Publications by authors named "Pedro Carreiro-Martins"

17 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[ARIA 2019: An Integrated Care Pathway for Allergic Rhinitis in Portugal].

Acta Med Port 2021 Feb 4;34(2):144-157. Epub 2020 Dec 4.

MACVIA-France. Fondation Partenariale FMC VIA-LR. Centre Hospitalier Arnaud de Villeneuve. Montpellier. INSERM U 1168. Université Versailles St-Quentin-en-Yvelines. Montigny le Bretonneux. France. Charité. Universitätsmedizin Berlin. Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. Berlin. Alemanha.

The Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) initiative started more than 20 years ago and has developed and disseminated evidence-based guidelines and projects in the field of allergic rhinitis. This initiative is currently focused on providing patient-centred guidelines that contribute to an integrated care pathway between the various levels of care and take advantage of digital solutions, and the introduction of integrated care pathways in clinical practice has been recommended. In this article we describe the adaptation for Portugal of the ARIA Integrated Care Pathways document. After a brief review of the epidemiology and impact of allergic rhinitis in Portugal and the activities carried out in Portugal within the ARIA initiative, we describe the broad knowledge base used for the development of recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of allergic rhinitis, and these recommendations are based on the GRADE methodology, real world evidence acquired by mobile technology (mHealth) and resulting from allergenic exposure chamber studies. What follows is a summary of integrated care pathways for allergen immunotherapy produced in 2019. Allergen immunotherapy is considered an example of precision medicine where the use of mHealth technologies will improve stratification for patient selection and response monitoring. These recommendations were considered as best practices of integrated patient-centred care supported by digital systems from Directorate General for Health and Food Safety of the European Union (DG Santé) and represent the ARIA Phase 4 Change Management strategy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.20344/amp.13777DOI Listing
February 2021

Revisiting the role of concept mapping in teaching and learning pathophysiology for medical students.

Adv Physiol Educ 2020 Sep;44(3):475-481

Pathophysiology Department, NOVA Medical School, Lisbon, Portugal.

Concept mapping methodology is a way of representing knowledge described as a useful tool in medical education. It was introduced in the pathophysiology curricular unit at NOVA Medical School in 2002, within an ongoing experience of problem-based learning. Our goal is to present a comparison between the students' opinions and performances in two academic years, 2017-18 and 2018-19, to evaluate the effects of pedagogical changes in the concept mapping methodology, applied in the last year, which is also described in detail. Our convenience samples were composed by 224 students in 2017-2018 and by 216 students in 2018-2019. The analysis used the students' responses to the yearly institutional questionnaire on the quality of teaching and to a specific questionnaire applied to evaluate the tutorial sessions of 2018-19. Both were anonymous, and the response rate was above 50%. A comparison was also made between the continuous assessment during the tutorial sessions, expressed as a final cumulative score, and the results of an obligatory multiple-choice final test. The students considered the introduced pedagogical changes useful in their different components, such as identification of core concepts, construction of mini-maps, and their inclusion in final global maps. The better performance of the tutors, signaled by the students in 2018-19, was probably due to the preparatory pedagogical sessions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1152/advan.00020.2020DOI Listing
September 2020

Mining for Peaks in LC-HRMS Datasets Using Finnee - A Case Study with Exhaled Breath Condensates from Healthy, Asthmatic, and COPD Patients.

ACS Omega 2020 Jul 23;5(26):16089-16098. Epub 2020 Jun 23.

UniMS - Mass Spectrometry Unit, iBET, Av República, EAN, 2780-157 Oeiras, Portugal.

Separation techniques hyphenated to high-resolution mass spectrometry are essential in untargeted metabolomic analyses. Due to the complexity and size of the resulting data, analysts rely on computer-assisted tools to mine for features that may represent a chromatographic signal. However, this step remains problematic, and a high number of false positives are often obtained. This work reports a novel approach where each step is carefully controlled to decrease the likelihood of errors. Datasets are first corrected for baseline drift and background noise before the MS scans are converted from profile to centroid. A new alignment strategy that includes purity control is introduced, and features are quantified using the original data with scans recorded as profile, not the extracted features. All the algorithms used in this work are part of the Finnee Matlab toolbox that is freely available. The approach was validated using metabolites in exhaled breath condensates to differentiate individuals diagnosed with asthma from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. With this new pipeline, twice as many markers were found with Finnee in comparison to XCMS-online, and nearly 50% more than with MS-Dial, two of the most popular freeware for untargeted metabolomics analysis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.0c01610DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7346274PMC
July 2020

ARIA digital anamorphosis: Digital transformation of health and care in airway diseases from research to practice.

Authors:
Jean Bousquet Josep M Anto Claus Bachert Tari Haahtela Torsten Zuberbier Wienczyslawa Czarlewski Anna Bedbrook Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich G Walter Canonica Victoria Cardona Elisio Costa Alvaro A Cruz Marina Erhola Wytske J Fokkens Joao A Fonseca Maddalena Illario Juan-Carlos Ivancevich Marek Jutel Ludger Klimek Piotr Kuna Violeta Kvedariene Ltt Le Désirée E Larenas-Linnemann Daniel Laune Olga M Lourenço Erik Melén Joaquim Mullol Marek Niedoszytko Mikaëla Odemyr Yoshitaka Okamoto Nikos G Papadopoulos Vincenzo Patella Oliver Pfaar Nhân Pham-Thi Christine Rolland Boleslaw Samolinski Aziz Sheikh Mikhail Sofiev Charlotte Suppli Ulrik Ana Todo-Bom Peter-Valentin Tomazic Sanna Toppila-Salmi Ioanna Tsiligianni Arunas Valiulis Erkka Valovirta Maria-Teresa Ventura Samantha Walker Sian Williams Arzu Yorgancioglu Ioana Agache Cezmi A Akdis Rute Almeida Ignacio J Ansotegui Isabella Annesi-Maesano Sylvie Arnavielhe Xavier Basagaña Eric D Bateman Annabelle Bédard Martin Bedolla-Barajas Sven Becker Kazi S Bennoor Samuel Benveniste Karl C Bergmann Michael Bewick Slawomir Bialek Nils E Billo Carsten Bindslev-Jensen Leif Bjermer Hubert Blain Matteo Bonini Philippe Bonniaud Isabelle Bosse Jacques Bouchard Louis-Philippe Boulet Rodolphe Bourret Koen Boussery Fluvio Braido Vitalis Briedis Andrew Briggs Christopher E Brightling Jan Brozek Guy Brusselle Luisa Brussino Roland Buhl Roland Buonaiuto Moises A Calderon Paulo Camargos Thierry Camuzat Luis Caraballo Ana-Maria Carriazo Warner Carr Christine Cartier Thomas Casale Lorenzo Cecchi Alfonso M Cepeda Sarabia Niels H Chavannes Ekaterine Chkhartishvili Derek K Chu Cemal Cingi Jaime Correia de Sousa David J Costa Anne-Lise Courbis Adnan Custovic Biljana Cvetkosvki Gennaro D'Amato Jane da Silva Carina Dantas Dejan Dokic Yves Dauvilliers Giulia De Feo Govert De Vries Philippe Devillier Stefania Di Capua Gerard Dray Ruta Dubakiene Stephen R Durham Mark Dykewicz Motohiro Ebisawa Mina Gaga Yehia El-Gamal Enrico Heffler Regina Emuzyte John Farrell Jean-Luc Fauquert Alessandro Fiocchi Antje Fink-Wagner Jean-François Fontaine José M Fuentes Perez Bilun Gemicioğlu Amiran Gamkrelidze Judith Garcia-Aymerich Philippe Gevaert René Maximiliano Gomez Sandra González Diaz Maia Gotua Nick A Guldemond Maria-Antonieta Guzmán Jawad Hajjam Yunuen R Huerta Villalobos Marc Humbert Guido Iaccarino Despo Ierodiakonou Tomohisa Iinuma Ewa Jassem Guy Joos Ki-Suck Jung Igor Kaidashev Omer Kalayci Przemyslaw Kardas Thomas Keil Musa Khaitov Nikolai Khaltaev Jorg Kleine-Tebbe Rostislav Kouznetsov Marek L Kowalski Vicky Kritikos Inger Kull Stefania La Grutta Lisa Leonardini Henrik Ljungberg Philip Lieberman Brian Lipworth Karin C Lodrup Carlsen Catarina Lopes-Pereira Claudia C Loureiro Renaud Louis Alpana Mair Bassam Mahboub Michaël Makris Joao Malva Patrick Manning Gailen D Marshall Mohamed R Masjedi Jorge F Maspero Pedro Carreiro-Martins Mika Makela Eve Mathieu-Dupas Marcus Maurer Esteban De Manuel Keenoy Elisabete Melo-Gomes Eli O Meltzer Enrica Menditto Jacques Mercier Yann Micheli Neven Miculinic Florin Mihaltan Branislava Milenkovic Dimitirios I Mitsias Giuliana Moda Maria-Dolores Mogica-Martinez Yousser Mohammad Steve Montefort Ricardo Monti Mario Morais-Almeida Ralph Mösges Lars Münter Antonella Muraro Ruth Murray Robert Naclerio Luigi Napoli Leyla Namazova-Baranova Hugo Neffen Kristoff Nekam Angelo Neou Björn Nordlund Ettore Novellino Dieudonné Nyembue Robyn O'Hehir Ken Ohta Kimi Okubo Gabrielle L Onorato Valentina Orlando Solange Ouedraogo Julia Palamarchuk Isabella Pali-Schöll Peter Panzner Hae-Sim Park Gianni Passalacqua Jean-Louis Pépin Ema Paulino Ruby Pawankar Jim Phillips Robert Picard Hilary Pinnock Davor Plavec Todor A Popov Fabienne Portejoie David Price Emmanuel P Prokopakis Fotis Psarros Benoit Pugin Francesca Puggioni Pablo Quinones-Delgado Filip Raciborski Rojin Rajabian-Söderlund Frederico S Regateiro Sietze Reitsma Daniela Rivero-Yeverino Graham Roberts Nicolas Roche Erendira Rodriguez-Zagal Christine Rolland Regina E Roller-Wirnsberger Nelson Rosario Antonino Romano Menachem Rottem Dermot Ryan Johanna Salimäki Mario M Sanchez-Borges Joaquin Sastre Glenis K Scadding Sophie Scheire Peter Schmid-Grendelmeier Holger J Schünemann Faradiba Sarquis Serpa Mohamed Shamji Juan-Carlos Sisul Mikhail Sofiev Dirceu Solé David Somekh Talant Sooronbaev Milan Sova François Spertini Otto Spranger Cristiana Stellato Rafael Stelmach Michel Thibaudon Teresa To Mondher Toumi Omar Usmani Antonio A Valero Rudolph Valenta Marylin Valentin-Rostan Marilyn Urrutia Pereira Rianne van der Kleij Michiel Van Eerd Olivier Vandenplas Tuula Vasankari Antonio Vaz Carneiro Giorgio Vezzani Frédéric Viart Giovanni Viegi Dana Wallace Martin Wagenmann De Yun Wang Susan Waserman Magnus Wickman Dennis M Williams Gary Wong Piotr Wroczynski Panayiotis K Yiallouros Osman M Yusuf Heather J Zar Stéphane Zeng Mario E Zernotti Luo Zhang Nan Shan Zhong Mihaela Zidarn

Allergy 2021 01 23;76(1):168-190. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

University Clinic of Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Golnik, Slovenia.

Digital anamorphosis is used to define a distorted image of health and care that may be viewed correctly using digital tools and strategies. MASK digital anamorphosis represents the process used by MASK to develop the digital transformation of health and care in rhinitis. It strengthens the ARIA change management strategy in the prevention and management of airway disease. The MASK strategy is based on validated digital tools. Using the MASK digital tool and the CARAT online enhanced clinical framework, solutions for practical steps of digital enhancement of care are proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/all.14422DOI Listing
January 2021

Next-generation Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines for allergic rhinitis based on Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) and real-world evidence.

Authors:
Jean Bousquet Holger J Schünemann Akdis Togias Claus Bachert Martina Erhola Peter W Hellings Ludger Klimek Oliver Pfaar Dana Wallace Ignacio Ansotegui Ioana Agache Anna Bedbrook Karl-Christian Bergmann Mike Bewick Philippe Bonniaud Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich Isabelle Bossé Jacques Bouchard Louis-Philippe Boulet Jan Brozek Guy Brusselle Moises A Calderon Walter G Canonica Luis Caraballo Vicky Cardona Thomas Casale Lorenzo Cecchi Derek K Chu Elisio M Costa Alvaro A Cruz Wienczyslawa Czarlewski Gennaro D'Amato Philippe Devillier Mark Dykewicz Motohiro Ebisawa Jean-Louis Fauquert Wytske J Fokkens Joao A Fonseca Jean-François Fontaine Bilun Gemicioglu Roy Gerth van Wijk Tari Haahtela Susanne Halken Despo Ierodiakonou Tomohisa Iinuma Juan-Carlos Ivancevich Marek Jutel Igor Kaidashev Musa Khaitov Omer Kalayci Jorg Kleine Tebbe Marek L Kowalski Piotr Kuna Violeta Kvedariene Stefania La Grutta Désirée Larenas-Linnemann Susanne Lau Daniel Laune Lan Le Philipp Lieberman Karin C Lodrup Carlsen Olga Lourenço Gert Marien Pedro Carreiro-Martins Erik Melén Enrica Menditto Hugo Neffen Gregoire Mercier Ralph Mosgues Joaquim Mullol Antonella Muraro Leyla Namazova Ettore Novellino Robyn O'Hehir Yoshitaka Okamoto Ken Ohta Hae Sim Park Petr Panzner Giovanni Passalacqua Nhan Pham-Thi David Price Graham Roberts Nicolas Roche Christine Rolland Nelson Rosario Dermot Ryan Boleslaw Samolinski Mario Sanchez-Borges Glenis K Scadding Mohamed H Shamji Aziz Sheikh Ana-Maria Todo Bom Sanna Toppila-Salmi Ioana Tsiligianni Marylin Valentin-Rostan Arunas Valiulis Erkka Valovirta Maria-Teresa Ventura Samantha Walker Susan Waserman Arzu Yorgancioglu Torsten Zuberbier

J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020 01 15;145(1):70-80.e3. Epub 2019 Oct 15.

Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Uniersität zu Berlin and Berlin Institute of Health, Comprehensive Allergy-Centre, Department of Dermatology and Allergy, member of GA(2)LEN, Berlin, Germany.

The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis aims to control the disease and depends on many factors. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) guidelines have considerably improved the treatment of allergic rhinitis. However, there is an increasing trend toward use of real-world evidence to inform clinical practice, especially because randomized controlled trials are often limited with regard to the applicability of results. The Contre les Maladies Chroniques pour un Vieillissement Actif (MACVIA) algorithm has proposed an allergic rhinitis treatment by a consensus group. This simple algorithm can be used to step up or step down allergic rhinitis treatment. Next-generation guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of allergic rhinitis were developed by using existing GRADE-based guidelines for the disease, real-world evidence provided by mobile technology, and additive studies (allergen chamber studies) to refine the MACVIA algorithm.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.06.049DOI Listing
January 2020

The impact of indoor air quality on respiratory health of older people living in nursing homes: spirometric and exhaled breath condensate assessments.

J Environ Sci Health A Tox Hazard Subst Environ Eng 2019 5;54(12):1153-1158. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Serviço de Imunoalergologia, Hospital de Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, EPE , Lisbon , Portugal.

In the Portuguese Geriatric Study of the Health Effects of Indoor Air Quality in Senior Nursing Homes, we aimed to evaluate the impact of indoor air contaminants on the respiratory symptoms and biomarkers in a sample of elderly living in nursing homes. A total of 269 elderly answered a health questionnaire, performed a spirometry and 150 out of these collected an exhaled breath condensate sample for pH and nitrites analysis. The study included the evaluation of indoor chemical and microbiological contaminants. The median age of the participants was 84 (78-87) years and 70.6% were women. The spirometric data indicated the presence of airway obstruction in 14.5% of the sample. Median concentrations of air pollutants did not exceed the existing standards, although increased peak values were observed. In the multivariable analysis, each increment of 100 µg/m of total volatile organic compounds was associated with the odds of respiratory infection in the previous three months ( =1.05; 95% CI: 1.00-1.09). PM concentrations were inversely associated with pH values ( = -0.04, 95%: -0.06 to -0.01, for each increment of 10 µg/m). Additionally, a direct and an inverse association were found between total bacteria and FEV/FVC and FVC, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10934529.2019.1637206DOI Listing
December 2019

The Portuguese Severe Asthma Registry: Development, Features, and Data Sharing Policies.

Biomed Res Int 2018 21;2018:1495039. Epub 2018 Nov 21.

Pulmonology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, EPE, Vila Real, Portugal.

The Portuguese Severe Asthma Registry ( RAG) was developed by an open collaborative network of asthma specialists. RAG collects data from adults and pediatric severe asthma patients that despite treatment optimization and adequate management of comorbidities require step 4/5 treatment according to GINA recommendations. In this paper, we describe the development and implementation of RAG, its features, and data sharing policies. The contents and structure of RAG were defined in a multistep consensus process. A pilot version was pretested and iteratively improved. The selection of data elements for RAG considered other severe asthma registries, aiming at characterizing the patient's clinical status whilst avoiding overloading the standard workflow of the clinical appointment. Features of RAG include automatic assessment of eligibility, easy data input, and exportable data in natural language that can be pasted directly in patients' electronic health record and security features to enable data sharing (among researchers and with other international databases) without compromising patients' confidentiality. RAG is a national web-based disease registry of severe asthma patients, available at . It allows prospective clinical data collection, promotes standardized care and collaborative clinical research, and may contribute to inform evidence-based healthcare policies for severe asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/1495039DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280304PMC
April 2019

Reference values for spirometry in elderly individuals: a cross-sectional study of different reference equations.

Multidiscip Respir Med 2018 9;13. Epub 2018 Jan 9.

Chronic Diseases Research Centre, CEDOC, NOVA Medical School/Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal.

Background: Spirometry is the single most important test for the evaluation of respiratory function. The results are interpreted by comparing measured data with predicted values previously obtained from a reference population. Reference equations for spirometry have been discussed previously. The aim of this study was to compare reference values based on National Health and Nutrition Assessment Survey (NHANES III), European Community of Steel and Coal (ECSC), and Global Lung Initiative (GLI) equations in an elderly sample population.

Methods: Subjects from the Geriatric Study on Health Effects of Air Quality in elder care centres who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled. Spirometry was performed according to international guidelines. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and FEV/FVC ratio were reported as percentages of the predicted value, and the lower limit of normality was calculated.

Results: Out of 260 elderly patients, 69.6% were women; the mean age was 83.0 ± 6.46 years with an age range of 65-95 years. The lowest %FVC and %FEV values were obtained using the GLI reference equations. However, when NHANES III equations were used, the FEV/FVC ratio was higher than ratios obtained from GLI and ECSC equations. The prevalence of airway obstruction was highest using ECSC equations, while GLI equations demonstrated more restrictive defects.

Conclusions: The present study showed meaningful differences in the reference values, and consequently, in the results obtained using NHANES III, ECSC, and GLI reference equations. The spirometry interpretation was also influenced by the reference equations used.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40248-017-0112-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5759804PMC
January 2018

The global alliance against chronic respiratory diseases Portugal: 10 years of experience.

J Thorac Dis 2017 Oct;9(10):4133-4135

Portuguese Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SPAIC), Lisboa, Portugal.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2017.10.48DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5723848PMC
October 2017

The Influence of Thermal Comfort on the Quality of Life of Nursing Home Residents.

J Toxicol Environ Health A 2017 23;80(13-15):729-739. Epub 2017 May 23.

a Environmental Health Department , National Health , Porto , Portugal.

Thermal comfort (TC) parameters were measured in 130 rooms from nursing homes (NH), following ISO 7730:2005 in order to evaluate the influence of winter season TC indices on quality of life (QoL) in older individuals. Mean radiant temperature (mrT), predicted mean vote (PMV) and predicted percent of dissatisfied people (PPD) indices, and the respective measurement uncertainties were calculated using Monte Carlo Method. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013, during the winter season TC sampling campaign. Winter PMV and PPD indices showed significant differences between seasons in median values for comfort. There were also significant differences between seasons for air temperature, air velocity, mrT, and relative humidity. The winter PMV index displayed a "slightly cool" [≤-1] to "cool" [≤-2] in thermal sensation scale [-3 to 3]. PPD index reflected this discomfort as evidenced by a high rate of predicted dissatisfied occupants (64%). The influence of winter season TC on older individual QoL results demonstrated that values of PMV above -0.7 had higher mean score of QoL (coefficient estimate: 11.13 units) compared with values of PMV below -0.7. These findings are of relevance to public health and may be useful for understanding NH indoor environment variables thus implementing preventive policies in terms of standards and guidelines for these susceptible populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15287394.2017.1286929DOI Listing
October 2017

Chronic respiratory diseases and quality of life in elderly nursing home residents.

Chron Respir Dis 2016 Aug 10;13(3):211-9. Epub 2016 Mar 10.

CEDOC, Respiratory Research Group, Nova Medical School, Campo dos Mártires da Pátria, Lisbon, Portugal Serviço de Imunoalergologia, Hospital de Dona Estefânia, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central, EPE, Rua Jacinta Marto, Lisbon, Portugal.

Few studies have assessed the quality of life (QOL) related to chronic respiratory diseases in the elderly. In the framework of the geriatric study on the health effects of air quality in elderly care centers (GERIA) study, a questionnaire was completed by elderly subjects from 53 selected nursing homes. It included various sections in order to assess respiratory complaints, QOL (World Health Organization QOL (WHOQOL)-BREF), and the cognitive and depression status. The outcome variables were the presence of a score lower than 50 (<50) in each of the WHOQOL-BREF domains (physical health, psychological health, social relationships, and environmental health). Chronic bronchitis, frequent cough, current wheezing, asthma, and allergic rhinitis were considered as potential risk factors. The surveyed sample was (n = 887) 79% female, with a mean age of 84 years (SD: 7 years). In the multivariable analysis, a score of <50 in the physical domain was associated with wheezing in the previous 12 months (odds ratio (OR): 2.03, confidence interval (CI): 1.25-3.31) and asthma (OR: 1.95, CI: 1.12-3.38). The psychological domain was related with a frequent cough (OR: 1.43, CI: 0.95-2.91). A score of <50 in the environmental domain was associated with chronic bronchitis (OR: 2.89, CI: 1.34-6.23) and emphysema (OR: 3.89, CI: 1.27-11.88). In view of these findings, the presence of respiratory diseases seems to be an important risk factor for a low QOL among elderly nursing home residents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1479972316636990DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5720184PMC
August 2016

Effect of indoor air quality of day care centers in children with different predisposition for asthma.

Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2016 05 26;27(3):299-306. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

CEDOC, Respiratory Research Group, Nova Medical School, Campo dos Mártires da Pátria, Lisbon, Portugal.

Background: Scarce information is available about the relationships between indoor air quality (IAQ) at day care centers (DCC), the estimated predisposition for asthma, and the actual wheezing susceptibility.

Methods: In the Phase II of ENVIRH study, 19 DCC were recruited after cluster analysis. Children were evaluated firstly using the ISAAC questionnaire and later by a follow-up questionnaire about recent wheezing. A positive asthma predictive index (API) was considered as predisposition for asthma. Every DCC was audited for IAQ and monitored for chemical and biologic contaminants.

Results: We included 1191 children, with a median age of 43 (P25 -P75 : 25-58) months. Considering the overall sample, in the first questionnaire, associations were found between CO2 concentration (increments of 200 ppm) and diagnosis of asthma (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.20). Each increment of 100 μg/m(3) of total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and 1 μg of Der p1/g of dust were associated with wheezing in the previous 12 months (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01-1.11 and OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99-1.12, respectively). In the follow-up questionnaire, TVOC were again associated with wheezing (OR: 1.05; 95% CI: 1.00-1.11). Children exposed to fungal concentration above the 75th percentile had also higher odds of wheezing at follow-up. TVOC were associated with wheezing in children with either negative or positive API.

Conclusions: IAQ in DCC seems to be associated with wheezing, in children with and without predisposition for asthma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pai.12521DOI Listing
May 2016

The impact of indoor air quality and contaminants on respiratory health of older people living in long-term care residences in Porto.

Age Ageing 2016 Jan 11;45(1):136-42. Epub 2015 Nov 11.

Environmental Health Department, National Institute of Health, Porto, Portugal Institute of Public Health (ISPUP), Porto University, Porto, Portugal.

Background: persons who are 65 years or older often spend an important part of their lives indoors thus adverse indoor climate might influence their health status.

Objective: to evaluate the influence of indoor air quality and contaminants on older people's respiratory health.

Design: cross-sectional study.

Setting: 21 long-term care residences (LTC) in the city of Porto, Portugal.

Subjects: older people living in LTC with ≥65 years old.

Methods: the Portuguese version of BOLD questionnaire was administered by an interviewer to older residents able to participate (n = 143). Indoor air contaminants (IAC) were measured twice, during winter and summer in 135 areas. Mixed effects logistic regression models were used to study the association between the health questionnaire results and the monitored IAC, adjusted for age, smoking habits, gender and number of years living in the LTC.

Results: cough (23%) and sputum (12%) were the major respiratory symptoms, and allergic rhinitis (22%) the main self-reported illness. Overall particulate matter up to 2.5 micrometres in size median concentration was above the reference levels both in winter and summer seasons. Peak values of particulate matter up to 10 micrometres in size (PM10), total volatile organic compounds, carbon dioxide, bacteria and fungi exceeded the reference levels. Older people exposed to PM10 above the reference levels demonstrated higher odds of allergic rhinitis (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.1-7.2).

Conclusion: high levels of PM10 were associated with 3-fold odds of allergic rhinitis. No association was found between indoor air chemical and biological contaminants and respiratory symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afv157DOI Listing
January 2016

Environmental and ventilation assessment in Child Day Care Centers in Porto: the ENVIRH Project.

J Toxicol Environ Health A 2014 ;77(14-16):931-43

a Environmental Health Department , Portuguese National Health Institute Doutor Ricardo Jorge , Porto , Portugal.

Children attending day care centers (CDCC) have been reported to be more prone to infectious diseases when compared with those cared for at home, and are exposed to conditions that may increase the risk of allergies and asthma. Several studies revealed that consequences of poor ventilation conditions include high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) and many other indoor pollutants commonly detected in schools. Nine child day care centers were selected randomly to participate in this study. Fifty-two classrooms were assessed for chemical, biological, physical, and allergen parameters in spring and winter seasons in these nine CDCC located in Porto, Portugal. Outdoor measurements were also conducted for comparison. Our results indicated that (i) particulate matter (PM10) median levels were above the national reference levels, both by classroom type and by season; (ii) TVOC kindergarten peak values may raise some concern; (iii) CO2 was present at high median and maximum levels during spring and winter assessment in both nurseries and kindergartens classrooms; (iv) total bacteria concentrations were 57- and 52-fold higher in the nursery and kindergarten than outdoors, respectively, for the spring season; (v) winter and spring median predicted mean vote (PMV) indices were between "neutral" (0) and "slightly cool" (≤ -1) in the thermal sensation scale for comfort situations (-2 to 2) for both types of classrooms; (vi) there were significant differences for both PMV and predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD) indices by season; and (vii) CO2, total bacteria, and gram-negative bacteria were associated with low airflow rates. These data will help to evaluate the effectiveness of current building operation practices in child day care centers regarding indoor air quality and respiratory health.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15287394.2014.911134DOI Listing
September 2014

Individual exposure to air pollutants in a Portuguese urban industrialized area.

J Toxicol Environ Health A 2014 ;77(14-16):888-99

a CESAM and Department of Environment and Planning , University of Aveiro , Aveiro , Portugal.

Industrial development from the second half of the 20th century coupled with population growth and concentration in urban areas has accentuated the concern for potential effects and impacts from air pollutant emissions on environmental and human health. This study examined the Estarreja region, an urban area that has one of the largest chemical complexes in Portugal, a complex that was recently under expansion. In the scope of the INSPIRAR project, individual daily exposure of a group of individuals to particulate matter of 10 μm aerodynamic diameter (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in two phases was determined using a microenvironmental approach. In this context, personal daily activity profiles of individuals were established for their normal routine by personal interviews. These profiles enabled determination of where each individual was at each moment of the day. Utilizing this information with hourly air quality maps simulated with URBAIR air quality model and indoor/outdoor relationships, it was possible to calculate personal daily exposure of each individual to air pollutants. Results from the analysis of daily activity profiles showed a high level of sedentariness of this population and long durations spent indoors. The studied individuals displayed high personal PM10 and NO2 exposure variability. Data demonstrated possible error when a single concentration measurement was assumed as a proxy of exposure. In general, no significant differences were found between the two population groups, indicating that workers of the chemical complex were not exposed to a greater extent to PM10 and NO2 than the general population working in the same area.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15287394.2014.910159DOI Listing
September 2014

Food allergy and anaphylaxis in infants and preschool-age children.

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2014 Jun 18;53(7):652-7. Epub 2014 Mar 18.

Hospital de Dona Estefânia, Lisbon, Portugal CEDOC, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 1169-056 Lisbon, Portugal.

Food allergy (FA) prevalence data in infants and preschool-age children are sparse, and proposed risk factors lack confirmation. In this study, 19 children's day care centers (DCC) from 2 main Portuguese cities were selected after stratification and cluster analysis. An ISAAC's (International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood) derived health questionnaire was applied to a sample of children attending DCCs. Outcomes were FA parental report and anaphylaxis. Logistic regression was used to explore potential risk factors for reported FA. From the 2228 distributed questionnaires, 1217 were included in the analysis (54.6%). Children's median age was 3.5 years, and 10.8% were described as ever having had FA. Current FA was reported in 5.7%. Three (0.2%) reports compatible with anaphylaxis were identified. Reported parental history of FA, personal history of atopic dermatitis, and preterm birth increased the odds for reported current FA. A high prevalence of parental-perceived FA in preschool-age children was identified. Risk factor identification may enhance better prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0009922814527502DOI Listing
June 2014

CO(2) concentration in day care centres is related to wheezing in attending children.

Eur J Pediatr 2014 Aug 4;173(8):1041-9. Epub 2014 Mar 4.

CEDOC, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas (FCM), Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Campo dos Mártires da Pátria, 130, 1169-056, Lisbon, Portugal,

Unlabelled: Poor ventilation at day care centres (DCCs) was already reported, although its effects on attending children are not clear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between wheezing in children and indoor CO2 (a ventilation surrogate marker) in DCC and to identify behaviours and building characteristics potentially related to CO2. In phase I, 45 DCCs from Lisbon and Oporto (Portugal) were selected through a proportional stratified random sampling. In phase II, 3 months later, 19 DCCs were further reassessed after cluster analysis for the greatest difference comparison. In both phases, children's respiratory health was assessed by ISAAC-derived questionnaires. Indoor CO2 concentrations and building characteristics of the DCC were evaluated in both phases, using complementary methods. Mixed effect models were used to analyze the data. In phase I, which included 3,186 children (mean age 3.1 ± 1.5 years), indoor CO2 concentration in the DCC rooms was associated with reported wheezing in the past 12 months (27.5 %) (adjusted odds ratio (OR) for each increase of 200 ppm 1.04, 95 % CI 1:01 to 1:07). In phase II, the association in the subsample of 1,196 children seen in 19 out of the initial 45 DCCs was not significant (adjusted OR 1.02, 95 % CI 0.96 to 1.08). Indoor CO2 concentration was inversely associated with the practices of opening windows and internal doors and with higher wind velocity. A positive trend was observed between CO2 and prevalence of reported asthma (4.7 %).

Conclusion: Improved ventilation is needed to achieve a healthier indoor environment in DCC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-014-2288-4DOI Listing
August 2014