Publications by authors named "Philip Dujardin"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Statins affect cancer cell plasticity with distinct consequences for tumor progression and metastasis.

Cell Rep 2021 Nov;37(8):110056

Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen at the University Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) partner site Essen, Essen, Germany. Electronic address:

Statins are among the most commonly prescribed drugs, and around every fourth person above the age of 40 is on statin medication. Therefore, it is of utmost clinical importance to understand the effect of statins on cancer cell plasticity and its consequences to not only patients with cancer but also patients who are on statins. Here, we find that statins induce a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in cancer cells of solid tumors. Using a comprehensive STRING network analysis of transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome data combined with multiple mechanistic in vitro and functional in vivo analyses, we demonstrate that statins reduce cellular plasticity by enforcing a mesenchymal-like cell state that increases metastatic seeding ability on one side but reduces the formation of (secondary) tumors on the other due to heterogeneous treatment responses. Taken together, we provide a thorough mechanistic overview of the consequences of statin use for each step of cancer development, progression, and metastasis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2021.110056DOI Listing
November 2021

Unraveling Tumor Heterogeneity by Using DNA Barcoding Technologies to Develop Personalized Treatment Strategies in Advanced-Stage PDAC.

Cancers (Basel) 2021 Aug 20;13(16). Epub 2021 Aug 20.

West German Cancer Center, Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Essen at the University Duisburg-Essen, 45147 Essen, Germany.

Tumor heterogeneity is a hallmark of many solid tumors, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and an inherent consequence of the clonal evolution of cancers. As such, it is considered the underlying concept of many characteristics of the disease, including the ability to metastasize, adapt to different microenvironments, and to develop therapy resistance. Undoubtedly, the high mortality of PDAC can be attributed to a high extent to these properties. Despite its apparent importance, studying tumor heterogeneity has been a challenging task, mainly due to its complexity and lack of appropriate methods. However, in recent years molecular DNA barcoding has emerged as a sophisticated tool that allows mapping of individual cells or subpopulations in a cell pool to study heterogeneity and thus devise new personalized treatment strategies. In this review, we provide an overview of genetic and non-genetic inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity and its impact on (personalized) treatment strategies in PDAC and address how DNA barcoding technologies work and can be applied to study this clinically highly relevant question.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers13164187DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8394487PMC
August 2021

Barcoding Technology for Multiplexed Analysis of Metastatic Ability In Vivo.

Methods Mol Biol 2021 ;2294:239-251

Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen at the University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.

DNA barcoding allows the quantitative, biomarker-free tracking of individual cell populations in mixed/heterogeneous cell pools. Here, we describe a multiplexed in vivo screening platform based on DNA barcoding technology to interrogate compound libraries for their effect on metastatic seeding in vivo. We apply next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to quantitatively analyze high-throughput compound screening in mice. Up to 96 compounds and controls can be screened for their effect on metastatic ability in a single mouse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1350-4_17DOI Listing
June 2021

Altered Mitochondria Functionality Defines a Metastatic Cell State in Lung Cancer and Creates an Exploitable Vulnerability.

Cancer Res 2021 02 25;81(3):567-579. Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, University Hospital Essen at the University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.

Lung cancer is a prevalent and lethal cancer type that leads to more deaths than the next four major cancer types combined. Metastatic cancer spread is responsible for most cancer-related deaths but the cellular changes that enable cancer cells to leave the primary tumor and establish inoperable and lethal metastases remain poorly understood. To uncover genes that are specifically required to sustain metastasis survival or growth, we performed a genome-scale pooled lentiviral-shRNA library screen in cells that represent nonmetastatic and metastatic states of lung adenocarcinoma. Mitochondrial ribosome and mitochondria-associated genes were identified as top gene sets associated with metastasis-specific lethality. Metastasis-derived cell lines and metastases analyzed from an autochthonous lung cancer mouse model had lower mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced mitochondrial functionality than nonmetastatic primary tumors. Electron microscopy of metastases uncovered irregular mitochondria with bridging and loss of normal membrane structure. Consistent with these findings, compounds that inhibit mitochondrial translation or replication had a greater effect on the growth of metastasis-derived cells. Finally, mice with established tumors developed fewer metastases upon treatment with phenformin . These results suggest that the metastatic cell state in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with a specifically altered mitochondrial functionality that can be therapeutically exploited. SIGNIFICANCE: This study characterizes altered mitochondria functionality of the metastatic cell state in lung cancer and opens new avenues for metastasis-specific therapeutic targeting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-20-1865DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8137518PMC
February 2021
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