Publications by authors named "Piia Keskivali-Bond"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Mouse mutant phenotyping at scale reveals novel genes controlling bone mineral density.

PLoS Genet 2020 Dec 28;16(12):e1009190. Epub 2020 Dec 28.

German Mouse Clinic, Institute of Experimental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health GmbH, Neuherberg, Germany.

The genetic landscape of diseases associated with changes in bone mineral density (BMD), such as osteoporosis, is only partially understood. Here, we explored data from 3,823 mutant mouse strains for BMD, a measure that is frequently altered in a range of bone pathologies, including osteoporosis. A total of 200 genes were found to significantly affect BMD. This pool of BMD genes comprised 141 genes with previously unknown functions in bone biology and was complementary to pools derived from recent human studies. Nineteen of the 141 genes also caused skeletal abnormalities. Examination of the BMD genes in osteoclasts and osteoblasts underscored BMD pathways, including vesicle transport, in these cells and together with in silico bone turnover studies resulted in the prioritization of candidate genes for further investigation. Overall, the results add novel pathophysiological and molecular insight into bone health and disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1009190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7822523PMC
December 2020

A SLM2 Feedback Pathway Controls Cortical Network Activity and Mouse Behavior.

Cell Rep 2016 12;17(12):3269-3280

Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 3BZ, UK. Electronic address:

The brain is made up of trillions of synaptic connections that together form neural networks needed for normal brain function and behavior. SLM2 is a member of a conserved family of RNA binding proteins, including Sam68 and SLM1, that control splicing of Neurexin1-3 pre-mRNAs. Whether SLM2 affects neural network activity is unknown. Here, we find that SLM2 levels are maintained by a homeostatic feedback control pathway that predates the divergence of SLM2 and Sam68. SLM2 also controls the splicing of Tomosyn2, LysoPLD/ATX, Dgkb, Kif21a, and Cask, each of which are important for synapse function. Cortical neural network activity dependent on synaptic connections between SLM2-expressing-pyramidal neurons and interneurons is decreased in Slm2-null mice. Additionally, these mice are anxious and have a decreased ability to recognize novel objects. Our data reveal a pathway of SLM2 homeostatic auto-regulation controlling brain network activity and behavior.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2016.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5199341PMC
December 2016

Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System.

Front Behav Neurosci 2016 10;10:106. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Actual Analytics LtdEdinburgh, UK; School of Informatics, University of EdinburghEdinburgh, UK.

Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2016.00106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4901040PMC
July 2016

Prenatal development is linked to bronchial reactivity: epidemiological and animal model evidence.

Sci Rep 2014 Apr 17;4:4705. Epub 2014 Apr 17.

1] Clinical and Experimental Sciences Academic Unit, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine, Southampton, UK [2] Human Developmental and Health Academic Unit, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine, Southampton, UK [3].

Chronic cardiorespiratory disease is associated with low birthweight suggesting the importance of the developmental environment. Prenatal factors affecting fetal growth are believed important, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. The influence of developmental programming on bronchial hyperreactivity is investigated in an animal model and evidence for comparable associations is sought in humans. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed either control or protein-restricted diets throughout pregnancy. Bronchoconstrictor responses were recorded from offspring bronchial segments. Morphometric analysis of paraffin-embedded lung sections was conducted. In a human mother-child cohort ultrasound measurements of fetal growth were related to bronchial hyperreactivity, measured at age six years using methacholine. Protein-restricted rats' offspring demonstrated greater bronchoconstriction than controls. Airway structure was not altered. Children with lesser abdominal circumference growth during 11-19 weeks' gestation had greater bronchial hyperreactivity than those with more rapid abdominal growth. Imbalanced maternal nutrition during pregnancy results in offspring bronchial hyperreactivity. Prenatal environmental influences might play a comparable role in humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep04705DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3989559PMC
April 2014