Publications by authors named "Poramate Pitak-Arnnop"

75 Publications

An approach to a repeated self-biting tongue injury in a toddler.

Arch Pediatr 2021 Sep 8. Epub 2021 Sep 8.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg UKGM GmbH, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg 35043, Germany.

Background: Children with tongue injuries often visit the pediatric emergency department. The vast majority of cases can be conservatively treated, while some injuries require operative repair. The aim of this article was to demonstrate a "back-to-basics" approach to a refractory bifid tongue injury in a toddler.

Case Description: A 1-year-old toddler with a tongue injury was unsuccessfully treated three times within a week by a surgeon in another specialty; all reconstructions were mucosal only. The case was then referred to our maxillofacial unit for proper management. On examination, the recurrent injury seemed to occur because of the patient's self-biting habit. We performed the fourth reconstruction of the tongue muscles and mucosa, and because of no dental prosthetic laboratory available in our hospital, we used transparent adhesive drapes fixed by resorbable sutures to cover the patient's anterior teeth instead of bite guards. The toddler was fed via a nasogastric tube for 1 week under 2-day antibiotic prophylaxis and routine oral care. The patient was discharged without any complications 1 week later.

Conclusions And Practical Implications: The causes of repeated orofacial injuries should be identified and require particular attention to establish a proper treatment. For intraoral injuries in pediatric patients, self-biting habits should not be overlooked. The application of materials in an operating theater can help the treating clinicians improve the treatment outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arcped.2021.08.006DOI Listing
September 2021

Are oral lichen planus patients at high risk of hepatitis C? A case-control study.

J Stomatol Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Jul 28. Epub 2021 Jul 28.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Objective: To assess the correlation between oral lichen planus (OLP) and viral hepatitis C (HCV).

Methods: This retrospective case-control study included a sample of OLP patients in a 3-year interval. The predictor variable was the presence of OLP (yes/no). The outcome variable was the diagnosis of HCV. Other study variables were grouped into demographic, anatomic, and clinical. Descriptive, bi- and multivariate statistics were computed with a significant level at P ≤ 0.05.

Results: The sample was composed of 237 OLP patients (38.8% females) with a mean age of 59.9 ± 17.8 years (range, 17-96), and 948 age- and gender-matched control individuals. The significant higher frequency of HCV was identified in OLP patients (frequency: 19.8% vs. 2.1%; adjusted matched odds ratio [mOR], 9.5; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.98 to 15.91; P < 0.0001; Pearson's Phi coefficient [r], 0.307). In the adjusted model, OLP with HCV was associated with 1) oro-cutaneous manifestations (mOR, 17.58; 95% CI, 1.92 to 161.26; P = 0.0059; Bayesian posterior probability of positive test [W], 96%), 2) any intraoral forms other than reticular/plaque-liked forms (mOR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.18; P < 0.0001; W, 52%), and 3) poor response to topical corticosteroids (mOR, 0.05; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.16; P < 0.0001; W, 88%).

Conclusions: OLP, especially oro-cutaneous disease or steroid-refractory OLP, are associated with an increased frequency of HCV. Not only HCV screening in OLP patients, but oral examination in HCV patients, are both recommended as primary preventive measures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jormas.2021.07.013DOI Listing
July 2021

Strategic planning for maxillofacial trauma and head and neck cancers during COVID-19 pandemic- December 2020 updated from Germany.

Am J Otolaryngol 2021 Jul-Aug;42(4):102932. Epub 2021 Jan 26.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2021.102932DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7835607PMC
June 2021

A German AWMF's S2e/realist synthesis and meta-narrative snapshot of craniomaxillofacial manifestations in COVID-19 patients: Rapid living update on 1 January 2021.

J Stomatol Oral Maxillofac Surg 2021 Jan 30. Epub 2021 Jan 30.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Campus Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Purposes: To execute a review answering the following question: "Among novel coronavirus disease (COVID19) patients, what are craniomaxillofacial (CMF) manifestations?" based on the RAMESES and the German Association of Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF)'s S2e guidelines.

Methods: We performed a realist synthesis and meta-narrative review extracting data in English, French, German and Thai from PubMed/Medline, Embase, Biomed Central, Cochrane Library, and Thai Journals Online, until 1 January 2021. The primary outcome variable was CMF manifestations grouped into 5 categories: (1) mouth and throat, (2) nose, paranasal sinus, and skull base (3) ocular/orbital and periorbital tissue, (4) ear, and (5) craniofacial skin. Appropriate statistics was computed.

Results: Thirty-seven original articles meeting the inclusion criteria were analysed; all were in English and indexed in PubMed/Medline. Hand searches of their references yielded a total of 101 articles for the review. Most data were in low level of evidence and focused on smell and taste disturbances and non-specific orofacial lesions. Iatrogenic complications may occur in this body region. Conservative measures remained effective and were usually enough for patient care.

Conclusion: Because SARS-CoV-2 infection is new and becomes the stringent worldwide pandemic within a short time period, most of the data on CMF symptoms are of low level evidence. Apart from taste and smell dysfunctions, non-specific CMF lesions can be found and treated conservatively. Treatment complications are possible. Dentists and CMF surgeons are privileged to examine the orofacial region and work closely with colleagues in other specialities to combat this pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jormas.2021.01.012DOI Listing
January 2021

Factors associated with epiphora following orbital-sparing maxillectomy via modified Weber-Ferguson incision with lower blepharoplasty.

J Surg Oncol 2021 Apr 1;123(5):1246-1252. Epub 2021 Feb 1.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Campus Marburg, UKGM GmbH, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.

Purpose: The aims of the study were to estimate the frequency of epiphora and to identify factors associated with epiphora after orbital-sparing maxillectomy via modified Weber-Ferguson incision with lower blepharoplasty (OSOSM-MWFILB).

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study enrolling a sample derived from the patient population undergoing OSM-MWFILB over a 7-year period. The predictor variables were grouped into demographic, related health status, anatomic, tumor-specific, and therapeutic categories. The primary outcome variable was the presence of postmaxillectomy epiphora (PME). Descriptive, univariate, and multivariate regression mixed-effect models were computed.

Results: The study sample was composed of 134 patients (46.3% females; 71.6% squamous cell carcinomas) with a mean age of 64.7 ± 12.2 years. There were 23 (17.2%) PME events, which were significantly associated with eight variables: male gender, poor general health (ASA III-IV), large vertical defect (Brown and Shaw's class III-IV), squamous cell carcinoma tumor type, big tumor size (T3-4), cervical lymph node metastasis (N1-2), long operating time > 3 h, and adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy in both univariate mixed regression and multivariate Cox hazards analyses. Healing of PME in irradiated patients was significantly delayed.

Conclusions: Ophthalmologic consequences in patients undergoing OSM-MWFILB require particular attention, especially in case of advanced tumors, multiple comorbidities, or long surgery with postoperative radio(chemo)therapy. This emphasizes the importance of appropriate cooperation between the surgeons and ophthalmic colleagues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.26408DOI Listing
April 2021

Causal drugs and therapeutic measures for medication-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws-Data from German practice guideline.

Br J Clin Pharmacol 2021 Jul 27;87(7):3016-3018. Epub 2020 Dec 27.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bcp.14706DOI Listing
July 2021

An invited commentary on: "Safety and efficacy of Lactobacillus for preventing necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants: A systematic review and meta-analysis" [Int. J. Surg. (2020); Epub ahead of print].

Int J Surg 2020 05 19;77:36-37. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Division of Plastic, Reconstructive, Aesthetic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Trauma Department, Ortenau Medical Centre - Academic Teaching Hospital of Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg, Offenburg, Germany; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany; Formerly, Laboratory of Medical Ethics and Legal Medicine, Doctorate School of Law and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University Paris Descartes (Paris V), Paris, France; Formerly, Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, AP-HP Pitié Salpêtrière University Hospital, University Pierre and Marie Curie (Paris VI), Paris, France. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijsu.2020.03.021DOI Listing
May 2020

Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw - Personal comments.

Am J Otolaryngol 2018 Nov - Dec;39(6):802. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sana Klinikum Offenbach - Teaching Hospital of Medical Faculty, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Frankfurt am Main, Offenbach am Main, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2018.07.021DOI Listing
June 2019

Nasal appearance after secondary cleft rhinoplasty: comparison of professional rating with patient satisfaction.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016 Jun 22;20(2):195-201. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare professional rating and patient satisfaction of nasal appearance after secondary cleft rhinoplasty.

Method: We used a cross-sectional study design and enrolled German adults with nonsyndromic unilateral or bilateral cleft lip and/or palate (UCLP and BCLP, respectively) undergoing secondary cleft rhinoplasty from January 2001 to December 2013. The predictor variable was professional rating. The outcome variable was patient satisfaction with postoperative nasal aesthetics. Other study variables included patient age and gender, type of surgery, and patient rating of nasal function. Appropriate descriptive and univariate statistics were computed, and a P value of <0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by the use of Cohen's kappa coefficient.

Results: The study sample consisted of 242 adult cleft patients of mean age of 22.1 ± 9.2 years (range 14-64), including 97 females (40 %) and 176 unilateral clefts (73 %). Most of the patients reported good function (82 %) and good aesthetics (74 %). The main professional rating was good aesthetics (65 %). Analysis of inter-observer reliability revealed significant differences between patient satisfaction and professional assessment (κ = 0.385; P < 0.0001).

Conclusions: Although most of the patients were satisfied with the functional and aesthetic results of secondary cleft rhinoplasty, patient self-assessment of nasal appearance differed from professional assessment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-016-0555-4DOI Listing
June 2016

Factors affecting scientific productivity of German oral-maxillofacial surgery training centers: a retrospective cohort study.

Oral Maxillofac Surg 2015 Sep 25;19(3):259-65. Epub 2015 Feb 25.

Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany,

Purpose: To identify factors associated with scientific productivity (SP) of German oral-maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) training centers.

Materials And Methods: This retrospective cohort study was composed of a set of data from German OMFS training centers. A total of eight predictor variables were grouped into demographic, structural, and personal categories. The outcome variables were average publications in 2013 per senior staff, and percentage of OMFS trainees with >1 publications. Descriptive and univariate statistics were computed using P < 0.05.

Results: The sample included outputs from 62 OMFS departments (34 [54.8 %] university-based; 46 [74.2 %] in large cities). Average publications were 2.4 ± 3 per senior staff (range, 0-27), and 160 trainees (31.7 %) published >1 papers. The number of publications and productive trainees was not linked to department name and number of female senior staffs, but publication count was significantly increased when the hospital was in a metropolis (P = 0.018) or university-based (P < 0.0001), the OMFS' chairperson and >3 staffs within the department had a postdoctoral degree (German "Habilitation") (P = 0.013 and <0.0001), and the chairperson had h-index >10 or the first/last authorship in 2013 (P < 0.0001). Female senior surgeons were less scientifically productive than the male ones (P = 0.01).

Conclusion: SP of German OMFS training centers is greatly different across the country and influenced by city size, university base, educational backgrounds, and research activities of chairpersons and senior staffs. This helps students, trainees, and young surgeons to reach the career choice that is personally appropriate. The involved organizations may need to encourage research output of less productive surgeons/centers. Increasing postdoctoral-qualified staffs will increase SP of the department.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10006-015-0489-2DOI Listing
September 2015

Orotracheal tube-associated pressure ulcer of the lower lip in rhinoplasty patients: personal comments.

J Craniofac Surg 2014 Sep;25(5):1926

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, and Faculty of Medicine Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000000896DOI Listing
September 2014

Position paper from the IBRA Symposium on Surgery of the Head--the 2nd International Symposium for Condylar Fracture Osteosynthesis, Marseille, France 2012.

J Craniomaxillofac Surg 2014 Oct 29;42(7):1234-49. Epub 2014 Mar 29.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (Head and Chair: Prof. Andreas Neff), UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.

Background: This is a position paper from the 2nd International Bone Research Association (IBRA) Symposium for Condylar Fracture Osteosynthesis 2012 was held at Marseille, succeeding the first congress in Strasbourg, France, in 2007. The goal of this IBRA symposium and this paper was to evaluate current trends and potential changes of treatment strategies for mandibular condylar fractures, which remain controversial over the past decades.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, we enrolled the consensus based on the panel of experts and participants in the IBRA Symposium 2012. The outcomes of interest were the panel and electronic votes on management of condylar base, neck and head fractures, and panel votes on endoscopic and paediatric condylar fractures. Appropriate descriptive and univariate statistics were used.

Results: The consensus derived from 14 experts and 41 participant surgeons, using 12 case scenarios and 27 statements. The experts and participants had similar decision on the treatment of condylar base, neck and head fractures, as well as similar opinion on complications of condylar fracture osteosynthesis. They had a parallel agreement on using open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) as treatment of choice for condylar base and neck fractures in adults. Endoscopic approaches should be considered for selected cases, such as condylar base fractures with lateral displacement. There was also a growing tendency to perform ORIF in condylar head fractures. The experts also agreed to treat children (>12 years old) in the same way as adults and to consider open reduction in severely displaced and dislocated fractures even in younger children. Nevertheless, non-surgical treatment should be the first choice for children <6 years of age. The decision to perform surgery in children was based on factors influencing facial growth, appropriate age for ORIF, and disagreement to use resorbable materials in children.

Conclusions: The experts and participating surgeons had comparable opinion on management of condylar fractures and complications of ORIF. Compared to the first Condylar Fracture Symposium 2007 in Strasbourg, ORIF may now be considered as the gold standard for both condylar base and neck fractures with displacement and dislocation. Although ORIF in condylar head fractures in adults and condylar fractures in children with mixed dentition is highly recommended, but this recommendation requires further investigations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcms.2014.03.005DOI Listing
October 2014

Unhealed tooth extraction wound in a breast cancer patient.

Presse Med 2014 Sep 9;43(9):1024-5. Epub 2014 May 9.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lpm.2014.01.016DOI Listing
September 2014

Grand rounds: Eyelid swelling after nose blowing.

Am J Otolaryngol 2014 May-Jun;35(3):456-9. Epub 2014 Feb 3.

Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2014.01.007DOI Listing
December 2014

The 100 most cited articles in dentistry--some discussions.

Clin Oral Investig 2014 8;18(2):683-4. Epub 2014 Jan 8.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-013-1171-4DOI Listing
February 2016

Is radiotherapy necessary for pleomorphic adenoma?

Am J Otolaryngol 2014 Mar-Apr;35(2):276-7. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Research Group for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjoto.2013.08.023DOI Listing
November 2014

Radiofrequency: the next step for gingival depigmentation.

J Cutan Aesthet Surg 2013 Jan;6(1):57-9

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany. E-mail:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0974-2077.110103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663183PMC
January 2013

Ethical dilemma: Dental patient with HIV.

Niger Med J 2012 Jul;53(3):178

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, UKGM GmbH, University Hospital of Marburg, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0300-1652.104393DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3531041PMC
July 2012

Response to "Gingival squamous cell carcinoma: A diagnostic impediment".

J Indian Soc Periodontol 2012 Jul;16(3):300-1

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Scientific Unit for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-124X.100899DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3498693PMC
July 2012

Kimura's Disease-Revisited.

Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther 2012 Sep 16;9(3):282-3; author reply 284-5. Epub 2012 Aug 16.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pdpdt.2012.06.006DOI Listing
September 2012

An analysis of microvessel density in salivary gland tumours: a single centre study.

Surgeon 2013 Jun 9;11(3):147-52. Epub 2012 Aug 9.

Department of Oral Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Backgrounds: Microvessel density (MVD) can be used for determining neoplastic neovascularisation. Tumour angiogenesis correlates with prognosis of cancers in many organs. The aims of this study were to evaluate MVD as demonstrated by CD31 and CD105 in salivary gland tumours (SGTs), and to correlate the MVD results with clinicopathological characteristics of the tumours.

Materials And Methods: Using a retrospective cohort study design, we enrolled SGTs patients at the Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand, over the 22-year period. The predictor variables included demographic, anatomic and histopathological parameters. The outcome measure was average CD31-MVD and CD105-MVD counted by the "hot spot" method. Descriptive, uni- and bivariate statistics were computed, and P <0.05 was considered statistically significant.

Results: The study sample consisted of 43 subjects with a mean age of 39.6 ± 17.8 years (range, 9-82), including 26 females (60.5%), diagnosed with SGTs. In this cohort, 58.1% of the cases were benign, and 83.7% were minor SGTs. There was a significant correlation between CD31-MVD and CD105-MVD (r = 0.8, P < 0.001), but mean CD31-MVD and CD105-MVD were 17.7 ± 9.3 and 12.8 ± 7.4, respectively (P = 0.009). Age, gender and tumour site were not individually associated with significant differences between CD31-MVD and CD105-MVD. Tumours with myoepithelial cells had lower MVD than those without myoepithelial cells (P = 0.04 for CD31; P = 0.03 for CD105). Only CD105-MVD showed statistical difference between benign and malignant SGTs (P = 0.01).

Conclusions: These results suggest that MVD in SGTs can be demonstrated by CD31 and CD105. Despite a strong correlation, CD31-MVD is always higher than CD105-MVD and cannot differentiate between benign and malignant SGTs. The presence of myoepithelial cells within SGTs affects the MVD analysis using either CD31 or CD105, while age, gender and tumour location do not.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surge.2012.07.004DOI Listing
June 2013

Intracranial extension of Schneiderian inverted papilloma: a case report and literature review.

Ger Med Sci 2012 18;10:Doc12. Epub 2012 Jun 18.

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

Inverted papilloma is an uncommon primary nasal tumor. Despite its benign nature, this tumor represents three typical characteristics: a high propensity of recurrence, local aggressiveness and association with malignancy. Inverted papilloma can reduce the patient's quality of life due to compromised nasal function, extension to the orbit and brain. The authors reported the unusual case of a 72-year-old male patient with inverted papilloma, which fatally extended to the intracranial temporal fossa after multiple recurrences. To the authors' knowledge, this is the twelfth case in the literature of inverted papilla extending into the temporal fossa. The current and pertinent literature in English, French and German was reviewed, and an algorithm for managing inverted papilloma was also proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3205/000163DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3380239PMC
October 2012

Pleomorphic adenoma of the upper lip: some clinicopathological considerations.

J Cutan Aesthet Surg 2012 Jan;5(1):51-2

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Scientific Unit for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0974-2077.94327DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3339134PMC
January 2012

Response to "Interventional sialendoscopy for treatment of juvenile recurrent parotitis".

J Indian Assoc Pediatr Surg 2012 Apr;17(2):91-3

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Scientific Unit for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3326838PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0971-9261.93982DOI Listing
April 2012

A randomized controlled trial comparing computer-aided learning with versus without tuition/lecture in promoting English proficiency.

Cogn Process 2012 Aug 13;13(3):277-83. Epub 2012 Mar 13.

Department of English Language, Triam Udom Suksa School, Bangkok, Thailand.

Aim: To compare test scores in English-error detection between Thai high school students undergoing self-learning by an online tool (computer-assisted learning: CAL) with versus without tuition/lecture.

Methods: This prospective, randomized, controlled study enrolled a sample of grade-12 high school students from a Thai secondary school. The predictor variable was the use of error-detection exercises in 9 separate 50-min tuition sessions during a 3-week period. Each subject was randomly assigned to receive a CAL program with or without tuition/lecture during the study interval: June-September 2009. The main outcome variable was the test scores of English-error identification. To measure the outcomes, the students were evaluated twice using the 25-question test within a 1-month interval (pre-test/post-test). Appropriate sample size estimates, descriptive, uni-, and bivariate statistics were calculated, and the level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05.

Results: The sample included 69 students, 36 of whom (52.2%) were in the intervention group (CAL plus teaching). Within-group comparisons showed statistically significant improvements in post-test scores, regardless of learning methods (P < 0.05). Tuition/lecture was significantly associated with the improved post-test scores (P = 0.0012) and with a higher number of students showing improved post-test scores (P = 0.0007).

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that tuition/lecture facilitates self-learning with CAL. In this sample, tuition/lecture still seems to be necessary for nonnative-English-speaking high school students to improve their English proficiency. CAL alone should not be used to replace conventional teaching.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10339-012-0437-0DOI Listing
August 2012

Morality, ethics, norms and research misconduct.

J Conserv Dent 2012 Jan;15(1):92-3

Department of Oral, Craniomaxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery, Scientific Unit for Clinical and Psychosocial Research, Evidence-Based Surgery and Ethics in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0972-0707.92617DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3284025PMC
January 2012
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