Publications by authors named "Peter B George"

2 Publications

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Adverse outcome in aortic sclerosis is associated with coronary artery disease and inflammation.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2004 Jan;43(2):169-75

Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073, USA.

Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the presence of aortic sclerosis, serologic markers of inflammation, and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

Background: Aortic sclerosis is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the mechanism by which such nonobstructive valve lesions impart excess cardiovascular risk has not been delineated.

Method: In 425 patients (mean age 68 +/- 15 years, 54% men) presenting to the emergency room with chest pain, we studied the relationship among aortic sclerosis, the presence and acuity of coronary artery disease, serologic markers of inflammation, and cardiovascular outcomes. Patients underwent echocardiography and serologic testing including C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic valves were graded for the degree of sclerosis, and cardiovascular outcomes including cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed over one year.

Results: Aortic sclerosis was identified in 203 patients (49%), whereas 212 (51%) had normal aortic valves. On univariate analysis at one year, patients with aortic sclerosis had a higher incidence of cardiovascular events (16.8% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.002) and worse event-free survival (normal valves = 93%, mild aortic sclerosis = 85%, and moderate to severe aortic sclerosis = 77%, p = 0.002). However, by multivariable analysis aortic sclerosis was not independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes; the only independent predictors of cardiac death or MI at one year were coronary artery disease (hazard ratio [HR] 3.23, p = 0.003), MI at index admission (HR 2.77, p = 0.008), ascending tertiles of CRP (HR 2.2, p = 0.001), congestive heart failure (HR 2.15, p = 0.02) and age (HR 1.03, p = 0.04).

Conclusions: The increased incidence of adverse cardiovascular events in patients with aortic sclerosis is associated with coronary artery disease and inflammation, not a result of the effects of valvular heart disease per se.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2003.08.036DOI Listing
January 2004

Optimal glycemic control is associated with a lower rate of target vessel revascularization in treated type II diabetic patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

J Am Coll Cardiol 2004 Jan;43(1):8-14

Division of Cardiology and Biostatistics, Mid America Heart Institute, St. Luke's Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.

Objectives: We examined the association between glycemic control determined by preprocedural hemoglobin A1c (A1c) and the incidence of target vessel revascularization (TVR) in diabetic patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Background: Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have increased rates of restenosis and a worse clinical outcome after PCI than patients without DM.

Methods: A total of 239 patients (60 without DM and 179 with DM) were enrolled in this study. Optimal glycemic control was defined as A1c < or =7%, and suboptimal control was defined as A1c >7%. Follow-up was performed at six and 12 months after the index intervention.

Results: Diabetic patients with optimal glycemic control had a rate of 12-month TVR similar to that of nondiabetic patients (15% vs. 18%, p = NS). Diabetic patients with A1c >7% had a significantly higher rate of TVR than those with A1c <7% (34% vs. 15%, p = 0.02). In a multiple logistic regression analysis, A1c >7% was a significant independent predictor of TVR (odds ratio 2.87, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 7.24; p = 0.03). Optimal glycemic control was associated with a lower rate of cardiac rehospitalization (15% vs. 31%, p = 0.03) and recurrent angina (13% vs. 37%, p = 0.002) at 12-month follow-up.

Conclusions: In diabetic patients undergoing elective PCI, optimal glycemic control (A1c < or =7%) is associated with a lower rate of TVR, cardiac rehospitalization, and recurrent angina. These data suggest that aggressive treatment of DM to achieve A1c < or =7% is beneficial in improving the clinical outcome after PCI.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2003.06.019DOI Listing
January 2004
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