Publications by authors named "Polyxeni Pratsidou-Gertsi"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Impact of the longitudinal quantitative assessment of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus severity on the disease outcome.

Clin Rheumatol 2021 Feb 7;40(2):675-682. Epub 2020 Jul 7.

Pediatric Nephrology Unit, 1st Dept. of Pediatrics, Hippokration General Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Objectives: This study on juvenile SLE patients aimed to evaluate retrospectively the impact of a tertiary center's management policy of the disease severity on its long-term progression and cumulative damage development as well as provision of quality-driven medical care (QmC).

Methods: Disease activity was assessed by the Physician Global Assessment and SLEDAI-2K, flares by SELENA/SLEDAI, and damage by the pediatric SLICC/DI at diagnosis, 6 months post-diagnosis, and annually thereafter. At the same time, QmC was evaluated by relevant indices and quality of life was captured by the Greek version of the General Health Questionnaire only at the last visit.

Results: A total of 35 patients (25/35 females) aged at diagnosis 5.5-15.16 years (median 11.83) with a median lag time to diagnosis 1.8 months had a follow-up of 5 (35/35) and 10 years (13/35), respectively. The predominant baseline manifestations were consistent with those previously reported. Out of 35 patients, 24 (68.5%) were clinically inactive at year 5, and 5/13 (38%) at year 10. All patients received immunosuppressives and 7/35 biologics in addition. At the end of their follow-up, damage was found in 9/35 patients, but none of them had a neuropsychiatric disorder. Over the study, 28/35 patients were compliant with the QmC recommendations.

Conclusions: An early diagnosis combined with a longitudinal quantitative assessment of the disease activity and severity contributes to the continuous evaluation of the disease state. They are the key determinants for the selection of an early, targeted, and personalized management; they restrict the cumulative damage development and contribute to an optimal outcome. Key Points • Juvenile SLE has a heavier introductory profile than in adults and an unpredictable trajectory. • The application of contemporary metric tools for assessing the disease state leads to an objective assessment and regimen selection. • An early diagnosis combined with longitudinal quantitative assessment is a key determinant for an optimal management and a minimal damage development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-020-05252-8DOI Listing
February 2021

Capturing the enthesitis related arthritis contemporary profile of Caucasian patients in the era of biologics.

Rheumatol Int 2020 Jun 22;40(6):941-949. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

4th Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

To describe the profile of Enthesitis Related Arthritis' (ERA) patients, in the era of biologic DMARDs (bDMARDs). This retrospective cohort study included patients with ERA monitored on a 3-month schedule for at least 1 year. Their metric assessment included the disease status and damage by applying the contemporary tools clinical-Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (c-JADAS), Juvenile Spondyloarthritis Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), clinical remission (CR) on/off medication and Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index (JADI). 43 patients (males 26) were enrolled, with a mean disease onset of 10.75 years. Median lag time from diagnosis to bDMARDs was 8.5 months. Patients with sacroiliitis received earlier bDMARDs (hazard ratio, HR 3.26). 36/43 patients achieved CR on medication (median time 11 months), which was correlated with compliance (HR: 3.62). The percentage of CR in patients with or without sacroiliitis was 35% and 63% respectively (p = 0.02). Twenty patients (47%) experienced a flare following CR (75%). The median flare-free survival following CR on/off medication was 42 and 34 months, respectively. At the last evaluation, both median baseline cJADAS and JSpADA dropped to 0, 13/43 patients had a persistent disease activity, while 17/43 and 13/43 patients were in CR on/off medication, respectively. The median patient percentage of CR was 54% and no patient had a JADI > 0. Increased lag time to bDMARDs was associated with increased CR (Odds ratio: 1.48). Early administration of bDMARDs and compliance improved long-term outcome of ERA. Sacroiliitis was a negative prognostic factor with an increased need for bDMARDs and diminished rates of CR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-020-04581-wDOI Listing
June 2020

Paediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as the introductory manifestation in a patient with Childhood Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Mediterr J Rheumatol 2019 Jun 29;30(2):135-138. Epub 2019 Jun 29.

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Ippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.31138/mjr.30.2.135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7045961PMC
June 2019

Growth and Puberty in Juvenile Dermatomyositis: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) 2020 Feb;72(2):265-273

IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation, Genoa, Italy.

Objective: To study growth and puberty in a multinational longitudinal prospective cohort of children with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM).

Methods: Children from 31 countries who were ages <18 years and had juvenile DM in active phase were studied, and analyses of height, weight, and pubertal development were conducted in those who had follow-up visits during a 2-year period and for whom anthropometric data was available.

Results: A total of 196 of 275 children (71%) were included. We found a significant reduction in parent-adjusted height Z score over time in female patients (P < 0.0001) and male patients (P = 0.001), but with catch-up growth at the final study visit. Median body mass index Z score peaked at 6 months (P < 0.0001) and was still significantly above baseline at the final study visit, which was at a median of 26 months after baseline (P = 0.007), with no difference between sexes. Female patients with a disease duration ≥12 months after onset had significantly lower parent-adjusted height Z score (P = 0.002) and no 2-year catch-up growth. At the final study visit, growth failure was seen in 20 of 97 female patients (21%) and in 11 of 73 male patients (15%). Height deflection (∆height Z score less than -0.25/year) was observed in 29 of 116 female patients (25%) and 25 of 80 male patients (31.3%). Delayed puberty was seen in 20 of 55 female patients (36.4%) and in 11 of 31 male patients (35.5%). Children in early pubertal stage at baseline had the highest risk of growth failure.

Conclusion: Juvenile DM in the active phase and/or its treatment has a significant impact on growth and puberty in affected children. Children with recent onset of puberty or previous growth failure have the highest risk of delayed pubertal development and further growth retardation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.24065DOI Listing
February 2020

Transition of pediatric patients with an Auto-inflammatory Disease: an alternative version of the myth.

Mediterr J Rheumatol 2018 Sep 27;29(3):156-162. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology Referral Center, First Dept. of Pediatrics, Aristotle University, Hippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.

Progress in the pediatric Auto-inflammatory Diseases (AIDs) has led to improved long-term outcome and the increased pool of pediatric patients who require lifelong monitoring. Implementation of a successful stepwise transition in patients with AIDs denotes the presence of a structured flexible and individualized policy that ensues the stepwise move from family-based pediatric care to adult patient one. This process aims to equip the young adult with self-management skills and the ability to enjoy life even under the burden of a chronic disease. Transition, thus, is a continuously evolutionary process that assists adolescents and young adults with an AID to move into a future that their predecessors with similar diseases never needed to experience. This review, using the myth of Daedalus and Icarus as a scaffold, presents the contemporary profile of the adolescent patient, comments on the evidence derived from Transition recommendations, and emphasizes the need of periodic quantitative assessments to assess the efficacy of the Transition plan. Upon the completion of the transfer to the Adult Center, monitoring of the patient's active participation will support his/her engagement in the new setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31138/mjr.29.3.156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7046050PMC
September 2018

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis in the biologic era: predictors of the disease progression and need for early introduction of biologic treatment.

Rheumatol Int 2018 07 29;38(7):1241-1250. Epub 2018 May 29.

First Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology Referral Center, Ippokration General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 49 Konstantinoupoleos St, 54642, Thessaloniki, Greece.

To assess longitudinally the course and outcome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in patients diagnosed and followed-up exclusively in the biologic era; also, to define possible predictors of the disease progression and need for early implementation of biologicals. Prospective and retrospective, monocentric cohort study of 120 JIA patients, diagnosed between 2001 and 2010, and followed-up for ≥ 4 years (median 8.04). Disease activity, cumulative articular/extra-articular damage and quality of life were evaluated by the assessment tools Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS71), Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index (JADI) and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), respectively. Moreover, potential predictors of the disease progression and their relation to biologic therapy were investigated. High JADAS71 score (> 9) at diagnosis was indicative of progression to polyarticular course and the need for early introduction of biologic treatment. Other independent predictors of progression to polyarthritis, were: involvement of upper limb, hip and ankle within 6 months following JIA diagnosis and percentage of cumulative time with active disease > 35% within the first year. At the end of the study, both the median JADAS71 score and the Disability Index were significantly lower than the initial (p < 0.001) and remission off medication was achieved in 25% of the patients. Articular and extra-articular (only ocular) cumulative damage was demonstrated only in 5 and 7.5% of patients, respectively. Physical functional ability was found normal/mildly restricted in 93.3% and moderately restricted in 6.7% of the patients. We believe that these findings, fit in with a picture of JIA course and outcome under current conditions of objective "disease status" evaluation and of tightly controlled follow-up. Predictors emerged from our study could contribute to the identification of patients who will need early implementation of biologic treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-018-4062-9DOI Listing
July 2018

The Greek version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

Rheumatol Int 2018 Apr 7;38(Suppl 1):219-226. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Clinica Pediatrica e Reumatologia, Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO), Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Via Gaslini 5, 16147, Genoa, Italy.

The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Greek language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in 10 JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographics, clinical data, and the JAMAR from 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability, and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). The Greek JAMAR was fully cross-culturally adapted with two forward and three backward translations. A total of 272 JIA patients (5.9% systemic, 57.7% oligoarticular, 21.3% RF negative poly-arthritis, 15.1% other categories), and 100 healthy children were enrolled in all centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well-healthy subjects from JIA patients; notably, there was no significant difference between healthy subjects and their affected peers in psychosocial quality of life and school-related items. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Greek version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and in clinical research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-018-3954-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5893705PMC
April 2018

Predictors and long-term outcome in Greek adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a 17-year continuous follow-up study.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2017 11;56(11):1928-1938

4th Academic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University.

Objectives: To describe the disease characteristics, continuous course and long-term outcome and to evaluate predictors of outcome in JIA in Greece.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of 17 years' prospective data on JIA. Outcome assessment included radiographic (modified Sharp-van der Heidje score), articular and extra-articular damage (Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index), functional ability (HAQ Disability Index), and the cumulative percentage time spent in a state of active disease and also in clinical remission off medication (CR) (according to Wallace's criteria).

Results: One hundred and two (72 females) patients under regular follow-up were enrolled. The disease age of onset [mean (SD)] was 7.7 (4) years, the interval from onset to last visit was 17.2 (6.7) years and the patients' current age was 25 (5.9) years. At the last follow-up visit, 53 patients (52%) had disease activity, while 23.5% were in CR. The cumulative percentage time spent in a state of active disease and CR over the disease course was 52.6 and 17.8%, respectively. Polyarticular subtype of onset and longer disease activity during the first 5 years were independent predictors of worse outcome. Additional telephone-based interviews of 205 former JIA patients who had been lost to follow-up as adults were performed to extend the interpretation of our findings to a broader JIA population. Almost half (47.6%) of the total cohort of 307 patients were found to be in CR at the final evaluation and 69.7% had no disability.

Conclusion: The available data indicate that JIA as a whole is a heterogeneous disease with significant variability in course and long-term outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kex265DOI Listing
November 2017

Health related quality of life measure in systemic pediatric rheumatic diseases and its translation to different languages: an international collaboration.

Pediatr Rheumatol Online J 2014 25;12:49. Epub 2014 Nov 25.

Department of Pediatrics, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB Canada.

Background: Rheumatic diseases in children are associated with significant morbidity and poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). There is no health-related quality of life (HRQOL) scale available specifically for children with less common rheumatic diseases. These diseases share several features with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) such as their chronic episodic nature, multi-systemic involvement, and the need for immunosuppressive medications. HRQOL scale developed for pediatric SLE will likely be applicable to children with systemic inflammatory diseases.

Findings: We adapted Simple Measure of Impact of Lupus Erythematosus in Youngsters (SMILEY©) to Simple Measure of Impact of Illness in Youngsters (SMILY©-Illness) and had it reviewed by pediatric rheumatologists for its appropriateness and cultural suitability. We tested SMILY©-Illness in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases and then translated it into 28 languages. Nineteen children (79% female, n=15) and 17 parents participated. The mean age was 12±4 years, with median disease duration of 21 months (1-172 months). We translated SMILY©-Illness into the following 28 languages: Danish, Dutch, French (France), English (UK), German (Germany), German (Austria), German (Switzerland), Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese (Brazil), Slovene, Spanish (USA and Puerto Rico), Spanish (Spain), Spanish (Argentina), Spanish (Mexico), Spanish (Venezuela), Turkish, Afrikaans, Arabic (Saudi Arabia), Arabic (Egypt), Czech, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Japanese, Romanian, Serbian and Xhosa.

Conclusion: SMILY©-Illness is a brief, easy to administer and score HRQOL scale for children with systemic rheumatic diseases. It is suitable for use across different age groups and literacy levels. SMILY©-Illness with its available translations may be used as useful adjuncts to clinical practice and research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1546-0096-12-49DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4334772PMC
May 2015

Dissecting the damage in Northern Greek patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a retrospective cohort study.

Rheumatol Int 2015 Jul 14;35(7):1225-32. Epub 2015 Jan 14.

1st Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology Referral Center, Hippokration Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece,

The improved survival of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) has resulted in longer patients' exposure to disease inflammation, medications and/or comorbid diseases, which can all contribute to the development of organ damage. The aim of this study was to assess the evolution of damage accrual in cSLE patients overtime and investigate for predisposing factors. Disease characteristics and treatment in 47 Northern Greek Caucasian cSLE patients were retrospectively reviewed. The Systemic Lupus International Collaboration Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI) was used for damage assessment and the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM) to monitor cSLE activity. After a median disease duration of 7.4 years, 17/47 patients (36 %) had developed damage (SDI > 0). The most frequent domains damaged were the ocular (41 %), neuropsychiatric (35 %) and peripheral vascular (35 %) one. Peripheral vascular and neuropsychiatric damage was seen more frequently during the first 5 years of the disease. Longer exposure to azathioprine was associated with higher SDI at the end of follow-up (β = 0.008 for every additional month of use, p = 0.041). The mean annual flare frequency was associated with a shorter time interval until the development of the first damage (hazard's ratio, HR 2.38 for each unit of increase, p = 0.018), while hydroxychloroquine use was associated with longer time interval (HR 0.19, p = 0.007). The lower rates of damage accrual in this study compared to other cohorts might be due to milder disease phenotype in Greek Caucasian cSLE patients, prompt diagnosis and effective disease control. Damage was noticed early in the disease course, and one-third of patients had an SDI > 0 at study completion. Disease flares and a severe disease course leading to prolonged use of immunosuppressives were significant risk factors, while hydroxychloroquine use was protective against cSLE damage accrual.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00296-014-3209-6DOI Listing
July 2015

Achievement of clinical remission in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis under a 2-10-year Etanercept exposure.

Clin Rheumatol 2013 Aug 19;32(8):1191-7. Epub 2013 Apr 19.

Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology Referral Center, 1st Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University, Ippokration Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece.

The objective of this retrospective study was to record the achievement of clinical remission (CR) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients under a 2-10 years' administration of Etanercept (ETN) and to detect any variables associated with CR. Patients previously resistant to conventional regimens were enrolled. The annual impact of ETN was assessed by: (a) the American College of Rheumatology pediatric criteria (ACRpedi), (b) the pre- and posttreatment disease activity score (juvenile arthritis disease activity score [JADAS71]), and (c) Wallace's criteria for CR. A total of 41 patients (F: 31) were registered. The median age and disease duration at baseline were 10.6 and 4.17 years, respectively, and their disease course was mainly polyarthritis (32/41). In respect to baseline, there was an impressive JADAS71 reduction posttreatment, most prominent after the first year. From year 1 to 5, more than 50 % of the patients achieved and retained CR and 66 % reached an ACRpedi 70, whereas after the 5th year, no patient was withdrawn due to an ACRpedi <30. JADAS71 at baseline was not associated with the subsequent CR achievement. However, JADAS71 1-year posttreatment had a significant association with the CR of the second posttreatment year, (p = 0.028, OR 0.79; 95 % CI 0.63-0.98) and a similar trend was observed for the following years. These findings emphasize the sustained impact of ETN in the achievement of CR. A low JADAS71 score 1-year posttreatment, may be associated with the maintenance of CR over the next treatment year.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-013-2261-zDOI Listing
August 2013

Ghrelin levels in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to anti-tumor necrosis factor treatment and disease activity.

Metabolism 2011 Oct 6;60(10):1359-62. Epub 2011 May 6.

Clinical Nutrition Laboratory, Department of Nutrition/Dietetics, Alexander Technological Education Institute of Thessaloniki, PO BOX 141 GR-574 00 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Studies in adults with rheumatoid arthritis reported low serum ghrelin that increased following anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) infusion. Data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to explore serum ghrelin levels in patients with JIA and the possible association with anti-TNF treatment, disease activity, and nutritional status. Fifty-two patients with JIA (14/52 on anti-TNF treatment) were studied. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was inactive in 3 of 14 anti-TNF-treated patients and in 11 of 38 non-anti-TNF-treated patients. The nutritional status, energy intake/requirements, appetite, and fasting serum ghrelin levels were assessed. Ghrelin control values were obtained from 50 individuals with minor illness matched for age, sex, and body mass index. Ghrelin levels in patients with JIA were significantly lower than in controls (P < .001, confidence interval [CI] = -101 to -331). Analysis according to anti-TNF treatment and disease activity showed that ghrelin levels were comparable to control values only in 3 patients with anti-TNF-induced remission. Ghrelin in non-anti-TNF-treated patients in remission was low. Multiple regression analysis showed that disease activity (P = .002, CI = -84.16 to -20.01) and anti-TNF treatment (P = .003, CI = -82.51 to -18.33) were significant independent predictors of ghrelin after adjusting for other potential confounders. Ghrelin did not correlate with nutritional status, energy balance, and appetite. Serum ghrelin is low in patients with JIA and is restored to values similar to those in controls following anti-TNF-induced remission. Our study provides evidence that TNF blockade is independently associated with serum ghrelin, which possibly contributes to anti-TNF-induced remission. These preliminary results could form the basis for future research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2011.03.006DOI Listing
October 2011

The effect of anti-TNF treatment on the immunogenicity and safety of the 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Vaccine 2010 Jul 12;28(31):5109-13. Epub 2010 May 12.

1st Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Immunology and Rheumatology Referral Center, Hippokration General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 49 Konstantinoupoleos St., 54642 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Our aim was to study the effect of anti-TNF treatment on immunogenicity and safety of the 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Thirty-one children (mean age:12.9+/-4.6 years) treated with anti-TNFs plus Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) and 32 age-matched children treated only with DMARDs were vaccinated with two doses of PCV7. After the first vaccine dose geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly increased for all vaccine serotypes (p<0.0001) in both groups and were found to be protective (>0.35microg/ml) in 87-100% of all children, depending on the serotype. Children receiving anti-TNFs achieved a significantly lower GMTs against serotypes 4, 14 and 23F (p<0.05). A >or=4-fold increase of the baseline titers to >or=5 vaccine serotypes was observed in 50% and 75% of the anti-TNF and control patients, respectively (p=0.0697). No patient developed vaccine-associated serious adverse events or disease flares.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.03.080DOI Listing
July 2010

The significance of persistent newly developed autoantibodies in JIA patients under long-term anti-TNF treatment.

Cytokine 2008 Jun 28;42(3):293-7. Epub 2008 Apr 28.

First Department of Pediatrics, Aristotle University, Ippokration General Hospital, 54642 Thessaloniki, Greece.

Objective: To study the significance of persistent (12 months) new autoantibodies, in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) patients treated with either Infliximab (INFL) or Etanercept (ET) for 2 years.

Patients-methods: 26 children under INFL (n=12) or ET (n=14) were prospectively studied. A large panel of autoantibodies was tested using indirect immunofluorescence (ANA, anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA, SMA, LKM, AMA, PCA, anti-R1, ATA), ELISA (ANA, anti-ENA, anti-cardiolipin, ANCA), immunoblotting assay (anti-ENA: anti-Ro, anti-La, anti-Sm, anti-URNP, anti-Jo, anti-Scl70, anti-centromere, anti-ribosomal and anti-histone) and rate nephelometry (RF).

Results: Apart from the positive patients for ANA (13/26) and RF (2/26) prior to anti-TNF treatment, 6/26 patients (23%) developed new autoantibodies (SMA, anti-R1, ATA) which persisted for 12-50 months. None developed antibodies to nuclear antigens. In only one case, ATA was associated with the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

Conclusions: These findings indicate that in JIA patients in contrast to adult RA patients, development of new autoantibodies to various nuclear antigens is rare. Other non relevant to rheumatic diseases autoantibodies, may appear and persist for >12 months, but very rarely they may be related to clinical entities, especially in the presence of a positive family history of autoimmunity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2008.01.007DOI Listing
June 2008

Assessment of damage in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a multicenter cohort study.

Arthritis Rheum 2003 Aug;49(4):501-7

Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico G. Gaslini, Genoa, Italy.

Objective: To investigate the prevalence of cumulative organ damage in patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its association with demographic and clinical variables, medication use, and quality of life.

Methods: The occurrence of organ system damage, as measured by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SDI), was determined for 387 patients consecutively enrolled in pediatric rheumatology centers from Europe, the US, Mexico, and Japan. Risk factors for damage included demographic variables; clinical manifestations at diagnosis; previous corticosteroid, immunosuppressive, and antimalarial therapies; disease activity; and quality of life.

Results: Overall, 195 (50.5%) patients had damage within a mean of 5.7 years after disease onset. Renal (21.8%) and neuropsychiatric (15.8%) system involvement were observed most frequently, followed by musculoskeletal (11.7%), ocular (10.9%) and skin (9.6%) system involvement, with a mean SDI score of 1.1. In multivariate models, the occurrence of neuropsychiatric manifestations at diagnosis, a longer disease duration, and a greater number of intravenous cyclophosphamide pulses showed the strongest association with the presence of damage.

Conclusion: We found evidence of cumulative organ damage, as measured by the SDI, in half of the patients with juvenile-onset SLE. Damage was significantly more likely in patients who had experienced neuropsychiatric manifestations at diagnosis, had a longer disease duration, and had received more intravenous pulses of cyclophosphamide.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.11205DOI Listing
August 2003