Publications by authors named "Peter K Kind"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Age structure of the Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri).

PLoS One 2019 23;14(1):e0210168. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

The Australian lungfish has been studied for more than a century without any knowledge of the longevity of the species. Traditional methods for ageing fish, such as analysis of otolith (ear stone) rings is complicated in that lungfish otoliths differ from teleost fish in composition. As otolith sampling is also lethal, this is not appropriate for a protected species listed under Australian legislation. Lungfish scales were removed from 500 fish from the Brisbane, Burnett and Mary rivers. A sub-sample of scales (85) were aged using bomb radiocarbon techniques and validated using scales marked previously with oxytetracycline. Lungfish ages ranged from 2.5-77 years of age. Estimated population age structures derived using an Age Length Key revealed different recruitment patterns between river systems. There were statistically significant von Bertalanffy growth model parameters estimated for each of the three rivers based on limited sample sizes. In addition, length frequency distributions between river systems were also significantly different. Further studies will be conducted to review drivers that may explain these inter-river differences.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0210168PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343868PMC
September 2019

Monitoring age-related trends in genomic diversity of Australian lungfish.

Mol Ecol 2018 Jul 10. Epub 2018 Jul 10.

Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Nathan, Qld, Australia.

An important challenge for conservation science is to detect declines in intraspecific diversity so that management action can be guided towards populations or species at risk. The lifespan of Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri) exceeds 80 years, and human impacts on breeding habitat over the last half century may have impeded recruitment, leaving populations dominated by old postreproductive individuals, potentially resulting in a small and declining breeding population. Here, we conduct a "single-sample" evaluation of genetic erosion within contemporary populations of the Australian lungfish. Genetic erosion is a temporal decline in intraspecific diversity due to factors such as reduced population size and inbreeding. We examined whether young individuals showed signs of reduced genetic diversity and/or inbreeding using a novel bomb radiocarbon dating method to age lungfish nonlethally, based on C ratios of scales. A total of 15,201 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) loci were genotyped in 92 individuals ranging in age from 2 to 77 years old. Standardized individual heterozygosity and individual inbreeding coefficients varied widely within and between riverine populations, but neither was associated with age, so perceived problems with recruitment have not translated into genetic erosion that could be considered a proximate threat to lungfish populations. Conservation concern has surrounded Australian lungfish for over a century. However, our results suggest that long-lived threatened species can maintain stable levels of intraspecific variability when sufficient reproductive opportunities exist over the course of a long lifespan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/mec.14791DOI Listing
July 2018

Extremely low microsatellite diversity but distinct population structure in a long-lived threatened species, the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi).

PLoS One 2015 8;10(4):e0121858. Epub 2015 Apr 8.

Seqwater, Ipswich, Queensland, Australia.

The Australian lungfish is a unique living representative of an ancient dipnoan lineage, listed as 'vulnerable' to extinction under Australia's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Historical accounts indicate this species occurred naturally in two adjacent river systems in Australia, the Burnett and Mary. Current day populations in other rivers are thought to have arisen by translocation from these source populations. Early genetic work detected very little variation and so had limited power to answer questions relevant for management including how genetic variation is partitioned within and among sub-populations. In this study, we use newly developed microsatellite markers to examine samples from the Burnett and Mary Rivers, as well as from two populations thought to be of translocated origin, Brisbane and North Pine. We test whether there is significant genetic structure among and within river drainages; assign putatively translocated populations to potential source populations; and estimate effective population sizes. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci genotyped in 218 individuals gave an average within-population heterozygosity of 0.39 which is low relative to other threatened taxa and for freshwater fishes in general. Based on FST values (average over loci = 0.11) and STRUCTURE analyses, we identify three distinct populations in the natural range, one in the Burnett and two distinct populations in the Mary. These analyses also support the hypothesis that the Mary River is the likely source of translocated populations in the Brisbane and North Pine rivers, which agrees with historical published records of a translocation event giving rise to these populations. We were unable to obtain bounded estimates of effective population size, as we have too few genotype combinations, although point estimates were low, ranging from 29 - 129. We recommend that, in order to preserve any local adaptation in the three distinct populations that they be managed separately.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0121858PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4390199PMC
April 2016

Physiological responses to prolonged aquatic hypoxia in the Queensland lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri.

Respir Physiol Neurobiol 2002 Aug;132(2):179-90

Department of Zoology and Entomology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.

The effects of moderate and severe hypoxia on air breathing frequency and respiratory properties of the blood of the Queensland (Australian) lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri were measured in fish exposed to these conditions for 14-22 days at 20 degrees C. Haemoglobin oxygen affinity increased after exposure to moderate hypoxia (PW(O(2)) = 60 mmHg), but did not increase further after exposure to severe hypoxia (PW(O(2)) = 40 mmHg). The P(50) of whole blood (20 degrees C, P(CO(2)) = 16.0 mmHg) fell from 22.0 +/- 1.5 mmHg in normoxic conditions to 19.0 +/- 1.0 mmHg in hypoxic conditions. Under both moderate and severe hypoxia, haematocrit, haemoglobin, blood lactate, and erythrocyte phosphate concentrations did not differ from normoxic values. The observed increase in haemoglobin oxygen affinity in response to aquatic hypoxia is typical of compensatory responses seen in obligate water breathers, but smaller. This suggests that the capacity of lungfish to respond to hypoxia by breathing air removes the necessity for further left-shifting of the oxygen equilibrium curve.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s1569-9048(02)00113-1DOI Listing
August 2002
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