Publications by authors named "Pedro de Souza Quevedo"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Another Piece of the Puzzle: Echinococcus oligarthrus Recorded in Jaguarundis (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) in Southern Brazil.

J Wildl Dis 2021 Oct;57(4):936-941

Postgraduate Program in Animal Biodiversity, Federal University of Santa Maria, Avenida Roraima, 1000, Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, 97105-900, Brazil.

Echinococcus oligarthrus is a tapeworm endemic to South America and widely distributed in the Amazon region. Its lifecycle is maintained by relationships between felids and their prey, mainly small sylvatic rodents, but humans can be infected occasionally. We report two female jaguarundis (Herpailurus yagouaroundi) harboring E. oligarthrus in southern Brazil. The felines were found road killed in periurban areas, and, during necropsy, the small intestine was examined. Visual inspection revealed helminths, which were submitted to microscopy and molecular examination. Morphologically, they were around 2.5 mm long, with four suckers and an armed scolex with two rows of hooks. Phylogenetic reconstruction using cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene sequences placed samples from south Brazil in the same clade as all other E. oligarthrus samples, but as a sister group. Genetic distance gave similar results, resulting in a divergence of 0.087% between the samples described in this study and other samples. The geographic pattern of genetic diversity, as assessed by analysis of molecular variance, suggests that the divergency results from isolation by distance. This finding expands the geographic range of E. oligarthrus and brings new insights to help understand and prevent the zoonosis it causes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/JWD-D-20-00208DOI Listing
October 2021

Biliary Fascioliasis: A Scare During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

ACG Case Rep J 2021 Jul 21;8(7):e00630. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Gastroenterology Department, School of Medicine, University of Passo Fundo, Passo Fundo, RS, Brazil.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.14309/crj.0000000000000630DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8297722PMC
July 2021

Amorimia exotropica poisoning as a presumptive cause of myocardial fibrosis in cattle.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2011 Nov;23(6):1226-9

Laboratório Regional de Diagnóstico, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Faculdade de Veterinária, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

The current study reports the investigation on the cause of sudden deaths associated with cardiac fibrosis in cattle in northern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The exclusion of known causes of bovine cardiac fibrosis as well as the absence of the plants in that region whose consumption has already been linked to the disorder motivated this investigation. The condition, which was attributed to the consumption of Amorimia exotropica, affected draft oxen, most of which died suddenly without showing any clinical signs during usual management or work. Globular hearts with white foci at their cut surfaces were the main gross findings, which corresponded microscopically from multifocal to coalescent areas of myocardial fibrosis. To confirm the condition, A. exotropica from the ranches where cattle died from the disease was dosed to rabbits, which showed similar lesions to those seen in dead cattle after receiving 10 doses of 3.6 g/kg at 4-day intervals. Electron microscopy on rabbit tissues revealed severe tumefaction of the cardiomyocytes associated with mitochondrial swelling, displacement, and rupture of the mitochondrial crests, and of the bundles of myofibrils, apart from large glycogen deposits within the sarcoplasm. It is suggested that mitochondrial changes triggered alterations that lead to cardiac fibrosis and that all of these changes were induced by A. exotropica cardiotoxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638711425586DOI Listing
November 2011
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