Publications by authors named "Ploysyne Rattanakaemakorn"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cutaneous, systemic features and laboratory characteristics of late- versus adult-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in 1006 Thai patients.

Lupus 2021 Apr 7;30(5):785-794. Epub 2021 Feb 7.

Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Age at disease onset may modulate systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but its relation to cutaneous/extracutaneous manifestation remains understudied.

Objective: To compare the cutaneous, systemic features, laboratory characteristics, and disease severity between late- and adult-onset SLE patients.

Methods: Analyses of the cutaneous, systemic involvement, laboratory investigations, SLE disease activity index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K), and disease damage were performed to compare between groups.

Results: Of 1006 SLE patients, 740 and 226 had adult- (15-50 years) and late-onset (>50 years), respectively. Among 782 with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), acute CLE (ACLE) and chronic CLE (CCLE) were more common in the adult- and late-onset SLE, respectively ( = 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression analysis demonstrated that male patients and skin signs, including papulosquamous subacute CLE, discoid lupus erythematosus, and lupus profundus, were associated with late-onset SLE (all  < 0.05). Late-onset SLE had lower lupus-associated autoantibodies, and systemic involvement (all  < 0.05). ACLE, CCLE, mucosal lupus, alopecia, and non-specific lupus were related to higher disease activity in adult-onset SLE (all  < 0.001). There was no difference in the damage index between the two groups.

Conclusions: Late-onset SLE had a distinct disease expression with male predominance, milder disease activity, and lower systemic involvement. Cutaneous manifestations may hold prognostic values for SLE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0961203321991920DOI Listing
April 2021

UV-C light: A powerful technique for inactivating microorganisms and the related side effects to the skin.

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2021 Jan 4;37(1):12-19. Epub 2020 Oct 4.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Hospital-associated infections have led to a significant increment of morbidity and mortality among patients. As a result, the public health had concentrated on preventing the transmission of infection using environmental controls. UV-C radiation or ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) had caught interest for decades as it can potentially degrade many kinds of microorganisms. This review aims to highlight the current information regarding the ability of UV-C radiation in terms of disinfection and focuses on its application and safety in the medical field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12605DOI Listing
January 2021

Scalp Pruritus: Review of the Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management.

Biomed Res Int 2019 15;2019:1268430. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Scalp pruritus is a frequent problem encountered in dermatological practice. This disorder is caused by various underlying diseases and is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Scalp pruritus may be localized to the scalp or extended to other body areas. It is sometimes not only associated with skin diseases or specific skin changes, but also associated with lesions secondary to rubbing or scratching. Moreover, scalp pruritus may be difficult to diagnose and manage and may have a great impact on the quality of life of patients. It can be classified as dermatologic, neuropathic, systemic, and psychogenic scalp pruritus based on the potential underlying disease. A thorough evaluation of patients presenting with scalp pruritus is important. Taking history and performing physical examination and further investigations are essential for diagnosis. Therapeutic strategy comprises removal of the aggravating factors and appropriate treatment of the underlying condition. All treatments should be performed considering an individual approach. This review article focuses on the understanding of the pathophysiology and the diagnostic and therapeutic management of scalp pruritus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2019/1268430DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6350598PMC
May 2019

Efficacy and safety of 308-nm excimer lamp in the treatment of scalp psoriasis: a retrospective study.

Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2019 May 31;35(3):172-177. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Background: Scalp psoriasis is a major therapeutic challenge due to the hindrance caused by hair. Treatment with the 308-nm excimer lamp is purported to provide many benefits over conventional phototherapy. This retrospective study evaluates the efficacy, safety, and effective dosage of 308-nm excimer light in the treatment of scalp psoriasis.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with scalp psoriasis who received treatment with 308-nm excimer light. Clinical and epidemiological data as well as details regarding treatment were statistically analyzed to determine the treatment outcomes.

Results: Twenty patients with scalp psoriasis were included in the study. Their mean age was 47.45 ± 17.93 years. Eleven patients responded to treatment at the end of 10 sessions. The median baseline Psoriatic Scalp Severity Index (PSSI) was 12 (range, 3-32). At the end of the protocol, the median PSSI was 4.5 (range, 0-24), indicating a statistically significant reduction (P < 0.001). Common adverse effects included erythema, irritation, and desquamation.

Conclusion: The 308-nm excimer light appears to be an effective and safe modality that requires short treatment time. The modality could be considered as an alternative or adjuvant treatment for scalp psoriasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/phpp.12448DOI Listing
May 2019

Unusual manifestation of vitamin A deficiency presenting with generalized xerosis without night blindness.

Clin Case Rep 2018 May 13;6(5):878-882. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

Division of Nutrition and Biochemical Medicine Department of Medicine Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital Mahidol University Bangkok 10400 Thailand.

Vitamin A deficiency from malabsorption syndromes, including bariatric surgery, has become an emerging problem in developed countries. Early detection and prompt treatment lead to rapid and complete recovery. Nevertheless, it may result in irreversible blindness or death if left untreated. Health care personnel should be aware of this condition.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ccr3.1475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5930185PMC
May 2018

The efficacy of methotrexate in the treatment of en coup de sabre (linear morphea subtype).

J Dermatolog Treat 2018 Mar 29;29(2):197-199. Epub 2017 Jun 29.

b Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine , Winston Salem , NC , USA.

Background: En coup de sabre is a rare subtype of linear morphea, located on the forehead or frontoparietal scalp. Systemic treatment of localised morphea with methotrexate has been reported in a few clinical reports. However, there are no case series using methotrexate treatment for En coup de sabre.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of methotrexate in the treatment of en coup de sabre linear morphea subtype.

Method: A retrospective chart review was performed for paediatric and the adult patients with en coup de sabre evaluated in the Dermatology Clinic at Wake Forest University School of Medicine treated with methotrexate.

Results: There were 7 patients who met criteria for inclusion in the study. The mean age at the onset of disease was 11.8 years (ranging from 4 to 38 years). The mean duration of disease before receiving methotrexate therapy was 9.4 months (ranging from 3 to 24 months). Seven (100%) patients improved with methotrexate therapy, in an average of 2 months to disease inactivity, and 16 months to discontinuation of methotrexate.

Conclusions: Methotrexate appeared to be an effective and safe therapy for en coup de sabre patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09546634.2017.1341615DOI Listing
March 2018

Pythiosis presenting with digital gangrene and subcutaneous nodules mimicking medium vessel vasculitis.

JAAD Case Rep 2015 Nov 5;1(6):399-402. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2015.09.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809401PMC
November 2015

Leprosy Reaction in Thai Population: A 20-Year Retrospective Study.

Dermatol Res Pract 2015 5;2015:253154. Epub 2015 Oct 5.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

Background. Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease that presents with varying dermatological and neurological symptoms. The leprosy reactions occur over the chronic course of the disease and lead to extensive disability and morbidity. Objective. To analyze and identify the risk factors which contribute to leprosy reactions. Methods. In a retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of leprosy patients registered at the leprosy clinic, Ramathibodi Hospital, Thailand, between March 1995 and April 2015. One hundred and eight patients were included; descriptive analysis was used for baseline characteristics and a binary logistic regression model was applied for identifying risk factors correlated with leprosy reactions. Results. Of the 108 cases analyzed, 51 were male and 57 were female. The mean age of presentation was 45 years. The borderline tuberculoid type was the most common clinical form. Leprosy reactions were documented in 61 cases (56.5%). The average time to reaction was 8.9 months. From multivariate analysis, risk factors for leprosy reactions were being female, positive bacillary index status, and MB treatment regimen. Conclusions. Leprosy reactions are common complications in leprosy patients. Being female, positive bacillary index status, and multibacillary treatment regimen are significantly associated with the reactions. Early detection in cases with risk factors followed by appropriate treatment could prevent the morbidity of leprosy patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/253154DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4609858PMC
October 2015

Usefulness of Random Skin Biopsy as a Diagnostic Tool of Intravascular Lymphoma Presenting With Fever of Unknown Origin.

Am J Dermatopathol 2015 Sep;37(9):686-90

*Dermatology Unit, Ramathibodi Hospital Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; and †Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston Salem, NC.

Background: Intravascular B-cell lymphoma (IVBCL) is a rare type of extranodal lymphoma in which the lymphoma proliferates within vascular lumen. One of the most common presenting symptoms is prolonged fever. Although examination of a random skin biopsy from healthy-appearing skin in patients with suspected intravascular lymphoma has been reported to be useful, the sensitivity of this method for diagnosis is still unknown.

Objective: To evaluate the usefulness of a random skin biopsy in the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma in the patient presenting with fever of unknown origin.

Materials And Methods: All cases that we performed random skin biopsy were retrospectively reviewed from March 2007 to June 2012 in Ramathibodi Hospital. The incisional biopsy technique was performed in 3 separate locations including 2 specimens from both upper thighs and 1 specimen from the abdomen.

Results: Of the 24 cases that were consulted to dermatologist for random skin biopsy, 3 cases (13%) were diagnosed of intravascular lymphoma and all presented with prolong fever, weight loss, and remarkable deterioration in Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (ECOG score) > 2. Interestingly, 2 cases (8%) were diagnosed with cytophagic histiocytic panniculitis from normal-appearing skin and subsequently investigated, which leads to the diagnosed of T-cell lymphoma.

Conclusions: In an elderly patient with fever of unknown origin and/or weight loss with no evident of skin lesion, markedly elevated lactate dehydrogenase, remarkable deterioration in ECOG performance status who suspected IVBCL should be consider to perform incisional random skin biopsy at least 3 specimens from both thighs and abdomen to achieve a high sensitivity. We propose that this technique may serve as an important diagnostic tool to obtain the diagnosis of IVBCL. In summary, 5 of 24 (21%) positive results from random skin biopsy helped diagnoses of lymphoma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DAD.0000000000000321DOI Listing
September 2015

Psoriasis or obesity is a risk factor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2014 Sep;71(3):588

Department of Dermatology Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2014.04.072DOI Listing
September 2014

Six-year retrospective review of drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms.

Acta Derm Venereol 2012 Mar;92(2):200-5

Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a rare, severe adverse drug reaction. The aim of this study was to characterize the aetiology, clinical features, laboratory findings, and management of patients with DRESS, diagnosed from January 2005 to April 2010 in a tertiary centre in Thailand. Twenty-seven patients were included in the study with a mean age of 52 years. Phenytoin, allopurinol, and nevirapine were the most commonly implicated medications. Mean duration of drug administration before the onset of symptoms was 34 days. The latent period was longer for allopurinol (103 days) and shorter for nevirapine (10 days). Skin rash was seen in all patients, while fever and lymphadenopathy were found in 88.9% and 22.2%, respectively. Hepatic and haematological involvement were the two most common systemic complications, occurring in 96.3% and 85.2%, respectively. Most patients were treated with systemic corticosteroids, for a mean duration of 49 days. The mortality rate in this study was 3.7%. Early detection and discontinuation of the suspected drug are the key steps of management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-1222DOI Listing
March 2012

Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection.

Case Rep Dermatol 2011 Feb 18;3(1):37-41. Epub 2011 Feb 18.

Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000324766DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3073751PMC
February 2011