Publications by authors named "Plearnpis Luxananil"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

An efficient ABC transporter signal peptide directs heterologous protein secretion in food-grade hosts.

World J Microbiol Biotechnol 2020 Sep 19;36(10):154. Epub 2020 Sep 19.

Microbial Cell Factory Research Team, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, 12120, Pathumthani, Thailand.

An efficient expression-secretion system for heterologous protein production in food-grade hosts, Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacillus subtilis, is still required to broaden their applications. The optimal signal peptide compatible with both the desired protein and the target host is important for the system. Here, we constructed new expression-secretion vectors to be used in both bacteria. A natural plasmid originating from food-grade L. plantarum BCC9546 was used as a core vector combined with a strong constitutive promoter, L-ldh promoter, and various signal peptides from several types of L. plantarum proteins: ABC transporter, cell wall-associated and extracellular proteins. A gene encoding 88-kDa amylase isolated from starch-related L. plantarum TBRC470 was used as a gene model to evaluate the systems. By comparing the amounts of secreted amylase from the recombinant strains to that of wild type, all signal peptides gave higher yields of secreted amylase in recombinant B. subtilis. Interestingly, two ABC transporter signal peptides from glutamine and mannose ABC transporters provided noticeably high levels of secreted amylase in recombinant L. plantarum. Moreover, these signal peptides also gave high yields of secreted amylase in recombinant B. subtilis. From the results, the signal peptide of glutamine ABC transporter, which functions in essential amino acid transportation that is a precursor for synthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds and nitrogen homeostasis, has a potential use in development of an efficient expression-secretion system for heterologous protein production in both food-grade hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11274-020-02932-0DOI Listing
September 2020

Modulation of Cas9 level for efficient CRISPR-Cas9-mediated chromosomal and plasmid gene deletion in Bacillus thuringiensis.

Biotechnol Lett 2020 Apr 20;42(4):625-632. Epub 2020 Jan 20.

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Khlong Nueng, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani, 12120, Thailand.

Objectives: To set up an efficient gene editing system in Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) using CRISPR-Cas9 by demonstrating deletion of chromosomal and plasmid genes.

Results: CRISPR-Cas9 from Streptococcus pyogenes was found to function in Bt cells, resulting in DNA cleavage that is lethal to the cells. The system was assessed for its ability to mediate gene editing by knock-out of the protease genes nprA (neutral protease A) and aprA (alkaline protease A). Gene editing was not detected when the Bacillus-derived pBCX was used to carry CRISPR-Cas9 elements and a DNA repair template. When the Cas9 promoter was replaced with the sporulation-specific promoter cyt2A, a Bt ∆nprA clone was obtained, but this plasmid construct did not give reproducible results. Bt ∆nprA ∆aprA and Bt ∆aprA deletion mutants were finally generated when the Lactobacillus plantarum-derived plasmid pLPPR9 was used, likely due to its lower copy number reducing Cas9 toxicity. Only three to four clones each needed to be screened to identify the desired gene-modified mutants. Conversely, efficient editing of the plasmid vip3A gene required the use of pBCX and longer homology sequences for the repair template.

Conclusions: Capitalizing on the differential impact of plasmid copy number and homology arm length, we devised distinct yet simple and efficient approaches to chromosomal and plasmid gene deletion for Bt that condense the screening process, minimize screening, and facilitate multiple consecutive gene editing steps.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10529-020-02809-0DOI Listing
April 2020

A novel salt-inducible vector for efficient expression and secretion of heterologous proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

J Biotechnol 2016 Mar 12;222:86-93. Epub 2016 Feb 12.

Microbial Cell Factory Laboratory, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113, Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand. Electronic address:

Bacillus subtilis is commonly used as a host for heterologous protein production via plasmid-based expression system. In order to improve product safety, avoid carbon catabolite repression and lower production cost, a novel salt-inducible vector, pSaltExSePR5, was developed based on a natural plasmid of Lactobacillus plantarum BCC9546. Salt-inducible promoter opuAA and a DNA fragment encoding a signal peptide of subtilisin E (SubE) were sequentially added to the core shuttle vector to facilitate expression and secretion of a target protein in B. subtilis. To evaluate the effectiveness of this system under salt induction, a protease gene from Halobacillus sp. without its native signal sequence was inserted in the pSaltExSePR5 plasmid downstream of SubE signal sequence and transformed into B. subtilis WB800. Protease activities from cell-free supernatants of the recombinant bacteria cultures induced with 0.5-6% NaCl were analyzed. The highest protease activity of 9.1 U/ml was obtained after induction with 4% NaCl, while the non-induced culture exhibited activity of 0.128 U/ml. The results demonstrated that pSaltExSePR5 provides an alternative vector for efficient and simple production of heterologous proteins in B. subtilis with a safer and more economic inducer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiotec.2016.02.019DOI Listing
March 2016

Synergism of regulatory elements in σ(B)- and σ(A)-dependent promoters enhances recombinant protein expression in Bacillus subtilis.

J Biosci Bioeng 2015 Oct 7;120(4):470-5. Epub 2015 Mar 7.

Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Mahidol University, Phutthamontol, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand. Electronic address:

Strong promoter is an essential factor for production of recombinant protein in various expression systems including Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we described a strategy to improve the expression efficiency using synthetic double promoter. Assembly of the conserved elements from σ(B)- and σ(A)-dependent promoters constitutively improved the yield of recombinant protein approximately 2-3-fold in both exponential and stationary growth phase. The synergistic effect in the double promoter was observed only when σ(B)-promoter was located upstream to σ(A)-promoter but independent to its orientation. A conserved element in either -10 or -35 box of σ(B)-promoter is sufficient to promote the synergism. Hence, this simple strategy of promoter engineering could be an effective way to generate a pool of strong constitutive promoters applicable for heterologous protein expression in B. subtilis in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiosc.2015.02.008DOI Listing
October 2015

Development of a multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA to identify four distinct species of tospovirus.

J Virol Methods 2014 Jun 15;202:54-63. Epub 2014 Mar 15.

Monoclonal Antibody Production Laboratory, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

In this study, a multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA was developed to detect and differentiate four tospovirus species found in Thailand, namely Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV), Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV), Tomato necrotic ringspot virus (TNRV), and Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV). In this system, nucleocapsid (N) gene fragments of four tospoviruses were simultaneously amplified and labeled with digoxigenin (DIG) in a single RT-PCR reaction using a pair of degenerate primers binding to the same conserved regions in all four tospovirus N genes. The DIG-labeled amplicons were distinguished into species by four parallel hybridizations to species-specific biotinylated probes in streptavidin-coated microtiter wells followed by ELISA detection using a peroxidase-conjugated anti-DIG antibody. Results indicated that the multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA assay could specifically identify each of these four tospoviruses without cross-reactivity between species or reactivity to healthy plant negative controls. Assay sensitivity was 10- to 1000-fold higher than conventional RT-PCR. When applied to naturally infected plants, all samples yielded concordant results between RT-PCR-ELISA and the reference RT-PCR. In conclusion, the multiplex RT-PCR-ELISA developed in this study has superior specificity, sensitivity, and high-throughput capacity compared to conventional RT-PCR and is an attractive alternative for the identification of different tospovirus species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jviromet.2014.03.003DOI Listing
June 2014

Novel and Highly Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Acidovorax citrulli and Development of ELISA-Based Detection in Cucurbit Leaves and Seed.

Plant Dis 2011 Sep;95(9):1172-1178

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

A novel monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to the seedborne bacterium Acidovorax citrulli was produced. MAb 11E5 reacted specifically with 19 strains of A. citrulli but not with three closely related bacteria in the family Comamonadaceae (i.e., A. facilis, Comamonas acidovorans, and C. testosteroni) and another seven phytopathogenic bacteria. Moreover, this MAb detected a strain of A. citrulli that was not detected by a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based kit and a commercial immunochromatographic strip test. In Western blot analysis, MAb 11E5 reacted with an A. citrulli protein of a molecular mass >170 kDa. MAb 11E5 was employed to develop two sandwich ELISA systems: MAb captured-sandwich ELISA (MC-sELISA) and polyclonal antibody captured-sandwich ELISA (PC-sELISA). MC-sELISA was 10 times more sensitive than PC-sELISA for detection of A. citrulli in cucurbit leaf and seed extracts. The detection limit of the MC-sELISA was 5 × 10 CFU/ml. Detection of A. citrulli in naturally infected cucurbit leaves, fruit, and seed was also feasible using MC-sELISA. The newly established MCsELISA provides another alternative for specific detection of A. citrulli in cucurbits and can be applied for routine field inspection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/PDIS-12-10-0889DOI Listing
September 2011

Bacillus siamensis sp. nov., isolated from salted crab (poo-khem) in Thailand.

Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2010 Oct 20;60(Pt 10):2364-2370. Epub 2009 Nov 20.

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, 113 Phaholyothin Rd, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

A Gram-positive, endospore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium, strain PD-A10(T), was isolated from salted crab (poo-khem) in Thailand and subjected to a taxonomic study. Phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, including phylogenetic analyses, showed that the novel strain was a member of the genus Bacillus. The novel strain grew in medium with 0-14 % (w/v) NaCl, at 4-55°C and at pH4.5-9. The predominant quinone was a menaquinone with seven isoprene units (MK-7). The major fatty acids were anteiso-C₁₅:₀ and anteiso-C₁₇:₀. Polar lipid analysis revealed the presence of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysylphosphatidylglycerol, glycolipid and unknown lipids. The DNA G+C content was 41.4 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain PD-A10(T) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRC 15535(T), Bacillus subtilis DSM 10(T), Bacillus vallismortis DSM 11031(T) and Bacillus mojavensis IFO 15718(T) were 99.5, 99.4, 99.4 and 99.2 %, respectively. Strain PD-A10(T) showed a low degree similarity of rep-PCR fingerprints and low DNA-DNA relatedness with the above-mentioned species. On the basis of the data gathered in this study, strain PD-A10(T) should be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus siamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PD-A10(T) (=BCC 22614(T)=KCTC 13613(T)).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/ijs.0.018879-0DOI Listing
October 2010

Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and associated risk factors in Nham, a Thai fermented pork product.

Food Microbiol 2009 Aug 5;26(5):547-51. Epub 2009 Mar 5.

Food Biotechnology Laboratory, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent bacterial pathogens causing food-borne disease worldwide. Staphylococcal food poisoning is caused by ingestion of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) pre-formed in the implicated food. In this study, the incidences of S. aureus and classical SEs (SEA-SEE) contamination in 'Nham', a traditional Thai fermented pork product, were determined. Among 155 Nham samples tested, as high as 39.35% of the samples were positive for S. aureus (2-3500 MPN/g), but none were positive for the SEs. The risk factors for S. aureus contamination were highly correlated with the manufacturer and the pH of the product. A predictive model determined the probability of the presence of S. aureus to be < or = 0.24 at the pH < or = 4.6. During the fermentation process, the number of S. aureus slightly increased in the first day and decreased afterward. S. aureus counts continued to decrease when Nham was stored refrigerated. The negative result for enterotoxins and low counts of S. aureus in Nham surveyed in this study, and reduction of the pathogen counts during fermentation and storage suggested that there is very low risk of staphylococcal food poisoning from consuming properly fermented Nham.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fm.2009.02.009DOI Listing
August 2009

Monitoring Lactobacillus plantarum BCC 9546 starter culture during fermentation of Nham, a traditional Thai pork sausage.

Int J Food Microbiol 2009 Feb 16;129(3):312-5. Epub 2008 Dec 16.

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), 113 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Road, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

The use of Lactobacillus plantarum BCC 9546 (LpBCC9546) as a starter culture for Nham, a traditional Thai fermented pork sausage ensures product quality and consistency. However, no direct evidence has confirmed the growth of this starter during Nham fermentation. In order to investigate its role during Nham fermentation, LpBCC9546 was genetically modified to distinguish it from the natural microflora in Nham. LpBCC9546 was transformed with a recombinant plasmid pRV85 to produce the recombinant strain LpG11, which is resistant to erythromycin and emits green fluorescence. LpG11 was used as a starter culture for Nham fermentation, and its growth was monitored by plating on a selective medium and assay of fluorescent activity. During Nham fermentation the numbers of LpG11 increased ten fold during the first 12 h of fermentation, reaching maximum numbers of between 10(7) and 10(8) cfu g(-1) after 24 h, and then declining after 60 h to 10(5) cfu g(-1) at 168 h. The growth of LpG11 starter culture during Nham fermentation was very similar to that of the untransformed LpBCC9546, although after a prolonged period of fermentation the recombinant LpG11 bacteria appeared to lose the plasmid, or were outgrown by naturally present L. plantarum. The acidity, texture and color of fermented Nham inoculated with recombinant LpG11 or untransformed LpBCC9546 were similar. These results indicated that the recombinant L. plantarum strain LpG11 is a suitable starter culture for Nham fermentation, and that the ability to monitor its growth directly during Nham fermentation could be exploited to further improve Nham production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijfoodmicro.2008.12.011DOI Listing
February 2009

Development of antibody array for simultaneous detection of foodborne pathogens.

Biosens Bioelectron 2009 Feb 26;24(6):1641-8. Epub 2008 Aug 26.

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, BIOTEC, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Pathumthani, Thailand.

Pathogenic bacterial contaminations present serious problems for food industry and public health. Rapid, accurate and affordable assays are needed. In this study, antibody arrays to simultaneously detect two foodborne pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp.) have been developed using chemiluminescent detecting system. Solid supports using nitrocellulose membrane and poly-l-lysine (PLL) glass slide were compared and optimized for antibody array construction. Many parameters including optimal concentrations of antibodies, blocking reagents, assay time, storage time, sensitivity and cross-reactivity were considered during optimization. This study revealed that the PLL slide was a more suitable support due to highly accurate results and the absence of non-specific background. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.2) and 3% skim milk in PBS buffer were optimal spotting and blocking reagents, respectively. With the same sensitivity for bacterial detection as in a conventional ELISA (10(5)-10(6)CFU/ml for the E. coli O157:H7 and 10(6)-10(7)CFU/ml for Salmonella detections), this antibody array has advantages of a much shorter assay time of 1h and much lower required amounts of antibodies. Moreover, there was no cross-reactivity in the detection among bacteria tested in this study. Bacteria detection in food sample was feasible as demonstrated using bacteria-added milk.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2008.08.026DOI Listing
February 2009

Cloning and characterization of a mosquito larvicidal toxin produced during vegetative stage of Bacillus sphaericus 2297.

Curr Microbiol 2004 Aug;49(2):84-8

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Paholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

The mosquitocidal toxin 1 (mtx1) gene from genomic DNA of B. sphaericus strain 2297 was cloned and expressed in E. coli. DNA sequencing analysis of the cloned gene revealed a single open reading frame encoding an 870-amino acid polypeptide. Expression level of the full-length gene in E. coli was very low even though strong promoter was used or the gene was expressed as a fusion protein. Expression level was highly improved after the putative leader sequence was deleted, and the truncated gene was expressed as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST-tMtx1). E. coli cells expressing GST-tMtx1 was highly toxic to Culex quinquefasciatus larvae and showed lower toxicity against Anopheles dirus and Aedes aegypti larvae. Enterobacter amnigenus An11, a mosquito larval gut colonizable bacteria, transformed with the cloned gene exhibited mosquito larvicidal activity. Result suggested that there is a potential to develop this protein to be used as an alternative mosquito control agent.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-004-4274-yDOI Listing
August 2004

Efficient expression of the mosquito larvicidal binary toxin gene from Bacillus sphaericus in Escherichia coli.

Curr Microbiol 2003 Nov;47(5):383-7

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Phaholyothin Road, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

The binary toxin gene encoding BinA (42 kDa) and BinB (51 kDa) from Bacillus sphaericus strain 2297 was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Low expression level was found when both proteins were expressed from a single operon. High expression was observed when the gene encoding an individual protein was placed downstream of the T7 promoter. The expression level of BinB was not different when expressed alone (non-fusion) or as a fusion form with T7 peptide (T7-BinB). Both forms of BinB were equally stable. Unlike BinB, the non-fusion form of BinA was less stable than T7-BinA. The mosquito larvicidal test showed that BinA or BinB alone was not toxic to mosquito larvae, but high toxicity was found when both BinA and BinB were applied. The results suggest that a short peptide of T7 linked to the N-terminus of either BinA or BinB does not affect their toxicity, but may make the toxin, especially BinA, more stable.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-003-4035-3DOI Listing
November 2003

Expression of binary toxin genes in the mosquito-colonizable bacteria, Bacillus cereus, leads to high toxicity against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

Curr Microbiol 2003 Nov;47(5):372-5

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Paholyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

Two B. cereus strains, Ae10 and Cx5, isolated from mosquito larval guts, were transformed with a recombinant plasmid, pBS373, harboring binary toxin genes from Bacillus sphaericus 2297. Immunoblotting analysis clearly revealed the production and presence of the 51-kDa toxin protein in both strains. Two recombinant B. cereus strains Ae10 and Cx5 showed very high toxicity against C. quinquefasciatus larvae. Since both strains have a close relationship with the mosquito larvae in the native environment and are capable of recolonizing in the guts of mosquito larvae, these strains can be considered promising new hosts for an effective delivery of mosquito-larvicidal toxins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-002-4026-9DOI Listing
November 2003

A plasmid encoding a combination of mosquito-larvicidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus sphaericus confers toxicity against a broad range of mosquito larvae when expressed in Gram-negative bacteria.

FEMS Microbiol Lett 2003 Nov;228(2):259-63

BIOTEC Central Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 113 Phaholyothin Rd, Klong 1, Klongluang, Pathumthani 12120, Thailand.

A recombinant plasmid harboring cry4A, cry4B and cry11A from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and binary toxin genes from Bacillus sphaericus has been constructed. The three cry genes were placed under the control of the cry4B promoter whereas the binary toxin gene was controlled by its native promoter. The expression of toxins in Escherichia coli harboring the resulting plasmid, p4BDA-5142, was investigated. Cry4B expression was highest compared to other toxins. Although the level of toxin expression was low compared with E. coli expressing single toxins, the recombinant E. coli strain harboring p4BDA-5142 exhibited broad range mosquito-larvicidal activity against all Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. This work has shown that the development of the recombinant plasmid can be used to broaden the host range spectrum of the appropriate bacterial host for mosquito control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0378-1097(03)00780-8DOI Listing
November 2003

Cloning and characterization of a cytolytic and mosquito larvicidal delta-endotoxin from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. darmstadiensis.

Curr Microbiol 2003 Feb;46(2):94-8

National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Rama 6 Road, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

The cytolytic delta-endotoxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. darmstadiensis was amplified from genomic DNA by PCR by using primers designed from the sequence of cyt2Aa1 gene of B. thuringiensis subsp. kyushuensis. DNA sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame translating to a 259-amino acid sequence. The cloned gene was designated cyt2Aa2. This gene was highly expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies that could be solubilized in 50 m M Na(2)CO(3), pH 10.5. Activation of the solubilized protoxin by proteinase K (1% wt/wt, proteinase K/protoxin) yielded the active fragment of about 23 kDa. Cyt2Aa2 showed high hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes (hemolytic end- point 0.25 microgram/ml) and was toxic to Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti larvae (LC(50) 0.5-1.0 microgram/ml).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00284-002-3823-5DOI Listing
February 2003