Publications by authors named "Po-Chen Shih"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Finger-powered agglutination lab chip with CMOS image sensing for rapid point-of-care diagnosis applications.

Lab Chip 2020 01 24;20(2):424-433. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 30013, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Agglutination is an antigen-antibody reaction with visible expression of aggregation of the antigens and their corresponding antibodies. Applications extend to the identification of acute bacterial infection, hemagglutination, such as blood grouping, and diagnostic immunology. Our finger-powered agglutination lab chip with external CMOS image sensing was developed to support a platform for inexpensive, rapid point-of-care (POC) testing applications related to agglutination effects. In this paper, blood grouping (ABO and Rh grouping) was utilized to demonstrate the function of our finger-powered agglutination lab chip with CMOS image sensing. Blood antibodies were preloaded into the antibody reaction chamber in the lab chip. The blood sample was pushed through the antibody reaction chamber using finger-powered pressure actuation to initiate a hemagglutination reaction to identify the blood type at the on-chip detection area using our homemade CMOS image sensing mini-system. Finger-powered actuation without the need for external electrical pumping is excellent for low-cost POC applications, but the pumping liquid volume per finger push is hard to control. In our finger-powered agglutination lab chip with CMOS image sensing, we minimized the effects of different finger push depths and achieved robust performance for the test results with different push depths. The driving sample volume per finger push is about 0.79 mm. For different chips and different pushes, the driven sample volume per finger push was observed to vary in the range of 0.64 to 1.18 mm. The red blood cells were separated from the plasma on-chip after the whole blood sample was finger pumped and before the red blood cells reached the antibody chamber via an embedded plasma-separation membrane. Our homemade CMOS image mini-system robustly read and identified the agglutination results on our agglutination lab chip.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c9lc00961bDOI Listing
January 2020

A biologically inspired lung-on-a-chip device for the study of protein-induced lung inflammation.

Integr Biol (Camb) 2015 Feb;7(2):162-9

Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China.

This study reports a biomimetic microsystem that reconstitutes the lung microenvironment for monitoring the role of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in lung inflammation. ECP induces the airway epithelial cell expression of CXCL-12, which in turn stimulates the migration of fibrocytes towards the epithelium. This two-layered microfluidic system provides a feasible platform for perfusion culture, and was used in this study to reveal that the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis mediates ECP induced fibrocyte extravasation in lung inflammation. This 'lung-on-a-chip' microdevice serves as a dynamic transwell system by introducing a flow that can reconstitute the blood vessel-tissue interface for in vitro assays, enhancing pre-clinical studies. We made an attempt to develop a new microfluidic model which could not only simulate the transwell for studying cell migration, but could also study the migration in the presence of a flow mimicking the physiological conditions in the body. As blood vessels are the integral part of our body, this model gives an opportunity to study more realistic in vitro models of organs where the blood vessel i.e. flow based migration is involved.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c4ib00239cDOI Listing
February 2015

Effects of garlic oil on the migration of neutrophil-like cell studied by using a chemotactic gradient Labchip.

J Biomed Biotechnol 2010 3;2010:319059. Epub 2010 May 3.

Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan.

We have designed and fabricated a novel chemotactic gradient Labchip for studying cell migration quantitatively. Owing to the great potential of garlic and its preparations in developing antiinflammatory drugs, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of garlic oil on the locomotion of a neutrophil-like cell by measuring the dynamic features of cell migration including migration direction, average migration speed, chemotactic index (CI), and motility index (MI) with the newly designed Labchip. We found that garlic oil treatment lowered the values of CI and MI and reduced the average speed of cell migration from 13 to 8 microm/min. The results indicate that garlic oil is a potential inhibitor for neutrophil-like cell migration and chemotactic responsiveness. By comparing with the effects of nocodazole and cytochalasin B, we also suggest that the antiinflammatory activity exhibited by garlic oil was mainly through inhibiting the assembly-disassembly processes of the cytoskeleton.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/319059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2862952PMC
September 2010