Publications by authors named "Pierluigi D"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[The utility of assaying the N-terminal of brain natriuretic peptide precursor (NT pro-BNP) to predict the clinical outcome in patients with supraventricular tachyarrhythmias observed and treated in the emergency room].

Recenti Prog Med 2008 Mar;99(3):141-5

Struttura Complessa di Medicina e Chirurgia d'Accettazione e di Urgenza, Pronto Soccorso ed Osservazione Breve, Ospedale Galliera, Genova.

Many patients arrive at the emergency room (ER) with recent-onset atrial fibrillation or other forms of supraventricular tachyarrhythmia (SV Ta) or tachycardia. The restoration of sinus rhythm (SR) is always desirable and, in addition, can enable many hospitalisations to be avoided, thereby achieving considerable savings in financial and healthcare resources. Even in haemodynamically stable cases, it is clearly useful to be able to evaluate which subjects will benefit most from attempts to restore SR, even when few truly diagnostic means are on hand (such as echocardiography, which is not always promptly available in the ER setting). We evaluated the brain natriuretic peptide precursor (N terminal pro-BNP) in 105 patients arriving at the ER. We observed that SR was restored in a low percentage of patients with values > 4500, while the vast majority of those with values < 1500 was normalised even by means of antiarrhythmic drugs alone. It is therefore probable that a medium-low value of the hormone indicates only an acute response to the distension of the atrial tissue induced by the arrhythmia; by contrast, decidedly elevated values are probably also caused by ventricular dysfunction and therefore indicate a lesser likelihood of restoring SR. The routine evaluation of NT pro-BNP could be used as an alternative to echocardiography in order to rapidly select patients in whom cardioversion should be attempted in the ER or Brief Observation Unit.
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March 2008

Fludarabine in combination with cyclophosphamide or with cyclophosphamide plus mitoxantrone for relapsed or refractory low-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Haematologica 2001 Mar;86(3):282-6

Divisione di Ematologia, Azienda Ospedaliera S. Martino, Ospedale S. Martino, largo Rosanna Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa, Italy.

Background And Objectives: We report the activity of two combinations of fludarabine (FLU), one with cyclophosphamide (FLU/CY) and the second with CY plus mitoxantrone (FLU/CY/MITO). The aim of the study was to evaluate the activity and toxicity of these two schedules in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL).

Design And Methods: Twenty-two patients with recurrent low grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (LGL) received FLU/CY (FLU 25 mg/m(2) days 1 to 3, CY 300 mg/m(2) days 1 to 3), and 31 patients received FLU/CY/MITO (FLU 25 mg/m(2) days 1 to 3, CY 300 mg/m(2) days 1 to 3, mitoxantrone 10 mg/m(2) day 1). Patients received antibiotic oral prophylaxis during all treatments and growth factors (G-CSF) when grade III granulocytopenia (WHO scale) occurred.

Results: Of the 53 patients, 31 achieved complete remission (CR) (58%) and 16 partial remission (PR) (30%). Response was similar in both arms of the study. After 3 courses, 77% of patients who achieved CR showed a complete disappearance of disease. Seventy-nine per cent of patients experienced granulocytopenia. Few patients had fever, all without infection. One patient died with fever of unknown origin three months after completion of six courses of treatment.

Interpretation And Conclusions: Both treatments were seen to be effective in recurrent low-grade NHL. Antibiotic prophylaxis with G-CSF support seems to reduce treatment-related infection.
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March 2001

Mobilization/transplantation of peripheral blood progenitor cells for aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with marrow involvement.

Leukemia 1996 Jun;10 Suppl 2:s88-91

Department of Hematology, Ospedale S Martino, Genova, Italy.

Thirty-five aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) with marrow involvement received high-dose cyclophosphamide (7 g/m2) and G-CSF in order to collect peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC). Fourteen patients were in partial remission, 16 patients were in relapse ('sensitive', 12; 'resistant', 4) and five patients were refractory to conventional treatment. A good yield of PBPC was obtained in 30 patients, while a low number of CD34+ cells and of CFU-GM was seen in two cases. Two patients entered progression and one patient died. Thirty patients underwent PBPC autografting. Twenty-nine out of 35 (83%) patients entered complete remission (CR). Two patients died in CR of infection following marrow aplasia 3 and 6 months after autografting. At 3 years the probability of survival and disease-free survival (DFS) are 62 and 51%, respectively.
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June 1996

Twelve years experience with high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for high-risk Hodgkin's disease patients in first remission after MOPP/ABVD chemotherapy.

Leuk Lymphoma 1996 Mar;21(1-2):63-70

Hematology and Autografting Unit, Anatomia Patologica, Ospedale San Martino, Genova, Italy.

High-dose therapy followed by autografting can cure patients with aggressive Hodgkin's disease (HD) refractory or with early relapse to first-line combination chemotherapy. On the other hand, the eradication of the disease is rarely achieved in heavily pretreated patients. It has been suggested that patients with HD with very high risk characteristics at diagnosis, often relapse despite appropriate therapy with 7-8 drugs combination. Thus it seems to us that such patients are potential candidates for early autografting during first remission. Twelve years ago, we initiated a pilot study to investigate whether patients with very high risk characteristics, would benefit from early autografting. The application of early autografting was compared with our historical group of patients in complete remission after receiving MOPP/ABVD, who had the same negative prognostic characteristics, refused autografting and who did not receive other treatment after achieving complete remission. Among the 22 consecutive patients entered into the pilot study and autografted, 18 are alive and 17 (77%) remain alive in unmaintained remission at a median of 86 months. One patient (4%) died of interstitial pneumonitis in the transplantation group. Only 8/24 (33%) patients, who did not receive an autograft, are currently alive and disease free at a median of 89 months. In conclusion, the early application of autografting appears to improve the outcome in patients with very high risk HD who achieved remission with MOPP/ABVD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428199609067581DOI Listing
March 1996

Mobilization of cytogenetically 'normal' blood progenitors cells by intensive conventional chemotherapy for chronic myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Leuk Lymphoma 1993 Apr;9(6):477-83

Division of Hematology I, Ospedale S. Martino, Genova, Italy.

Various lines of evidence suggest that substantial numbers of very primitive normal hematopoietic cells persist in the marrow of most patients with CML, despite the presence of an expanded Philadelphia-Chromosome (Ph) positive population, and that normal clones might, in certain circumstances, have a proliferative advantage over leukemic populations. We have recently demonstrated in 5/8 CML patients with blastic phase (BP) that the blood progenitor cells/(BPC) harvested during early recovery from marrow aplasia were Ph-negative on cytogenetic analysis, suggesting that leukapheresis may provide a useful source of 'normal' progenitors for subsequent reinfusions. We report here an update on 40 patients with Ph + CML and 9 patients with ALL in first or subsequent relapses with associated cytogenetic translocations including t(8;14) t(4;8) t(4;11) and t(9;22). All these patients received intensive conventional chemotherapy and during early recovery from marrow aplasia, when the WBC reached 0.5-2.0 x 10(9)/L, BPC were collected by 4-8 leukapheresis and tested for the persistence of the marker translocations and, when possible, for the presence of the hybrid bcr/abl transcripts by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In seven out of 10 patients with chronic phase CML, BPC were Ph-negative and in 5 PCR negative. In both accelerated phase patients, BPC were Ph-negative but PCR-positive and in eight out of 28 blastic CML patients, BPC were Ph-negative and in two cases also PCR-negative. Six out of 9 ALL patients, lost the cytogenic translocations. After complete recovery, 16 patients were subsequently given high-dose therapy followed by reinfusion of 'normal' BPC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428199309145754DOI Listing
April 1993

Autologous bone marrow transplantation as adjuvant treatment for high-risk Hodgkin's disease in first complete remission after MOPP/ABVD protocol.

Bone Marrow Transplant 1991 Aug;8(2):99-103

Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Ospedale S. Martino, Genoa, Italy.

Fifteen patients with very poor prognosis Hodgkin's disease in remission after MOPP/ABVD regimen, were treated with high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous marrow transplantation (ABMT) immediately after achieving complete remission (CR). Thirteen patients (86.6%) remain alive in unmaintained CR at a median time of 36 months (range 10-64 months) post-transplant. In the other two patients reasons for failure included relapse of Hodgkin's disease (one patient) and death due to interstitial pneumonitis secondary to carmustine therapy. These patients were compared with a historical control group consisting of 24 patients with the same poor prognostic factors, who achieved CR with MOPP/ABVD and did not receive other treatment. Eight out of 24 patients (33%) remain alive and well in unmaintained CR at a median time of 42 months (range 19-83 months). The administration of MOPP/ABVD combined with HDC and ABMT was not associated with an increased incidence of major toxicity. The results achieved support the early sequential treatment of a highly effective drug combination followed by HDC/ABMT that can substantially improve the likelihood of cure in these advanced stage very poor prognosis Hodgkin's disease patients.
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August 1991

[Chronic myeloid leukemia. New prospects for marrow autotransplantation].

Haematologica 1991 Jun;76 Suppl 3:337-51

Terapia Intensiva Oncoematologia, Ospedale S. Martino, Genova.

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June 1991

Autologous Unpurged Bone Marrow Transplantation for Acute Non Lymphoblastic Leukemia in First Remission.

Leuk Lymphoma 1991 ;5(1):43-7

b Division of Hematology I, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy.

Forty consecutive adult patients under the age of 50 with acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) in first complete remission, underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) between March 1984 and April 1990. The conditioning regimen employed included cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation, followed by the administration of unpurged ABMT. The median time from diagnosis to transplant was 7 months (3-15 months), and the median time from complete remission to ABMT was 4 months (range 3-9 months). Twenty-two (51%) patients remain in complete remission 6-81 months (median 24 months) after ABMT. The causes of death were, recurrent leukemia (11 patients), parenchymal toxicities such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and veno-occlusive disease (3 patients), hemorrhage (2 patients) and infection (2 patients). Eleven patients relapsed after 3-12 months (median 5 months). This study has produced survival data comparable to those of other institutions employing TBI for either allo or autotransplants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428199109068103DOI Listing
July 2016

Autologous bone marrow transplantation for adult advanced stage lymphoblastic lymphoma in first CR. A study of the NHLCSG.

Leukemia 1991 ;5 Suppl 1:42-5

Division of Hematology, Ospedale S. Martino, Genoa, Italy.

Fourty successive adult patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma entered a study of sequential chemotherapy consisting of an intensive LSA-L2-type protocol to induce first complete remission. Twenty-one patients in first CR (median age 24 years, range 15-43), after receiving a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation, underwent autologous bone marrow transplantation. At this time fourteen patients are alive and well 5-72 months post-transplant (median follow-up 58 months) with an actuarial disease free survival of 66%. These early results suggest that high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation may improve long-term disease free survival in advanced stage adult lymphoblastic lymphoma.
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October 1991