Publications by authors named "Pengya Xue"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Aging-dependent regulatory cells emerge in subcutaneous fat to inhibit adipogenesis.

Dev Cell 2021 Apr 9. Epub 2021 Apr 9.

Department of Nutritional Sciences & Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Endocrinology Program, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. Electronic address:

Adipose tissue mass and adiposity change throughout the lifespan. During aging, while visceral adipose tissue (VAT) tends to increase, peripheral subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) decreases significantly. Unlike VAT, which is linked to metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, SAT has beneficial effects. However, the molecular details behind the aging-associated loss of SAT remain unclear. Here, by comparing scRNA-seq of total stromal vascular cells of SAT from young and aging mice, we identify an aging-dependent regulatory cell (ARC) population that emerges only in SAT of aged mice and humans. ARCs express adipose progenitor markers but lack adipogenic capacity; they secrete high levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines, including Ccl6, to inhibit proliferation and differentiation of neighboring adipose precursors. We also found Pu.1 to be a driving factor for ARC development. We identify an ARC population and its capacity to inhibit differentiation of neighboring adipose precursors, correlating with aging-associated loss of SAT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2021.03.026DOI Listing
April 2021

SnRK1 Phosphorylates and Destabilizes WRKY3 to Enhance Barley Immunity to Powdery Mildew.

Plant Commun 2020 Jul 9;1(4):100083. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

State Key Laboratory of Plant Cell and Chromosome Engineering, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Innovation Academy for Seed Design, Beijing 100101, China.

Plants recognize pathogens and activate immune responses, which usually involve massive transcriptional reprogramming. The evolutionarily conserved kinase, Sucrose non-fermenting-related kinase 1 (SnRK1), functions as a metabolic regulator that is essential for plant growth and stress responses. Here, we identify barley SnRK1 and a WRKY3 transcription factor by screening a cDNA library. SnRK1 interacts with WRKY3 in yeast, as confirmed by pull-down and luciferase complementation assays. Förster resonance energy transfer combined with noninvasive fluorescence lifetime imaging analysis indicates that the interaction occurs in the barley nucleus. Transient expression and virus-induced gene silencing analyses indicate that WRKY3 acts as a repressor of disease resistance to the fungus. Barley plants overexpressing have enhanced fungal microcolony formation and sporulation. Phosphorylation assays show that SnRK1 phosphorylates WRKY3 mainly at Ser83 and Ser112 to destabilize the repressor, and WRKY3 non-phosphorylation-null mutants at these two sites are more stable than the wild-type protein. SnRK1-overexpressing barley plants display enhanced disease resistance to . Transient expression of SnRK1 reduces fungal haustorium formation in barley cells, which probably requires SnRK1 nuclear localization and kinase activity. Together, these findings suggest that SnRK1 is directly involved in plant immunity through phosphorylation and destabilization of the WRKY3 repressor, revealing a new regulatory mechanism of immune derepression in plants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xplc.2020.100083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7747994PMC
July 2020

Enhancer reprogramming driven by high-order assemblies of transcription factors promotes phenotypic plasticity and breast cancer endocrine resistance.

Nat Cell Biol 2020 06 18;22(6):701-715. Epub 2020 May 18.

Department of Molecular Medicine, Mays Cancer Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Acquired therapy resistance is a major problem for anticancer treatment, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Using an established breast cancer cellular model, we show that endocrine resistance is associated with enhanced phenotypic plasticity, indicated by a general downregulation of luminal/epithelial differentiation markers and upregulation of basal/mesenchymal invasive markers. Consistently, similar gene expression changes are found in clinical breast tumours and patient-derived xenograft samples that are resistant to endocrine therapies. Mechanistically, the differential interactions between oestrogen receptor α and other oncogenic transcription factors, exemplified by GATA3 and AP1, drive global enhancer gain/loss reprogramming, profoundly altering breast cancer transcriptional programs. Our functional studies in multiple culture and xenograft models reveal a coordinated role of GATA3 and AP1 in re-organizing enhancer landscapes and regulating cancer phenotypes. Collectively, our study suggests that differential high-order assemblies of transcription factors on enhancers trigger genome-wide enhancer reprogramming, resulting in transcriptional transitions that promote tumour phenotypic plasticity and therapy resistance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41556-020-0514-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7737911PMC
June 2020

Draft genome of the wheat A-genome progenitor Triticum urartu.

Nature 2013 Apr 24;496(7443):87-90. Epub 2013 Mar 24.

State Key Laboratory of Plant Cell and Chromosome Engineering, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world. However, the complex polyploid nature of its genome makes genetic and functional analyses extremely challenging. The A genome, as a basic genome of bread wheat and other polyploid wheats, for example, T. turgidum (AABB), T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m)A(m)), is central to wheat evolution, domestication and genetic improvement. The progenitor species of the A genome is the diploid wild einkorn wheat T. urartu, which resembles cultivated wheat more extensively than do Aegilops speltoides (the ancestor of the B genome) and Ae. tauschii (the donor of the D genome), especially in the morphology and development of spike and seed. Here we present the generation, assembly and analysis of a whole-genome shotgun draft sequence of the T. urartu genome. We identified protein-coding gene models, performed genome structure analyses and assessed its utility for analysing agronomically important genes and for developing molecular markers. Our T. urartu genome assembly provides a diploid reference for analysis of polyploid wheat genomes and is a valuable resource for the genetic improvement of wheat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11997DOI Listing
April 2013