Publications by authors named "Pierre Ratinaud"

10 Publications

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Hearing aid acquisition and ownership: what can we learn from online consumer reviews?

Int J Audiol 2021 Jun 13:1-10. Epub 2021 Jun 13.

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.

Objective: To explore the publicised opinions of consumers actively participating in online hearing aid reviews.

Design: A retrospective design examining data generated from an online consumer review website (www.HearingTracker.com). Qualitative data (open text responses) were analysed using the open source automated topic modelling software IRaMuTeQ (http://www.iramuteq.org/) to identify themes. Outputs were compared with quantitative data from the consumer reviews (short response questions exploring hearing aid performance and benefit, and some meta-data such as hearing aid brand and years of hearing aid ownership).

Study Sample: 1378 online consumer hearing aid reviews.

Results: Six clusters within two domains were identified. The domain Device Acquisition included three clusters: The domain Device Use included three clusters: ; and .

Conclusions: Although online hearing aid consumers indicate positive performance on multiple-choice questions relating to hearing aid performance and benefit, their online reviews describe a number of barriers limiting their success. Hearing healthcare clinicians must employ a personalised approach to audiological rehabilitation to ensure individual clients' needs are met.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2021.1931487DOI Listing
June 2021

Social representation of hearing aids among people with hearing loss: an exploratory study.

Int J Audiol 2021 Mar 2:1-15. Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX, USA.

Objective: The aim of the current study was to examine the social representation (SR) of hearing aids in people with hearing loss (PHL) in India, the Republic of Korea (ROK), the United Kingdom (UK), and the United States of America (US).

Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design. The data collected by using a free association task were analysed qualitatively (i.e. content analysis) and quantitatively (i.e. chi-square analysis, similarities analysis, prototypical analysis).

Study Sample: 424 participants with hearing loss.

Results: The most commonly reported categories across all countries were "beneficial," "cost and time," and "appearance and design." Approximately 50% of the associations reported were negative. There were variations in terms of the categories that were predominant in the SR of each country. "Others actions and attitude" category was predominantly reported by PHL in India. "Disturbance" and "dissatisfaction" of hearing aids and the "repairs and maintenance of hearing aids" categories were mainly reported from the ROK and the US, respectively.

Conclusions: The current results highlight the main aspects that PHL report spontaneously when they think about hearing aids. The findings will help to further inform public health campaigns and will contribute to develop culturally appropriate media materials regarding hearing aids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2021.1886349DOI Listing
March 2021

Social Representation of "Hearing Loss" Among People with Hearing Loss: An Exploratory Cross-Cultural Study.

J Am Acad Audiol 2020 11 15;31(10):725-739. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Vision and Hearing Sciences Research Centre, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Background: Hearing loss can have an effect on the physical, psychosocial, and cognitive wellbeing of an individual. Despite the research on attitudes and stigma associated with hearing loss, people with hearing loss (PHL) continue to delay seeking help. Thus, it is vital to look at alternative theories which have been successfully used in disability research to better understand how PHL perceive hearing loss.

Purpose: The aim of the current exploratory study was to examine the social representation (SR) of "hearing loss" in PHL in India, Republic of Korea (ROK), United Kingdom (UK), and the United States (US).

Research Design: The study used a cross-sectional survey design.

Study Sample: In this study, 424 participants were recruited using a consecutive sampling method in four countries (India, Republic of Korea, United Kingdom, and United States).

Data Collection And Analysis: Data collection was conducted using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using content analysis, similarities analysis, prototypical analysis, and chi-square analysis.

Results: The free associations of the PHL were grouped into 37 categories. The most commonly reported categories were and . Similarities analysis and prototypical analysis highlighted two main negative categories () which form the central elements of SR of hearing loss. PHL associated hearing loss mainly as a negative phenomenon, but with some positive and neutral aspects. Respondents from ROK reported a greater number of neutral associations compared with other countries. There were cross-cultural similarities and differences in terms of PHL's SR of hearing loss, but there were more similarities than differences.

Conclusion: The study provides an insight into how PHL collectively view their "hearing loss" and helps to develop our understanding of the influence of culture on the SR of "hearing loss." The results will aid the development of culturally appropriate public education campaigns, marketing material, and appropriate rehabilitation for PHL.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0040-1719127DOI Listing
November 2020

Young Adults' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding "Music" and "Loud Music" Across Countries: Applications of Social Representations Theory.

Front Psychol 2019 25;10:1390. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.

Exposure to loud music, especially by young people, has significantly increased in recent years as a result of (a) advancements in technology in terms of personal music players and smart mobile phones, and (b) streaming of music through these devices. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that some 1.1 billion teenagers and young adults are at risk of developing hearing loss due to exposure to recreational noise such as music. It is suggested that knowledge and attitude of young adults toward music has bearing upon their music listening habits and thereby influences who is at risk of developing music induced hearing loss. Hence, researchers from various fields have tried to understand the knowledge and attitude of young adults regarding loud music. However, there is some criticism of attitude studies as there is little relation between expressed attitude and behavior. Some recent studies have explored the social representations of music and loud music using the Social Representations Theory (SRT). It has been suggested that social representation is more fundamental than attitude (or in other words social representation informs attitude), hence, it has a better relation to behavior. The current paper: (1) provides an overview of studies on knowledge and attitude of young adults toward loud music, (2) discusses the limitations of attitude theories and introduces SRT, and (3) provides a summary of social representation studies on "music" and "loud music" in young adults from different countries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01390DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6603271PMC
June 2019

Benefits and Shortcomings of Direct-to-Consumer Hearing Devices: Analysis of Large Secondary Data Generated From Amazon Customer Reviews.

J Speech Lang Hear Res 2019 05;62(5):1506-1516

LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, France.

Purpose The current study was aimed at understanding the benefits and shortcomings of direct-to-consumer hearing devices (DCHDs) by analyzing the large text corpus of secondary data generated from Amazon customer reviews. Method Secondary data were generated manually by gathering user feedback for 62 different DCHDs (cost range: $9.95-$635) on the Amazon.com website, which included 11,258 unique Amazon-verified customer reviews. The data were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative analyses methods. Results The cluster analysis of large data corpus resulted in 7 unique clusters, which were labeled as (a) Issues related to fit and comfort (15%), (b) Friends and family recommendations (11.8%), (c) Issues related to sound quality (11.9%), (d) Listening and conversation (16.1%), (e) Positive customer service (12.1%), (f) General usage and customer service (14.7%), and (g) Cost and affordability (17.3%). Exploratory analysis also revealed an association between customer ratings and cost in relation to these clusters (i.e., customer reviews). For example, customer reviews about cheaper DCHDs are related to issues about sound quality, whereas reviews about expensive DCHDs are related to cost and affordability of the device. The qualitative content analysis resulted in 8 main themes, which include (a) intrinsic factors, (b) extrinsic factors, (c) supplemental items, (d) ease of use, (e) interaction with support services, (f) reasons for purchase, (g) experiences, and (h) general information. Conclusions The study using the text mining techniques highlights the benefits and shortcomings of DCHDs that are currently available in the U.S. market. Our findings relate well to the published study results of electroacoustic analysis on similar products, which provide clinicians with knowledge related to DCHDs that they can convey to consumers during clinical consultations. The findings may also be of interest to the hearing instrument industry from the perspective of developing products based on user feedback.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0370DOI Listing
May 2019

Representation of Hearing Loss and Hearing Aids in the U.S. Newspaper Media: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Secondary Data.

Am J Audiol 2019 Mar;28(1):11-25

Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Lamar University, Beaumont, TX.

Purpose News media plays an important role in formulating people's knowledge and opinions about various aspects of life, including health. The current study explored how hearing loss and hearing aids are represented in the U.S. newspaper media. Method A cross-sectional study design was selected to analyze publicly available newspaper media data. The data sets were generated from the database, the U.S. Major Dailies by ProQuest, by searching key words for newspapers published during 1990-2017. Cluster analysis (i.e., text pattern analysis) and chi-square tests were performed using Iramuteq software. Results The hearing loss data set had 1,527 texts (i.e., articles). The cluster analysis resulted in 7 clusters, which were named as (1) causes and consequences (26.1%), (2) early identification and diagnosis (9%), (3) health promotion and prevention (22.1%), (4) recreational noise exposure (10.4%), (5) prevalence (14.3%), (6) research and development (12.4%), and (7) cognitive hearing science (5.6%). The hearing aids data set had 2,667 texts. The cluster analysis resulted in 8 clusters, which were named as (1) signal processing (20.2%), (2) insurance (8.9%), (3) prevalence (12.4%), (4) research and development (5.4%), (5) activities and relation (16.2%), (6) features to address background noise (13.8%), (7) innovation (12%), and (8) wireless and connectivity (11.1%). Time series analysis of clusters in both "hearing loss" and "hearing aids" data sets indicated changes in the pattern of information presented in the newspaper media during 1990-2016 (e.g., Cluster 7 focuses on cognitive hearing science in a hearing loss data set emerging only since the year 2012 and growing rapidly). Conclusions The text pattern analysis showed that the U.S. newspaper media focuses on a range of issues when considering hearing loss and hearing aids and that patterns or trends change over time. The study results can be helpful for hearing health care professionals to understand what presuppositions society in general may have as the media has the ability to influence societal perception and opinions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1044/2018_AJA-18-0058DOI Listing
March 2019

Patterns in the social representation of "hearing loss" across countries: how do demographic factors influence this representation?

Int J Audiol 2018 12;57(12):925-932

h The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Örebro University , Örebro , Sweden.

This study aims to understand patterns in the social representation of hearing loss reported by adults across different countries and explore the impact of different demographic factors on response patterns. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Data were collected using a free association task and analysed using qualitative content analysis, cluster analysis and chi-square analysis. The study sample included 404 adults (18 years and over) in the general population from four countries (India, Iran, Portugal and UK). The cluster analysis included 380 responses out of 404 (94.06%) and resulted in five clusters. The clusters were named: (1) individual aspects; (2) aetiology; (3) the surrounding society; (4) limitations and (5) exposed. Various demographic factors (age, occupation type, education and country) showed an association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters. The study results suggest that how hearing loss is represented in adults in general population varies and is mainly related to country of origin. These findings strengthen the argument about cross-cultural differences in perception of hearing loss, which calls for a need to make necessary accommodations while developing public health strategies about hearing loss.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2018.1516894DOI Listing
December 2018

Representation of Tinnitus in the US Newspaper Media and in Facebook Pages: Cross-Sectional Analysis of Secondary Data.

Interact J Med Res 2018 May 8;7(1):e9. Epub 2018 May 8.

Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.

Background: When people with health conditions begin to manage their health issues, one important issue that emerges is the question as to what exactly do they do with the information that they have obtained through various sources (eg, news media, social media, health professionals, friends, and family). The information they gather helps form their opinions and, to some degree, influences their attitudes toward managing their condition.

Objective: This study aimed to understand how tinnitus is represented in the US newspaper media and in Facebook pages (ie, social media) using text pattern analysis.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based upon secondary analyses of publicly available data. The 2 datasets (ie, text corpuses) analyzed in this study were generated from US newspaper media during 1980-2017 (downloaded from the database US Major Dailies by ProQuest) and Facebook pages during 2010-2016. The text corpuses were analyzed using the Iramuteq software using cluster analysis and chi-square tests.

Results: The newspaper dataset had 432 articles. The cluster analysis resulted in 5 clusters, which were named as follows: (1) brain stimulation (26.2%), (2) symptoms (13.5%), (3) coping (19.8%), (4) social support (24.2%), and (5) treatment innovation (16.4%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated a change in the pattern of information presented in newspaper media during 1980-2017 (eg, more emphasis on cluster 5, focusing on treatment inventions). The Facebook dataset had 1569 texts. The cluster analysis resulted in 7 clusters, which were named as: (1) diagnosis (21.9%), (2) cause (4.1%), (3) research and development (13.6%), (4) social support (18.8%), (5) challenges (11.1%), (6) symptoms (21.4%), and (7) coping (9.2%). A time series analysis of clusters indicated no change in information presented in Facebook pages on tinnitus during 2011-2016.

Conclusions: The study highlights the specific aspects about tinnitus that the US newspaper media and Facebook pages focus on, as well as how these aspects change over time. These findings can help health care providers better understand the presuppositions that tinnitus patients may have. More importantly, the findings can help public health experts and health communication experts in tailoring health information about tinnitus to promote self-management, as well as assisting in appropriate choices of treatment for those living with tinnitus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2196/ijmr.9065DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5964301PMC
May 2018

Examination of Previously Published Data to Identify Patterns in the Social Representation of 'Hearing Aids' Across Countries.

J Audiol Otol 2018 Apr 26;22(2):96-104. Epub 2018 Feb 26.

The Department of Health and Welfare Studies, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.

Background And Objectives: Societal factors seem to exercise a strong influence on hearing aid uptake, use, and satisfaction. In particular, knowledge, perception, and attitude of people will have bearing towards their and others health behavior and decisions. The current study aimed at understanding the perception of hearing aids by adults belonging to the general population in different countries.

Subjects And Methods: The study employed a crosssectional design. A sample of 404 adults from India, Iran, Portugal, and the United Kingdom were recruited by relying on a convenience sampling. Previously published data was re-analyzed but it was applied for different approach. Free association task was used to collect the data. They were asked to provide up to five words or phrases that come to mind when thinking about "hearing aids." The data was initially analyzed based on qualitative content analysis. This was followed by quantitative cluster analysis and chi square analysis.

Results: The content analysis suggested 39 main categories of responses related to hearing aids. The cluster analysis resulted in five main clusters, namely: 1) positive attitude, 2) external factors, 3) hearing aid use and satisfaction, 4) etiology, and 5) benefits and limitations of technology. A few demographic factors (i.e., education, occupation type, country) showed association with different clusters, although country of origin seemed to be associated with most clusters.

Conclusions: The study provides us with unique insights into the perception of hearing aids by the general public, and additionally, the way demographic variables may influence these perceptions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7874/jao.2017.00318DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5894490PMC
April 2018

Examination of previously published data to identify patterns in the social representation of "Loud music" in young adults across countries.

Noise Health 2018 Jan-Feb;20(92):16-22

LERASS Laboratory, University of Toulouse, Toulouse, France.

Purpose: The current study was aimed at understanding the patterns in the social representation of loud music reported by young adults in different countries.

Materials And Methods: The study included a sample of 534 young adults (18-25 years) from India, Iran, Portugal, United Kingdom, and United States. Participants were recruited using a convince sampling, and data were collected using the free association task. Participants were asked to provide up to five words or phrases that come to mind when thinking about "loud music." The data were first analyzed using the qualitative content analysis. This was followed by quantitative cluster analysis and chi-square analysis.

Results: The content analysis suggested 19 main categories of responses related to loud music. The cluster analysis resulted in for main clusters, namely: (1) emotional oriented perception; (2) problem oriented perception; (3) music and enjoyment oriented perception; and (4) positive emotional and recreation-oriented perception. Country of origin was associated with the likelihood of participants being in each of these clusters.

Conclusion: The current study highlights the differences and similarities in young adults' perception of loud music. These results may have implications to hearing health education to facilitate healthy listening habits.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/nah.NAH_21_17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5843985PMC
August 2019
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