Publications by authors named "Pincan Su"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Polymorphism of Antifolate Drug Resistance in From Local Residents and Migrant Workers Returned From the China-Myanmar Border.

Front Cell Infect Microbiol 2021 24;11:683423. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Department of Pathogen Biology and Immunology, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China.

Drug-resistant  malaria impedes efforts to control, eliminate, and ultimately eradicate malaria in Southeast Asia. resistance to antifolate drugs derives from point mutations in specific parasite genes, including the dihydropteroate synthase (), dihydrofolate reductase (), and GTP cyclohydrolase I () genes. This study aims to investigate the prevalence and spread of drug resistance markers in populating the China-Myanmar border. Blood samples were collected from symptomatic patients with acute infection. Samples with single-clone infections were sequenced for and genesand genotyped for 6 flanking microsatellite markers. Copy number variation in the gene was also examined. Polymorphisms were observed in six different codons of the  gene (382, 383, 512, 549, 553, and 571) and six different codons of the  gene (13, 57, 58, 61, 99, 117) in two study sites. The quadruple mutant haplotypes 57I/L/58R/61M/117T of gene were the most common (comprising 76% of cases in Myitsone and 43.7% of case in Laiza). The double mutant haplotype 383G/553G of  gene was also prevalent at each site (40.8% and 31%). Microsatellites flanking the gene differentiated clinical samples from wild type and quadruple mutant genotypes ( = 0.259-0.3036), as would be expected for a locus undergoing positive selection. The lack of copy number variation of suggests that SP-resistant may harbor alternative mechanisms to secure sufficient folate.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2021.683423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8265503PMC
July 2021

Genetic polymorphisms in and are correlated with lung cancer risk in the Chinese Han population.

Cancer Manag Res 2019 11;11:5393-5401. Epub 2019 Jun 11.

Department of Transfusion Medicine, Shanxi Provincial People's Hospital, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710068, People's Republic of China.

Purpose: axis participates in the initiation and progression of lung cancer (LC). This study aimed to explore the potential influence of polymorphisms on LC risk.

Patients And Methods: In total, 1,010 participants (507 LC patients and 503 healthy controls) were enrolled. Five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in and one SNP in were genotyped in included samples with Agena MassARRAY system. OR and 95% CIs were computed by logistic regression analysis after adjusting for age and gender. Stratified analyses with demographic and clinical characteristics were also performed. Finally, linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis was conducted with the PLINK version 1.07 software .

Results: rs10053847 variant was related to a decreased LC risk under the allele gene (OR =0.78, =0.043) and additive model (OR =0.77, =0.042). The results of stratified analysis indicated that this SNP was associated with a lower LC risk among nonsmokers (AA/GG: OR =0.09, =0.033; AA/AG+GG: OR =0.10 =0.037) or nondrinkers (AA/GG: OR =0.07, =0.047; AA/AG+GG: OR =0.18 =0.049). Moreover, carriers of rs10213865-C allele had an increased lung adenocarcinoma risk (CA/AA: OR =1.60, =0.011; CC+CA/AA: OR =1.62, =0.007; CA/CA/AA: OR =1.50, =0.007). Additionally, AGAA haplotype (rs10213865, rs969129, rs118137916 and rs10053847) increased LC risk (OR =1.30, =0.041).

Conclusion: rs10053847 was correlated with a decreased LC risk, while rs10213865 was correlated with an elevated lung adenocarcinoma risk, implying these two SNPs might play essential roles in LC risk evaluation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S202839DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6572729PMC
June 2019

The novel KIR2DL4*038 allele identified by sequencing-based typing in a Chinese Naxi individual.

HLA 2019 08 22;94(2):186-187. Epub 2019 May 22.

Immunogenetics Laboratory, Shenzhen Blood Center, Shenzhen, China.

The novel KIR2DL4*038 allele differs from the closest allele KIR2DL4*00102 by a single missense mutation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tan.13570DOI Listing
August 2019

Identification of the novel KIR2DL4*036 allele in a Chinese Hani individual.

HLA 2019 08 29;94(2):182-184. Epub 2019 May 29.

Immunogenetics Laboratory, Shenzhen Blood Center, Shenzhen, China.

The novel KIR2DL4*036 allele differs from the closest allele KIR2DL4*00102 by a single missense mutation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tan.13574DOI Listing
August 2019

Characterization of the novel KIR2DL4*037 allele identified in a Chinese Hani individual.

HLA 2019 08 9;94(2):184-185. Epub 2019 May 9.

Immunogenetics Laboratory, Shenzhen Blood Center, Shenzhen, China.

The novel KIR2DL4*037 allele differs from the closest allele KIR2DL4*00501 by a single missense mutation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tan.13563DOI Listing
August 2019

Description of the novel KIR2DL4*00603 allele identified in a Chinese Hani individual.

HLA 2019 08 10;94(2):181-182. Epub 2019 May 10.

Immunogenetics Laboratory, Shenzhen Blood Center, Shenzhen, China.

The novel KIR2DL4*00603 allele differs from the closest allele KIR2DL4*00602 by a silent mutation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tan.13562DOI Listing
August 2019

Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations in southeast and western Myanmar.

Parasit Vectors 2017 Jul 4;10(1):322. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

Department of Pathogen Biology and Immunology, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China.

Background: The genetic diversity of malaria parasites reflects the complexity and size of the parasite populations. This study was designed to explore the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum populations collected from two southeastern areas (Shwekyin and Myawaddy bordering Thailand) and one western area (Kyauktaw bordering Bangladesh) of Myanmar.

Methods: A total of 267 blood samples collected from patients with acute P. falciparum infections during 2009 and 2010 were used for genotyping at the merozoite surface protein 1 (Msp1), Msp2 and glutamate-rich protein (Glurp) loci.

Results: One hundred and eighty four samples were successfully genotyped at three genes. The allelic distributions of the three genes were all significantly different among three areas. MAD20 and 3D7 were the most prevalent alleles in three areas for Msp1 and Msp2, respectively. The Glurp allele with a bin size of 700-750 bp was the most prevalent both in Shwekyin and Myawaddy, whereas two alleles with bin sizes of 800-850 bp and 900-1000 bp were the most prevalent in the western site Kyauktaw. Overall, 73.91% of samples contained multiclonal infections, resulting in a mean multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.94. Interestingly, the MOI level presented a rising trend with the order of Myawaddy, Kyauktaw and Shwekyin, which also paralleled with the increasing frequencies of Msp1 RO33 and Msp2 FC27 200-250 bp alleles. Msp1 and Msp2 genes displayed higher levels of diversity and higher MOI rates than Glurp. PCR revealed four samples (two from Shwekyin and two from Myawaddy) with mixed infections of P. falciparum and P. vivax.

Conclusions: This study genotyped parasite clinical samples from two southeast regions and one western state of Myanmar at the Msp1, Msp2 and Glurp loci, which revealed high levels of genetic diversity and mixed-strain infections of P. falciparum populations at these sites. The results indicated that malaria transmission intensity in these regions remained high and more strengthened control efforts are needed. The genotypic data provided baseline information for monitoring the impacts of malaria elimination efforts in the region.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2254-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5496439PMC
July 2017
-->