Publications by authors named "Pham Thi Dau"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in airborne particulate matter samples from Hanoi, Vietnam: Particle size distribution, aryl hydrocarbon ligand receptor activity, and implication for cancer risk assessment.

Chemosphere 2021 Oct 30;280:130720. Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi, 11400, Viet Nam. Electronic address:

Concentrations and profiles of unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and Me-PAHs) were analyzed in airborne particulate matter (PM) samples collected from high-traffic roads in Hanoi urban area. Levels of PAHs and Me-PAHs ranged from 210 to 660 (average 420) ng/m in total PM, and these pollutants were mainly associated with fine particles (PM) rather than coarser ones (PM and PM). Proportions of high-molecular-weight compounds (i.e., 5- and 6-ring) increased with decreasing particle size. Benzo[b+k]fluoranthene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, and benzo[ghi]perylene were the most predominant compounds in the PM samples. In all the samples, Me-PAHs were less abundant than unsubstituted PAHs. The PAH-CALUX assays were applied to evaluate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand activities in crude extracts and different fractions from the PM samples. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalents (BaP-EQs) derived by the PAH-CALUX assays for low polar fractions (mainly PAHs and Me-PAHs) ranged from 300 to 840 ng/m, which were more consistent with theoretical values derived by using PAH-CALUX relative potencies (270-710 ng/m) rather than conventional toxic equivalency factor-based values (22-69 ng/m). Concentrations of PAHs and Me-PAHs highly correlated with bioassay-derived BaP-EQs. AhR-mediated activities of more polar compounds and interaction effects between PAH-related compounds were observed. By using PAH-CALUX BaP-EQs, the ILCR values ranged from 1.0 × 10 to 2.8 × 10 for adults and from 6.4 × 10 to 1.8 × 10 for children. Underestimation of cancer risk can be eliminated by using effect-directed method (e.g., PAH-CALUX) rather than chemical-specific approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.130720DOI Listing
October 2021

Soil and sediment contamination by unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an informal e-waste recycling area, northern Vietnam: Occurrence, source apportionment, and risk assessment.

Sci Total Environ 2020 Mar 5;709:135852. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), VNU University of Science, Vietnam National University, Hanoi, 334 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi, Viet Nam. Electronic address:

Improper processing activities of e-waste are potential sources of polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives, however, information about the environmental occurrence and adverse impacts of these toxic substances is still limited for informal e-waste recycling areas in Vietnam and Southeast Asia. In this study, unsubstituted and methylated PAHs were determined in surface soil and river sediment samples collected from a rural village with informal e-waste recycling activities in northern Vietnam. Total levels of PAHs and MePAHs decreased in the order: workshop soil (median 2900; range 870-42,000 ng g) > open burning soil (2400; 840-4200 ng g) > paddy field soil (1200; range 530-6700 ng g) > river sediment samples (750; 370-2500 ng g). About 60% of the soil samples examined in this study were heavily contaminated with PAHs. Fingerprint profiles of PAHs and MePAHs in the soil and sediment samples indicated that these pollutants were mainly released from pyrogenic sources rather than petrogenic sources. The emissions of PAHs and MePAHs in this area were probably attributed to uncontrolled burning of e-waste and agricultural by-products, domestic coal and biomass combustion, and traffic activities. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of PAHs in the e-waste workshop soils were significantly higher than those of the field soils; however, the incremental lifetime cancer risk of PAH-contaminated soils in this study ranged from 5.5 × 10 to 4.6 × 10, implying acceptable levels of human health risk. Meanwhile, concentrations of some compounds such as phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene in several soil samples exceeded the maximum permissible concentrations, indicating the risk of ecotoxicological effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.135852DOI Listing
March 2020

Quantitative analysis of the interaction of constitutive androstane receptor with chemicals and steroid receptor coactivator 1 using surface plasmon resonance biosensor systems: a case study of the Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) and the mouse.

Toxicol Sci 2013 Jan 26;131(1):116-27. Epub 2012 Sep 26.

Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan.

The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) not only displays a high basal transcriptional activity but also acts as a ligand-dependent transcriptional factor. It is known that CAR exhibits different ligand profiles across species. However, the mechanisms underlying CAR activation by chemicals and the species-specific responses are not fully understood. The objectives of this study are to establish a high-throughput tool to screen CAR ligands and to clarify how CAR proteins from the Baikal seal (bsCAR) and the mouse (mCAR) interact with chemicals and steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1). We developed the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) system to assess quantitatively the interaction of CAR with potential ligands and SRC1. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of bsCAR and mCAR was synthesized in a wheat germ cell-free system. The purified CAR LBD was then immobilized on the sensor chip for the SPR assay, and the kinetics of direct interaction of CARs with ligand candidates was measured. Androstanol and androstenol, estrone, 17β-estradiol, TCPOBOP, and CITCO showed compound-specific but similar affinities for both CARs. The CAR-SRC1 interaction was ligand dependent but exhibited a different ligand profile between the seal and the mouse. The results of SRC1 interaction assay accounted for those of our previous in vitro CAR-mediated transactivation assay. In silico analyses also supported the results of CAR-SRC1 interaction; there is little structural difference in the ligand-binding pocket of bsCAR and mCAR, but there is a distinct discrimination in the helix 11 and 12 of these receptors, suggesting that the interaction of ligand-bound CAR and SRC1 is critical for determining species-specific and ligand-dependent transactivation over the basal activity. The SPR assays demonstrated a potential as a high-throughput screening tool of CAR ligands.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/toxsci/kfs288DOI Listing
January 2013