilika Lagoon, India. Long-term laboratory incubation experiments (90 days) were conducted at a constant temperature (25 °C) to quantify the bioavailable dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the possible degradation rate coefficients. The results showed that 41 ± 12% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and 47 ± 17% of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) were B and B respectively, with their stoichiometry found to be higher than the Redfield ratio. A first order exponential non-linear fitting routine was used to estimate pool sizes. The degradation rate constant (k) for the B varied from 0.127-0.329 d and B from 0.043-0.306 d during the study period. Half-lives of the B and B ranged from 2.1-5.4 and 2.2-15.9 days, respectively. Overall, the results showed that a fraction of the labile DON was transported from the lagoon to the adjacent coastal sea.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.04.059DOI Listing
June 2018

Spatial distribution and potential biological risk of some metals in relation to granulometric content in core sediments from Chilika Lake, India.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 Jan 19;25(1):572-587. Epub 2017 Oct 19.

ICAR-Central Inland Fisheries Research Institute, Barrackpore, Kolkata, 700120, India.

The article presents first systematic report on the concentration of selected major elements [iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn)] and minor elements [zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co)] from the core sediment of Chilika Lake, India. The analyzed samples revealed higher content of Pb than the background levels in the entire study area. The extent of contamination from minor and major elements is expressed by assessing (i) the metal enrichments in the sediment through the calculations of anthropogenic factor (AF), pollution load index (PLI), Enrichment factor (EF), and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) and (ii) potential biological risks by the use of sediment quality guidelines like effect range median (ERM) and effect range low (ERL) benchmarks. The estimated indices indicated that sediment is enriched with Pb, Ni, Cr, Cu and Co. The enrichment of these elements seems to be due to the fine granulometric characteristics of the sediment with Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides being the main metal carriers and fishing boats using low grade paints, fuel, and fishing technology using lead beads fixed to fishing nets. Trace element input to the Chilika lake needs to be monitored with due emphasis on Cr and Pb contaminations since the ERM and ERL benchmarks indicated potential biological risk with these metals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-017-0421-4DOI Listing
January 2018

Sources and Variability of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Residues in Sediments of Chilika Lagoon, East Coast of India.

Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 2017 Jul 14;99(1):100-107. Epub 2017 Mar 14.

Wetland Research and Training Center, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Khurda, Odisha, 752030, India.

The spatio-temporal distribution and the controlling factors of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) in sediments of Chilika lagoon was investigated. Samples were collected during three seasons and quantified using UV-fluorescence spectroscopy. Concentrations of PHCs in surface sediments varies from 0.18 to 12.13 ppm (mean 3.71 ± 3.94 ppm). Compared to the lagoon, the monitoring stations adjacent to jetties with high boating activities tend to have higher PHC concentrations, suggesting that the contribution is likely to be from fossil fuel combustion and accidental seepage. The sediment organic matter (OM) of Chilika ranges from 0.26% to 6.23%. PHC maintains a positive correlation with OM (p < 0.05; f = 0.334), indicating the long term deposition of PHC as sediment OM. However, there is no significant relation between PHC and sediment texture, indicating its negligible control over PHC. The recorded PHC concentrations are below the threshold limit (70 ppm) as classified by United States (US) National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and also lower than those reported from similar ecosystems in India and overseas. Since the long term deposition and the bioaccumulation of PHC cannot be avoided, it is essential to monitor these parameters periodically.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00128-017-2057-yDOI Listing
July 2017

Interannual and cyclone-driven variability in phytoplankton communities of a tropical coastal lagoon.

Mar Pollut Bull 2015 Dec 21;101(1):39-52. Epub 2015 Nov 21.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Balugaon 751014, Odisha, India. Electronic address:

One of the main challenges in phytoplankton ecology is to understand their variability at different spatiotemporal scales. We investigated the interannual and cyclone-derived variability in phytoplankton communities of Chilika, the largest tropical coastal lagoon in Asia and the underlying mechanisms in relation to environmental forcing. Between July 2012 and June 2013, Cyanophyta were most prolific in freshwater northern region of the lagoon. A category-5 very severe cyclonic storm (VSCS) Phailin struck the lagoon on 12th October 2013 and introduced additional variability into the hydrology and phytoplankton communities. Freshwater Cyanophyta further expanded their territory and occupied the northern as well as central region of the lagoon. Satellite remote sensing imagery revealed that the phytoplankton biomass did not change much due to high turbidity prevailing in the lagoon after Phailin. Modeling analysis of species-salinity relationship identified specific responses of phytoplankton taxa to the different salinity regime of lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2015.11.030DOI Listing
December 2015

Spatiotemporal distribution and composition of phytoplankton assemblages in a coastal tropical lagoon: Chilika, India.

Environ Monit Assess 2015 Feb 1;187(2):47. Epub 2015 Feb 1.

Wetland Research and Training Centre, Chilika Development Authority, Barkul, Balugaon, Odisha, 752030, India.

The Asia's largest lagoon, Chilika, is a shallow water estuary and a designated "Ramsar" site located in the east coast of India. The spatiotemporal diversity of phytoplankton based on the monthly sampling between July 2011 and June 2012 was investigated in relation to physicochemical variables of the surface water column from 13 stations. The salinity was minimum (average 9) during the monsoon which was primarily due to riverine discharge. As the season progressed towards post-monsoon, average salinity of the whole lagoon reached to 10 which further increased to 20 during pre-monsoon season. A total of 259 species of phytoplankton, mostly dominated by the Bacillariophyta (138 species) followed by Dinophyta (38 species), Chlorophyta (32 species), Cyanophyta (29 species), Euglenophyta (18 species), and Chrysophyta (4 species), were recorded in this study. Different ecological sectors of the lagoon (except the northern sector) were dominated by diatoms, while the northern sector due to its freshwater regime supported large population of euglenoids. Based on the multivariate ordination analysis, salinity regime and light availability played important role in determining the distribution, diversity, and composition of phytoplankton communities. Overall, this study documented a very high diversity of phytoplankton and highlighted the importance of taking extensive sampling in getting a clearer understanding of phytoplankton community structure in less-studied environments such as Chilika lagoon.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-014-4212-9DOI Listing
February 2015