Publications by authors named "Pieter H C Leliefeld"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A comprehensive three-dimensional assay to assess neutrophil defense against bacteria.

J Immunol Methods 2018 11 8;462:83-90. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Neutrophil antibacterial capacity is measured in animal models and in vitro as an important indicator of neutrophil function. To be able to extrapolate their conclusions, in vitro experiments should mimic the in vivo situation. In vivo, antibacterial capacity depends on multiple steps of bacterial sensing, priming, chemotaxis, phagocytosis and intracellular killing. Therefore, we developed a simply executed assay that involves multiple steps in one assay. The neutrophils were incorporated into a three-dimensional matrix of fibrin fibers, in which they could freely migrate. The fibrin matrix provided a more physiological representation of tissue structure than a shaken suspension and extended ex vivo survival of neutrophils. Staphylococci endogenously producing GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) provided a real-time quantification of the bacterial load without the need for lysing the fibrin matrix or counting of colony forming units on agar plates. The delay in bacterial outgrowth serves as a measure for the relative antibacterial capacity of the neutrophils. Additionally, neutrophil capacity could easily be measured high-throughput in a 96-wells format. In this new assay we study neutrophil behavior in a physiologically relevant setting and explore many functions of the neutrophil in a single test. The functional capacity of neutrophils from different in vitro treatments or different donors can directly be compared.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jim.2018.09.001DOI Listing
November 2018

Differential antibacterial control by neutrophil subsets.

Blood Adv 2018 06;2(11):1344-1355

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, and.

Neutrophils comprise a heterogeneous population of cells essential for bacterial eradication, and defects in neutrophil function are associated with increased susceptibility to infection. In this study, neutrophils from healthy controls were shown to prevent bacterial proliferation for at least 48 hours when cocultured with methicillin-resistant (MRSA) in tissue-like scaffolds by establishing a bacteriostatic environment inside their phagolysosome. This intracellular bacterial containment is independent of reactive oxygen species because neutrophils that lack a functional nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase complex displayed no defect in intracellular bacterial containment, whereas killing of the pathogen was impaired. During acute inflammation, a subset of CD16/CD62L hypersegmented neutrophils displayed normal phagocytosis associated with a remarkably poor capacity to contain bacteria intracellularly. Conversely, CD16-banded neutrophils were the only neutrophil subset that adequately contained MRSA. These findings demonstrate a clear neutrophil heterogeneity in their antimicrobial capacity and the appearance of neutrophil subsets with a clear differentiation in functionality during acute inflammation. Furthermore, this study provides an evolutionary basis for the rapid release of banded neutrophils into the circulation during acute inflammation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2017015578DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998927PMC
June 2018

Reversal of Sepsis-Like Features of Neutrophils by Interleukin-1 Blockade in Patients With Systemic-Onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

Arthritis Rheumatol 2018 06 7;70(6):943-956. Epub 2018 May 7.

University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Objective: Neutrophils are the most abundant innate immune cells in the blood, but little is known about their role in (acquired) chronic autoinflammatory diseases. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of neutrophils in systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), a prototypical multifactorial autoinflammatory disease that is characterized by arthritis and severe systemic inflammation.

Methods: Fifty patients with systemic-onset JIA who were receiving treatment with recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1Ra; anakinra) were analyzed at disease onset and during remission. RNA sequencing was performed on fluorescence-activated cell-sorted neutrophils from 3 patients with active systemic-onset JIA and 3 healthy controls. Expression of activation markers, apoptosis, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and degranulation of secretory vesicles from neutrophils were assessed by flow cytometry in serum samples from 17 patients with systemic-onset JIA and 15 healthy controls.

Results: Neutrophil counts were markedly increased at disease onset, and this correlated with the levels of inflammatory mediators. The neutrophil counts normalized within days after the initiation of rIL-1Ra therapy. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed a substantial up-regulation of inflammatory processes in neutrophils from patients with active systemic-onset JIA, significantly overlapping with the transcriptome of sepsis. Correspondingly, neutrophils from patients with active systemic-onset JIA displayed a primed phenotype that was characterized by increased ROS production, CD62L shedding, and secretory vesicle degranulation, which was reversed by rIL-1Ra treatment in patients who had achieved clinical remission. Patients with a short disease duration had high neutrophil counts, more immature neutrophils, and a complete response to rIL-1Ra, whereas patients with symptoms for >1 month had normal neutrophil counts and an unsatisfactory response to rIL-1Ra. In vitro, rIL-1Ra antagonized the priming effect of IL-1β on neutrophils from healthy subjects.

Conclusion: These results strongly support the notion that neutrophils play an important role in systemic-onset JIA, especially in the early inflammatory phase of the disease. The findings also demonstrate that neutrophil numbers and the inflammatory activity of systemic-onset JIA are both susceptible to IL-1 blockade.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.40442DOI Listing
June 2018

The role of neutrophils in immune dysfunction during severe inflammation.

Crit Care 2016 Mar 23;20:73. Epub 2016 Mar 23.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Critically ill post-surgical, post-trauma and/or septic patients are characterised by severe inflammation. This immune response consists of both a pro- and an anti-inflammatory component. The pro-inflammatory component contributes to (multiple) organ failure whereas occurrence of immune paralysis predisposes to infections. Strikingly, infectious complications arise in these patients despite the presence of a clear neutrophilia. We propose that dysfunction of neutrophils potentially increases the susceptibility to infections or can result in the inability to clear existing infections. Under homeostatic conditions these effector cells of the innate immune system circulate in a quiescent state and serve as the first line of defence against invading pathogens. In severe inflammation, however, neutrophils are rapidly activated, which affects their functional capacities, such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, intra-cellular killing, NETosis, and their capacity to modulate adaptive immunity. This review provides an overview of the current understanding of neutrophil dysfunction in severe inflammation. We will discuss the possible mechanisms of downregulation of anti-microbial function, suppression of adaptive immunity by neutrophils and the contribution of neutrophil subsets to immune paralysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13054-016-1250-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4804478PMC
March 2016

How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

Front Immunol 2015 14;6:471. Epub 2015 Sep 14.

Laboratory of Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , Netherlands ; Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , Netherlands.

Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2015.00471DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4568410PMC
October 2015