Publications by authors named "Piotr Burmistrz"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Possibility of using alternative fuels in Polish power plants in the context of mercury emissions.

Waste Manag 2021 May 14;126:578-584. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, Al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30- 059 Krakow, Poland.

The progressive decarbonisation of industry is leading to a reduction in coal consumption and the substitution for coal with other types of fuels, including waste-derived alternative fuels. These fuels are characterised by high variation in the content of highly toxic mercury. Co-combustion with coal can cause significant emissions, exceeding mercury emission limits. Various alternative fuels (refuse-derived fuel (RDF), waste paper, textiles, plastics, film, tires and their char, and sewage sludge) were examined for mercury content. The mercury content in analysed alternative fuels ranged from 0.4 to 92.0 µg Hg/MJ, with an average of 17.7 µg Hg/MJ. The fuels with the highest mercury content were RDFs (2.0-79.3 µg Hg/MJ) and sewage sludge (42.3-92.0 µg Hg/MJ). An acceptable amount of RDF added to hard coal which would remain within the emission limits was estimated to be 9-24% of the chemical energy in the blend. For sewage sludge, this amount was estimated to be 5-13%. For brown coal, with a much higher mercury content than hard coal, co-combustion with alternative fuels has a positive effect on reducing mercury emissions. It is possible to meet the mercury emission limits with a 95% contribution of the chemical energy coming from RDF. The blending of various types of waste supported by mild pyrolysis of high-mercury waste allows alternative fuels with relatively low mercury content to be produced. Such fuels may contribute a reduction in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants in Poland.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2021.03.053DOI Listing
May 2021

Method development and validation for total mercury determination in coke oven gas combining a trap sampling method with CVAAS detection.

Talanta 2018 Oct 31;188:293-298. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Coal Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, AGH - University of Science and Technology in Kraków, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków, Poland.

Coke oven gas is one of the by-products of the coal coking process. It is used as a fuel in the coking plant, but also as a raw material in the chemical industry to produce methanol, syngas or environment-friendly, low-CO hydrogen fuel. Due to the reasons mentioned above, the knowledge of coke oven gas pollutants such as mercury is a key issue. To determine the mercury in the cleaned coke oven gas a trap sampling method combined with CVAAS mercury detection was developed, optimized and validated. In order to perform the sampling process the traps filled with activated carbon were used. The determination of mercury in the traps material was performed by means of an MA-2 mercury analyzer. During the optimization of the method one selected the trap material, sample volume and flow rate. The optimal volume of the coke oven gas sample was 3 dm and the flow rate was 18 dm/h (per one trap). The developed method was validated according to the Eurachem recommendation and was applied to determine mercury in the clean coke oven gas. The coke oven gas sampling was performed in a coking plant in Poland. The average concentration of mercury in the clean coke oven gas was 3.2 ± 0.3 μg/m (k = 2) for n = 18.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2018.05.098DOI Listing
October 2018

Active methods of mercury removal from flue gases.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2019 Mar 23;26(9):8383-8392. Epub 2018 Mar 23.

Faculty of Energy and Fuels, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicz Avenue 30, 30-059, Krakow, Poland.

Due to its adverse impact on health, as well as its global distribution, long atmospheric lifetime and propensity for deposition in the aquatic environment and in living tissue, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has classified mercury and its compounds as a severe air quality threat. Such widespread presence of mercury in the environment originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Global anthropogenic emission of mercury is evaluated at 2000 Mg year. According to the National Centre for Emissions Management (Pol. KOBiZE) report for 2014, Polish annual mercury emissions amount to approximately 10 Mg. Over 90% of mercury emissions in Poland originate from combustion of coal.The purpose of this paper was to understand mercury behaviour during sub-bituminous coal and lignite combustion for flue gas purification in terms of reduction of emissions by active methods. The average mercury content in Polish sub-bituminous coal and lignite was 103.7 and 443.5 μg kg. The concentration of mercury in flue gases emitted into the atmosphere was 5.3 μg m for sub-bituminous coal and 17.5 μg m for lignite. The study analysed six low-cost sorbents with the average achieved efficiency of mercury removal from 30.6 to 92.9% for sub-bituminous coal and 22.8 to 80.3% for lignite combustion. Also, the effect of coke dust grain size was examined for mercury sorptive properties. The fine fraction of coke dust (CD) adsorbed within 243-277 μg Hg kg, while the largest fraction at only 95 μg Hg kg. The CD fraction < 0.063 mm removed almost 92% of mercury during coal combustion, so the concentration of mercury in flue gas decreased from 5.3 to 0.4 μg Hg m. The same fraction of CD had removed 93% of mercury from lignite flue gas by reducing the concentration of mercury in the flow from 17.6 to 1.2 μg Hg m. The publication also presents the impact of photochemical oxidation of mercury on the effectiveness of Hg vapour removal during combustion of lignite. After physical oxidation of Hg in the flue gas, its effectiveness has increased twofold.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-1772-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6469818PMC
March 2019

Coke dust enhances coke plant wastewater treatment.

Chemosphere 2014 Dec 12;117:278-84. Epub 2014 Aug 12.

AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy & Fuels, Mickiewicz Avenue 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland.

Coke plant wastewater contain many toxic pollutants. Despite physico-chemical and biological treatment this specific type of wastewater has a significant impact on environment and human health. This article presents results of research on industrial adsorptive coke plant wastewater treatment. As a sorbent the coke dust, dozen times less expensive than pulverized activated carbon, was used. Treatment was conducted in three scenarios: adsorptive after full treatment with coke dust at 15 g L(-1), biological treatment enhanced with coke dust at 0.3-0.5 g L(-1) and addition of coke dust at 0.3 g L(-1) prior to the biological treatment. The enhanced biological treatment proved the most effective. It allowed additional removal of 147-178 mg COD kg(-1) of coke dust.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.07.025DOI Listing
December 2014

Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coke plant wastewater.

Water Sci Technol 2013 ;68(11):2414-20

Microbiology Department, Faculty of Biochemistry Biophysics and Biotechnology, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow, Poland.

The subject of examinations presented in this paper is the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between solid and liquid phases in samples of raw wastewater and wastewater after treatment. The content of 16 PAHs according to the US EPA was determined in the samples of coke plant wastewater from the Zdzieszowice Coke Plant, Poland. The samples contained raw wastewater, wastewater after physico-chemical treatment as well as after biological treatment. The ΣPHA16 content varied between 255.050 μg L(-1) and 311.907 μg L(-1) in raw wastewater and between 0.940 and 4.465 μg L(-1) in wastewater after full treatment. Investigation of the distribution of PAHs showed that 71-84% of these compounds is adsorbed on the surface of suspended solids and 16-29% is dissolved in water. Distribution of individual PAHs and ΣPHA16 between solid phase and liquid phase was described with the use of statistically significant, linear equations. The calculated values of the partitioning coefficient Kp changed from 0.99 to 7.90 for naphthalene in samples containing mineral-organic suspension and acenaphthylene in samples with biological activated sludge, respectively.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2166/wst.2013.506DOI Listing
March 2014
-->