Publications by authors named "Poppy Bristow"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Interventricular Septal Hematoma Associated with Surgical Mitral Valve Repair in Four Dogs.

CASE (Phila) 2021 Feb 1;5(1):43-47. Epub 2020 Dec 1.

Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, United Kingdom.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.case.2020.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7887611PMC
February 2021

Arteriovenous Malformation of the Tongue Resulting in Recurrent Severe Hemorrhage in a Young Dog.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2020 Nov;56(6):336

From the Department of Clinical Sciences and Services (M.S., P.B.) and Department of Pathology and Pathogen Biology (C.L., N.H.), Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, United Kingdom.

An 8 mo old male entire beagle was presented to the emergency and critical care service following several severe bleeding episodes from the oral cavity. Oral examination revealed a purple, spongy, pulsatile lesion on the rostral two-thirds of the tongue. Computed tomography angiography revealed a severely distended right linguofacial vein with numerous, tortuous branching vessels within the tongue, consistent with an arteriovenous (AV) malformation. A cervical surgical approach was performed, and the right lingual artery was isolated and catheterized. A direct arteriogram confirmed this was the main feeder artery to the lesion, and it was ligated. Although the bleeding episodes initially resolved, a moderate bleeding episode occurred 6 days postoperatively, and a partial glossectomy was performed. Histopathology was consistent with an AV malformation. The dog had a good recovery from surgery and remains free of clinical signs 13 mo later. Following extensive review of the veterinary literature, this is the only reported case of a lingual AV malformation in the dog. Partial glossectomy resulted in resolution of the clinical signs and was well tolerated. Although rare, AV malformations should be considered as a differential diagnosis for spontaneous oropharyngeal bleeding.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/JAAHA-MS-7080DOI Listing
November 2020

Development of a pro-arrhythmic ex vivo intact human and porcine model: cardiac electrophysiological changes associated with cellular uncoupling.

Pflugers Arch 2020 10 1;472(10):1435-1446. Epub 2020 Sep 1.

Faculty of Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, Du Cane Road, London, W12 0NN, UK.

We describe a human and large animal Langendorff experimental apparatus for live electrophysiological studies and measure the electrophysiological changes due to gap junction uncoupling in human and porcine hearts. The resultant ex vivo intact human and porcine model can bridge the translational gap between smaller simple laboratory models and clinical research. In particular, electrophysiological models would benefit from the greater myocardial mass of a large heart due to its effects on far-field signal, electrode contact issues and motion artefacts, consequently more closely mimicking the clinical setting. Porcine (n = 9) and human (n = 4) donor hearts were perfused on a custom-designed Langendorff apparatus. Epicardial electrograms were collected at 16 sites across the left atrium and left ventricle. A total of 1 mM of carbenoxolone was administered at 5 ml/min to induce cellular uncoupling, and then recordings were repeated at the same sites. Changes in electrogram characteristics were analysed. We demonstrate the viability of a controlled ex vivo model of intact porcine and human hearts for electrophysiology with pharmacological modulation. Carbenoxolone reduces cellular coupling and changes contact electrogram features. The time from stimulus artefact to (-dV/dt) increased between baseline and carbenoxolone (47.9 ± 4.1-67.2 ± 2.7 ms) indicating conduction slowing. The features with the largest percentage change between baseline and carbenoxolone were fractionation + 185.3%, endpoint amplitude - 106.9%, S-endpoint gradient + 54.9%, S point - 39.4%, RS ratio + 38.6% and (-dV/dt) - 20.9%. The physiological relevance of this methodological tool is that it provides a model to further investigate pharmacologically induced pro-arrhythmic substrates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00424-020-02446-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7476990PMC
October 2020

Heterozygosity for P2Y12 receptor gene mutation associated with postoperative hemorrhage in a Greater Swiss Mountain dog.

Vet Clin Pathol 2017 Dec 11;46(4):569-574. Epub 2017 Aug 11.

Department of Clinical Studies, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

A 3-year-old, female Greater Swiss Mountain dog developed a hemoperitoneum following an exploratory laparotomy and ovariohysterectomy. Platelet count, PT, APTT, and plasma von Willebrand factor antigen concentration were within RIs. A buccal mucosal bleeding time (BMBT) was prolonged. Given the probability of a hereditary thrombopathia, the dog was administered desmopressin, fresh platelet transfusions, and aminocaproic acid to control hemorrhage. Subsequently, DNA testing for the P2Y12 receptor gene mutation identified the dog as being a heterozygote (carrier). Further platelet function testing was performed following complete recovery. Results of a repeat BMBT and a point-of-care screening test using the Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (collagen/adenosine-diphosphate [ADP] test cartridge) were within RIs. Flow cytometric studies demonstrated a marked reduction in fibrinogen binding to the dog's platelets in response to ADP - adenosine diphosphate activation. Likewise, turbidimetric aggregometry revealed a complete absence of platelet aggregation in response to ADP. However, there were a normal aggregation response to the platelet agonist convulxin and a mild reduction in amplitude in response to γ-thrombin. This is the first report of a dog heterozygous for the P2Y12 receptor gene mutation exhibiting a bleeding tendency and having evidence of impaired platelet function in vitro in response to ADP activation. Given that the mutant allele for the P2Y12 thrombopathia appears to be widespread in the Greater Swiss Mountain dog breed, veterinarians need to be aware that both homozygotes and heterozygotes for this platelet receptor mutation are at risk of developing life-threatening bleeding following trauma or surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vcp.12533DOI Listing
December 2017

Clinical comparison of the hybrid dynamic compression plate and the castless plate for pancarpal arthrodesis in 219 dogs.

Vet Surg 2015 Jan 7;44(1):70-7. Epub 2014 Apr 7.

Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, UK.

Objective: To describe and compare a large population of dogs that had pancarpal arthrodesis (PCA) using either a hybrid dynamic compression plate (HDCP) or a CastLess Plate (CLP).

Study Design: Multicenter, retrospective, cohort study.

Animals: Dogs (n = 240; 261 PCA).

Methods: Medical records (2000-2012) from 12 UK orthopedic centers were reviewed for dogs that had PCA to document signalment, diagnosis, arthrodesis method, and complication rates. Follow-up data were used to compare outcome (lameness evaluation and radiographic healing) after use of HDCP and CLP plates.

Results: PCA was performed with HDCP in 125 cases, CLP in 105, and by other techniques in 31. Carpal hyperextension injury was the most common diagnosis in HDCP and CLP groups. Surgical site infection (18.3%) was the most common postoperative complication. There was no difference in intra- (11% HDCP, 21% CLP) or postoperative (34% HDCP, 41% CLP) complication rates. Use of external coaptation did not affect postoperative complication rates or outcome. External coaptation related complications occurred in 32% HDCP and 18% CLP (P = .02). At median follow-up, most dogs were classified as having no or mild lameness (73% HDCP, 83% CLP) and there was radiographic healing in 40% HDCP and 46% CLP (P = .8) cases.

Conclusions: CLP and HDCP may both be used successfully to achieve pancarpal arthrodesis. Adjunctive external coaptation does not appear to have a measurable clinical benefit but is associated with morbidity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-950X.2014.12183.xDOI Listing
January 2015

Use of vacuum-assisted closure to maintain viability of a skin flap in a dog.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013 Sep;243(6):863-8

Queen Mother Hospital for Animals, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, England.

Case Description: A 4-year-old sexually intact male Labrador Retriever-Poodle mix was admitted to the hospital for treatment of a wound in the left thoracic region. The wound had been debrided and primary closure had been performed by the referring veterinarian 4 days previously.

Clinical Findings: The dog had a 20-cm-long wound covered by a large flap of skin that extended caudally from the scapula over the left side of the thorax. A 3-cm defect was evident at the cranioventral aspect of the wound, from which purulent material was being discharged. The skin flap was necrotic, and the skin surrounding the flap was bruised. Signs of pain were elicited when the wound and surrounding region were palpated. Other findings, including those of thoracic radiography, were unremarkable.

Treatment And Outcome: The wound was debrided, and vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) was initiated for 3 days until a healthy bed of granulation tissue developed. A reconstructive procedure was performed with a rotation flap 3 days after VAC dressing removal. The VAC process was reinitiated 2 days following reconstruction because of an apparent failing of the skin flap viability. After 5 days of VAC, the flap had markedly improved in color and consistency and VAC was discontinued. Successful healing of the flap occurred without the need for debridement or additional intervention.

Clinical Relevance: Use of VAC led to a good overall outcome for the dog, with complete healing achieved. Additional evaluation of this technique for salvaging failing skin flaps is warranted in dogs, particularly considering that no reliable method for flap salvage in veterinary species has been reported to date.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.243.6.863DOI Listing
September 2013