Publications by authors named "Pauline Brice"

155 Publications

eBEACOPP or A-AVD in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: (re)thinking the toxicities in the PET-driven strategies era.

Lancet Haematol 2021 Sep;8(9):e620

Service d'hématologie et thérapie cellulaire, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, 33600 Bordeaux, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3026(21)00239-8DOI Listing
September 2021

Outcomes of older patients with follicular lymphoma using individual data from 5922 patients in 18 randomized controlled trials.

Blood Adv 2021 03;5(6):1737-1745

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Limited data exist to describe the clinical features and outcomes for elderly patients with follicular lymphoma (FL). The Follicular Lymphoma Analysis of Surrogacy Hypothesis (FLASH) group performed a prospectively planned pooled analysis of individual patient data from first-line randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and examined associations between age (≤70 vs >70 years), clinical characteristics, and FL outcomes. We identified 18 multicenter clinical RCTs in the FLASH database that enrolled elderly patients (>70 years). Primary end points were early disease outcomes, CR24 and CR30, and progression-free survival (PFS) at 24 months (PFS24). Secondary end points were PFS and overall survival (OS). We identified 5922 previously untreated FL patients from 18 RCTs. Patients age >70 years (vs ≤70 years) more commonly had elevated lactate dehydrogenase, hemoglobin <12 g/dL, ECOG PS ≥2, and elevated β2-microglobulin. Median follow-up was 5.6 years. Patients >70 years did not differ from patients ≤70 years in rates of CR24, CR30, or PFS24. With a median OS of 14.6 years for all patients, median OS was 7.4 and 15.7 years for patients >70 and ≤70 years of age, respectively (hazard ratio = 2.35; 95% confidence interval = 2.03-2.73; P < .001). Age >70 years was a significant predictor of OS and PFS due to higher rates of death without progression, but not PFS24, CR24, or CR30. FL patients >70 years treated on trials have similar early disease outcomes to younger patients. There is no disease-specific outcome difference between age groups. Age alone should not disqualify patients from standard treatments or RCTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2020002724DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7993094PMC
March 2021

Classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

Lancet 2021 Oct 22;398(10310):1518-1527. Epub 2021 Jan 22.

Wilmot Cancer Institute, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the more frequent lymphomas and is generally considered a highly curable disease with standard first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy in some cases. Despite these outstanding results, major problems remain unresolved. First, there are still patients who will not be cured with front-line regimens and, second, many patients who are cured of classical Hodgkin lymphoma continue to die prematurely due to the late toxic effects of their therapy. Because the median age of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma is in the mid-30s, the disease's impact on the number of years lost from productive life is remarkable. In recent years, the gold standard of chemotherapy (often combined with radiotherapy) has changed, with the approval of immunotherapy mostly in relapse settings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32207-8DOI Listing
October 2021

Tandem autologous-reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation in high-risk relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: a retrospective study of the Lymphoma Working Party-EBMT.

Bone Marrow Transplant 2021 03 12;56(3):655-663. Epub 2020 Oct 12.

Institut Català d'Oncologia (ICO)-Hospitalet, IDIBELL, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is curative for a proportion of patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, there is a small group of patients with high-risk of relapse after ASCT that might benefit from other approaches. We conducted a retrospective analysis on 126 patients treated with tandem ASCT-reduced intensity conditioning (RIC)-allogeneic-SCT and reported to the EBMT registry to analyze the efficacy and safety of this approach. Patients were included if they had received an ASCT followed by a planned RIC-SCT in <6 months without relapse between the procedures. The median time between diagnosis and ASCT was 16 months (2-174). The median number of lines prior to ASCT was two (33% of the patients received >3 lines). Forty-one percent were transplanted with active disease. The median follow-up was 44 months (6-130). Three-year-progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), incidence of relapse (IR), and non-relapse mortality (NRM) after the tandem were 53% (45-64), 73% (65-81), 34% (24-42), and 13% (8-21), respectively. This is the largest series analyzing the efficacy and safety of a tandem approach in R/R HL. The low NRM and IR with promising PFS and OS suggest that this might be an effective procedure for a high-risk population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41409-020-01075-yDOI Listing
March 2021

Long-term overall survival and toxicities of ABVD vs BEACOPP in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma: A pooled analysis of four randomized trials.

Cancer Med 2020 09 25;9(18):6565-6575. Epub 2020 Jul 25.

Department of Onco-Haematology, Archet Hospital, Nice, France.

Purpose: We explored the potential overall survival (OS) benefit of bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin), cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), procarbazine, and prednisone (BEACOPP) over doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) in a pooled analysis of four randomized trials.

Patients And Methods: Primary objective was to evaluate the OS impact of BEACOPP using individual patient data. Secondary objectives were progression-free survival (PFS), secondary cancers, and use of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).

Results: About 1227 patients were included. The 7-year OS was 84.3% (95% CI 80.8-87.2) for ABVD vs 87.7% (95% CI 84.5-90.2) for BEACOPP. Two follow-up periods were identified based on survival curves and hazard ratio (HR) over time. For the first 18 months, there was no difference. For the second period of ≥18 months, ABVD patients had a higher death risk (HR  = 1.59; 95% CI 1.09-2.33). A Cox model stratified by trial and evaluating the effect of treatment and International Prognostic Index (IPI) score as fixed effects showed that both were statistically significant (treatment, P = .0185; IPI score, P = .0107). The 7-year PFS was 71.1% (95% CI 67.1-74.6) for ABVD vs 81.1% (95% CI 77.5-84.2) for BEACOPP (P < .001). After ABVD, 25 secondary cancers (4.0%) were reported with no myelodysplasia (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared to 36 (6.5%) after BEACOPP, which included 13 patients with MDS/AML. Following ABVD, 86 patients (13.8%) received ASCT vs 39 (6.4%) for BEACOPP.

Conclusions: This analysis showed a slight improvement in OS for BEACOPP and confirmed a PFS benefit. Frontline use of BEACOPP instead of ABVD increased secondary leukemia incidence but halved the requirement for ASCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cam4.3298DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7520354PMC
September 2020

Lupus Erythematosus Tumidus Mimicking Primary Cutaneous Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma.

Acta Derm Venereol 2020 Aug 17;100(15):adv00229. Epub 2020 Aug 17.

Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, , New York, USA.

is missing (Short communication).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3575DOI Listing
August 2020

Improved time to treatment failure and survival in ibrutinib-treated malignancies with a pharmaceutical care program: an observational cohort study.

Ann Hematol 2020 Jul 1;99(7):1615-1625. Epub 2020 Jun 1.

Paris Diderot University, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Paris, France.

Ibrutinib treatment has been shown to increase survival in patients with B cell malignancies. Real-life data suggest a large part of discontinuations are due to toxicities, impairing ibrutinib efficacy. We aimed to assess the impact of a pharmaceutical care program on the efficacy and safety of ibrutinib. This single-center, cohort, observational study enrolled patients with B cell malignancies. Patients were either assigned to the program or to receive usual care, based on physician decision. The program was conducted by clinical pharmacists specializing in oncology and included patient education for management of toxicities, adherence monitoring, interventions to reduce drug-drug interactions, and follow-up of transition from hospital to community. Between February 2014 and May 2017, we enrolled 155 patients, including 42 (27%) who were allocated to the program group and 113 (73%) to the usual care group. The effect of the program was beneficial in terms of time to treatment failure (p = 0.0005). The 30-month progression-free and overall survivals were significantly superior in the program group (respectively p = 0.002 and p = 0.004). Grade 3 or higher adverse events occurred more frequently for patients in the usual care group (15%) than program group (8%). A pharmaceutical care program provides a personalized environment for outpatient monitoring and control of the key risks associated with oral anticancer agents. This study shows evidence that management of ibrutinib treatment by clinical pharmacists results in significant improvement in survival and better tolerance than usual care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-020-04045-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7316844PMC
July 2020

Combining brentuximab vedotin with dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine and cisplatin as salvage treatment in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma: the phase II HOVON/LLPC Transplant BRaVE study.

Haematologica 2021 04 1;106(4):1129-1137. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Dept of Hematology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, and LYMMCARE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Achieving a metabolic complete response (mCR) before high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplant (auto-PBSCT) predicts progression free survival (PFS) in relapsed/refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (R/R cHL). We added brentuximab vedotin (BV) to DHAP to improve the mCR rate. In a Phase I dose-escalation part in 12 patients, we showed that BV-DHAP is feasible. This Phase II study included 55 R/R cHL patients (23 primary refractory). Treatment consisted of three 21-day cycles of BV 1.8 mg/kg on day 1, and DHAP (dexamethasone 40mg days 1-4, cisplatin 100mg/m2; day 1 and cytarabine 2x2g/m2; day 2). Patients with a metabolic partial response (mPR) or mCR proceeded to HDC/auto-PBSCT. Based on independent central FDG-PET-CT review, 42 of 52 evaluable patients (81% [95% CI: 67-90]) achieved an mCR before HDC/auto-PBSCT, five had an mPR and five had progressive disease (three were not evaluable). After HDC/auto-PBSCT, four patients with an mPR converted to an mCR. The 2-year PFS was 74% [95% CI: 63-86], and the overall survival 95% [95% CI: 90-100]. Toxicity was manageable and mainly consisted of grade 3/4 hematological toxicity, fever, nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity (grade 1/2) and transiently elevated liver enzymes during BV-DHAP. Eighteen patients developed new onset peripheral neuropathy (maximum grade 1/2) and all recovered. In conclusion, BV-DHAP is a very effective salvage regimen in R/R cHL patients, but patients should be monitored closely for toxicity. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02280993.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2019.243238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8018114PMC
April 2021

Hepatitis B virus-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in non-endemic areas in Western Europe: Clinical characteristics and prognosis.

J Infect 2020 02 14;80(2):219-224. Epub 2019 Dec 14.

Hematology-Oncology Unit, Centre Hospitalier de Versailles, 177 rue de Versailles, 78150 Le Chesnay, France; Université Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Université de Paris-Saclay; INSERM U1018, Centre pour la Recherche en Epidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP), Equipe "Générations et Santé " Gustave Roussy, F-94805 Villejuif, France. Electronic address:

The association between B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) is well demonstrated by epidemiological studies. Most studies concerning this association have been conducted in endemic areas. Thus, little is known concerning the clinical characteristics of HBV-related lymphomas in non-endemic areas. Here, we report the characteristics and outcomes of 39 patients with active HBV infection and B-cell NHL collected retrospectively in France and Italy. We also compared their characteristics with those of HCV-positive patients with NHL. The gender ratio (M/F) was 3.3 and the median age at NHL diagnosis, 59 years. The pathological distribution was 24 (62%) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and 15 (38%) other lymphomas subtypes: marginal zone lymphoma (n = 6), follicular lymphoma (n = 3), mantle cell lymphoma (n = 2), Burkitt's lymphoma (n = 1), and not otherwise specified low-grade B-NHL (n = 3). Treatment included antiviral therapy for 35 patients (90%). Twenty-two (92%) DLBCL patients received an R-CHOP or R-CHOP-like regimen, leading to complete remission for 18 (75%).At one year, 21 DLBCL patients (88%) were alive, and 13 other B-cell lymphoma patients (87%) were alive. This European study underscores the predominance of DLBCL among patients with active HBV infection and their similar outcomes to non-HBV infected patients with DLBCL when treated with R-CHOP and antivirals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jinf.2019.12.005DOI Listing
February 2020

Presence of T cells directed against CD20-derived peptides in healthy individuals and lymphoma patients.

Cancer Immunol Immunother 2019 Oct 7;68(10):1561-1572. Epub 2019 Sep 7.

Sorbonne Université, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Université Paris Descartes, Université Paris Diderot, Inserm UMRS 1138, "Cancer, Immune Control and Escape" Laboratory, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, Paris, France.

Preclinical and clinical studies have suggested that cancer treatment with antitumor antibodies induces a specific adaptive T cell response. A central role in this process has been attributed to CD4 T cells, but the relevant T cell epitopes, mostly derived from non-mutated self-antigens, are largely unknown. In this study, we have characterized human CD20-derived epitopes restricted by HLA-DR1, HLA-DR3, HLA-DR4, and HLA-DR7, and investigated whether T cell responses directed against CD20-derived peptides can be elicited in human HLA-DR-transgenic mice and human samples. Based on in vitro binding assays to recombinant human MHC II molecules and on in vivo immunization assays in H-2 KO/HLA-A2-DR1 transgenic mice, we have identified 21 MHC II-restricted long peptides derived from intracellular, membrane, or extracellular domains of the human non-mutated CD20 protein that trigger in vitro IFN-γ production by PBMCs and splenocytes from healthy individuals and by PBMCs from follicular lymphoma patients. These CD20-derived MHC II-restricted peptides could serve as a therapeutic tool for improving and/or monitoring anti-CD20 T cell activity in patients treated with rituximab or other anti-CD20 antibodies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00262-019-02389-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805815PMC
October 2019

Pembrolizumab in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma: 2-year follow-up of KEYNOTE-087.

Blood 2019 10 13;134(14):1144-1153. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Department of Medicine, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL.

Programmed death-1 inhibitors are approved for patients with relapsed or refractory classic Hodgkin lymphoma (RRcHL). We present the 2-year follow-up of the phase 2 KEYNOTE-087 study of pembrolizumab in 210 patients, based on HL progression after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and subsequent brentuximab vedotin (BV; cohort 1); salvage chemotherapy and BV, with ineligibility for SCT owing to chemorefractory disease (cohort 2); and progression after SCT without BV (cohort 3). With a median follow-up of 27.6 months, the objective response rate (ORR) by blinded independent central review was 71.9% (95% CI, 65.3-77.9), the complete response rate (CRR) was 27.6%, and the partial response (PR) rate was 44.3%. Median duration of response was 16.5 months (range, 0.0+ to 27.0+ [+, no progressive disease at last assessment]) in all patients, 22.1 months in cohort 1, 11.1 months in cohort 2, and 24.4 months in cohort 3. Median progression-free survival was not reached in all patients with CR: 13.8 months (95% CI, 12.0-22.1) for patients with PR and 10.9 months (95% CI, 5.6-11.1) for patients with stable disease. Median overall survival was not reached in all patients or in any cohort. Treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) of any grade occurred in 153 (72.9%) patients; grades 3 and 4 occurred in 25 (12.0%) patients; none resulted in death. Results confirmed effective antitumor activity, durability of response, and manageable safety of pembrolizumab monotherapy in RRcHL, regardless of prior treatment and including chemoresistant cHL. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02453594.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2019000324DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6776792PMC
October 2019

Nivolumab Combined With Brentuximab Vedotin for Relapsed/Refractory Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Efficacy and Safety From the Phase II CheckMate 436 Study.

J Clin Oncol 2019 11 9;37(33):3081-3089. Epub 2019 Aug 9.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

Purpose: Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a rare but aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with poor outcomes in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) disease. PMBL is characterized by high expression of programmed death-1 ligand and variable expression of CD30. Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death-1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, and brentuximab vedotin (BV), an anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate, may have synergistic activity in R/R PMBL.

Methods: The expansion cohort of the open-label, phase I/II CheckMate 436 study enrolled patients with confirmed R/R PMBL who were previously treated with either autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation or two or more prior chemotherapy regimens if ineligible for autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. Patients received nivolumab (240 mg intravenously) and BV (1.8 mg/kg intravenously) every 3 weeks until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Primary end points were investigator-assessed objective response rate (ORR) per the Lugano 2014 criteria and safety.

Results: Thirty patients with PMBL were treated and evaluable. At a median follow-up of 11.1 months, ORR (95% CI) was 73% (54% to 88%), with a 37% complete remission rate per investigator, and ORR of 70% (51% to 85%), with a 43% complete metabolic response rate per independent review. Median duration of response, median progression-free survival, and median overall survival have not been reached. Eleven responders had consolidation with autologous (n = 5) or allogeneic (n = 6) transplantation. Treatment-related adverse events were reported in 25 patients (83%). Sixteen patients (53%) had grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse events; the most common were neutropenia (n = 9), thrombocytopenia (n = 3), and peripheral neuropathy (n = 3). There were no treatment-related deaths.

Conclusion: In patients with R/R PMBL, the combination of nivolumab plus BV represents a promising option, with high antitumor activity and a manageable safety profile.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.19.01492DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6864847PMC
November 2019

Sustained Progression-Free Survival Benefit of Rituximab Maintenance in Patients With Follicular Lymphoma: Long-Term Results of the PRIMA Study.

J Clin Oncol 2019 11 24;37(31):2815-2824. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

Centre Henri-Becquerel, Rouen, France.

Purpose: The PRIMA study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00140582) established that 2 years of rituximab maintenance after first-line immunochemotherapy significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with follicular lymphoma compared with observation. Here, we report the final PFS and overall survival (OS) results from the PRIMA study after 9 years of follow-up and provide a final overview of safety.

Methods: Patients (> 18 years of age) with previously untreated high-tumor-burden follicular lymphoma were nonrandomly assigned to receive one of three immunochemotherapy induction regimens. Responding patients were randomly assigned (stratified by induction regimen, response to induction treatment, treatment center, and geographic region) 1:1 to receive 2 years of rituximab maintenance (375 mg/m, once every 8 weeks), starting 8 weeks after the last induction treatment, or observation (no additional treatment). All patients in the extended follow-up provided their written informed consent (data cutoff: December 31, 2016).

Results: In total, 1,018 patients completed induction treatment and were randomly assigned to rituximab maintenance (n = 505) or observation (n = 513). Consent for the extended follow-up was provided by 607 patients (59.6%) of 1,018 (rituximab maintenance, n = 309; observation, n = 298). After data cutoff, median PFS was 10.5 years in the rituximab maintenance arm compared with 4.1 years in the observation arm (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.73; < .001). No OS difference was seen in patients randomly assigned to rituximab maintenance or observation (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.77 to 1.40; = .7948); 10-year OS estimates were approximately 80% in both study arms. No new safety signals were observed.

Conclusion: Rituximab maintenance after induction immunochemotherapy provides a significant long-term PFS, but not OS, benefit over observation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JCO.19.01073DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6823890PMC
November 2019

Long-term efficacy of anti-PD1 therapy in Hodgkin lymphoma with and without allogenic stem cell transplantation.

Eur J Cancer 2019 07 10;115:47-56. Epub 2019 May 10.

Department of Hematology, University Hospital of Rennes, Rennes, France; INSERM, U1236, Rennes, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Long-term efficacy of anti-PD1 therapy and the need for a consolidation with allogenic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remain unclear in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL).

Methods: We retrospectively analysed 78 patients with R/R HL treated with nivolumab in the French Early Access Program and compared their outcomes according to subsequent allo-HSCT.

Results: After a median follow-up of 34.3 months, the best overall response rate was 65.8%, including 38.2% complete responses (CRs). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 12.1 months. Patients reaching a CR upon nivolumab had a significantly longer PFS than those reaching a partial response (PR) (median = not reached vs 9.3 months, p < 0.001). In our cohort, 13 patients who responded (i.e. in CR or PR) to nivolumab monotherapy underwent consolidation with allo-HSCT. Among responding patients, none of those who underwent subsequent allo-HSCT (N = 13) relapsed, whereas 62.2% of those who were not consolidated with allo-HSCT (N = 37) relapsed (p < 0.001). There was no difference in overall survival (OS) between the two groups. Five of 6 patients who were not in CR at the time of transplantation (4 PRs and 1 progressive disease) converted into a CR after allo-HSCT.

Conclusion: Most patients with R/R HL treated with anti-PD1 monotherapy eventually progressed, notably those who did not achieve a CR. Patients undergoing consolidation with allo-HSCT after anti-PD1 therapy experienced prolonged disease-free survival compared with non-transplanted patients, but this difference did not translate into a benefit in OS. This information should be considered when evaluating the risk/benefit ratio of allo-HSCT after anti-PD1 therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejca.2019.04.006DOI Listing
July 2019

Romidepsin is an effective and well-tolerated therapy in CD3CD4 lymphocyte-variant hypereosinophilic syndrome: A case report.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 Nov - Dec;7(8):2885-2887.e1. Epub 2019 May 10.

Department of Clinical Immunology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2019.04.039DOI Listing
October 2020

Patient-reported outcomes in KEYNOTE-087, a phase 2 study of pembrolizumab in patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

Leuk Lymphoma 2019 11 23;60(11):2705-2711. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Hematology Department, AP-HP Hopital Saint-Louis, Paris, France.

In KEYNOTE-087, pembrolizumab had a 69% overall response rate and acceptable safety in patients with relapsed/refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (rrHL). We assessed health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in KEYNOTE-087. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (QLQ-C30) and the EuroQoL Five Dimensions Questionnaire 3-level version (EQ-5D) were administered to 206 patients across three cohorts defined by lymphoma progression after: (1) autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and subsequent brentuximab vedotin (BV) ( = 69); (2) salvage chemotherapy and BV ( = 79); and (3) ASCT without post-transplantation BV ( = 58). Compliance/completion rates were ≥90% at week 12 and ≥70% at week 24. QLQ-C30 global health status/QoL and EQ-5D visual analog scale scores showed mean increases from baseline in overall health at all assessed timepoints. With few exceptions, mean improvements from baseline to weeks 12 and 24 in QLQ-C30 functional and symptom scores occurred in all cohorts.Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02453594.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10428194.2019.1602262DOI Listing
November 2019

PET-adapted treatment for newly diagnosed advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (AHL2011): a randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority, phase 3 study.

Lancet Oncol 2019 02 15;20(2):202-215. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

LYSA Imaging, Hôpital H Mondor, Creteil, France.

Background: Increased-dose bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (BEACOPP) improves progression-free survival in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma compared with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), but is associated with increased risks of haematological toxicity, secondary myelodysplasia or leukaemia, and infertility. We investigated whether PET monitoring during treatment could allow dose de-escalation by switching regimen (BEACOPP to ABVD) in early responders without loss of disease control compared with standard treatment without PET monitoring.

Methods: AHL2011 is a randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 study done in 90 centres across Belgium and France. Eligible patients were aged 16-60 years and had newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma, excluding nodular lymphocyte predominant subtype, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score less than 3, a life expectancy of at least 3 months, an Ann Arbor disease stage III, IV, or IIB with mediastinum-to-thorax ratio of 0·33 or greater than or extranodal localisation, and had received no previous treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. Randomisation was unmasked and done centrally by the permuted block method. Patients were randomly assigned to standard treatment (BEACOPP given every 21 days for six cycles) or PET-driven treatment. All patients received two cycles of upfront BEACOPP, after which PET assessment was done (PET2). In the standard treatment group, PET2 patients completed two additional cycles of BEACOPP induction therapy irrespective of PET2 findings. In the PET-driven treatment group, patients with positive PET2 scans received the further two cycles of BEACOPP and those with a negative PET2 scan switched to two cycles of ABVD for the remaining induction therapy. In both treatment groups, PET at the end of induction therapy was used to decide whether to continue with consolidation therapy in those with negative scans or start salvage therapy in patients with positive scans (either two cycles of ABVD in PET2-negative patients in the PET-driven arm or two cycles of BEACOPP). BEACOPP consisted of bleomycin 10 mg/m and vincristine 1·4 mg/m intravenously on day 8, etoposide 200 mg/m intravenously on days 1-3, doxorubicin 35 mg/m and cyclophosphamide 1250 mg/m intravenously on day 1, 100 mg/m oral procarbazine on days 1-7, and 40 mg/m oral prednisone on days 1-14. ABVD was given every 28 days (doxorubicin 25 mg/m, bleomycin 10 mg/m, vinblastine 6 mg/m, and dacarbazine 375 mg/m intravenously on days 1 and 15). The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival. Non-inferiority analyses were done by intention to treat and per protocol. The study had a non-inferiority margin of 10%, to show non-inferiority of PET-guided treatment versus standard care with 80% power and an alpha of 2·5% (one-sided). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01358747.

Findings: From May 19, 2011, to April 29, 2014, 823 patients were enrolled-413 in the standard care group and 410 in the PET-driven group. 346 (84%) of 410 patients in the PET-driven treatment group were assigned to receive ABVD and 51 (12%) to continue receiving BEACOPP after PET2. With a median follow-up of 50·4 months (IQR 42·9-59·3), 5-year progression-free survival by intention to treat was 86·2%, 95% CI 81·6-89·8 in the standard treatment group versus 85·7%, 81·4-89·1 in the PET-driven treatment group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·084, 95% CI 0·737-1·596; p=0·65) and per protocol the values were 86·7%, 95% CI 81·9-90·3 and 85·4%, 80·7-89·0, respectively (HR 1·144, 0·758-1·726; p=0·74). The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were leucopenia (381 [92%] in the standard treatment group and 387 [95%] in the PET-driven treatment group), neutropenia (359 [87%] and 366 [90%]), anaemia (286 [69%] vs 114 [28%]), thrombocytopenia (271 [66%] and 163 [40%]), febrile neutropenia (145 [35%] and 93 [23%]), infections (88 [22%] and 47 [11%]), and gastrointestinal disorders (49 [11%] and 48 [11%]). Serious adverse events related to treatment were reported in 192 (47%) patients in the standard treatment group and 114 (28%) in the PET-driven treatment group, including infections (84 [20%] of 412 vs 50 [12%] of 407) and febrile neutropenia (21 [5%] vs 23 [6%]). Six (1%) patients in the standard care group died from treatment-related causes (two from septic shock, two from pneumopathy, one from heart failure, and one from acute myeloblastic leukaemia), as did two (<1%) in the PET-driven treatment group (one from septic shock and one from acute myeloblastic leukaemia).

Interpretation: PET after two cycles of induction BEACOPP chemotherapy safely guided treatment in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma and allowed the use of ABVD in early responders without impairing disease control and reduced toxicities. PET staging allowed accurate monitoring of treatment in this trial and could be considered as a strategy for the routine management of patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma.

Funding: Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1470-2045(18)30784-8DOI Listing
February 2019

L’arrivée de l’immunothérapie dans le lymphome de Hodgkin.

Bull Cancer 2018 Dec;105 Suppl 1:S50-S58

Service d'onco-hématologie - Hôpital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Paris, France.

Immunotherapy Of Hodgkin Lymphoma: Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare hematological cancer, affecting preferentially young adults. Using a risk-adapted approach, HL has become highly curable (>80%) with front-line chemotherapy in addition with radiotherapy, despite long term significant toxicity. Some patients are primary refractory or relapse after first-line chemotherapy, requiring high dose chemotherapy with serious side effects. Studies of the microenvironment from HL tissue reveal ineffective inflammatory and immune cell infiltrate surrounding Reed-Sternberg cells, involving the Programmed cell Death 1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand-1 checkpoint pathways. Recently, immune checkpoint inhibitors demonstrated high efficacy for relapsed and refractory patients, with a favorable safety profile but indeterminate long term outcome. Guidelines for nivolumab or pembrolizumab treatment in HL remain to be established.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0007-4551(18)30390-4DOI Listing
December 2018

Rituximab plus Lenalidomide in Advanced Untreated Follicular Lymphoma.

N Engl J Med 2018 09;379(10):934-947

From Université Lille, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU), Groupe de Recherche sur les formes Injectables et les Technologies Associées, Lille (F.M.), CHU Régional de Nancy, Service d'Hématologie, Vandoeuvre lès Nancy (P.F.), Institut Paoli-Calmettes (R.B.) and Department of Pathology, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de Marseille, INSERM, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Aix-Marseille Université (L.X.), Marseille, Centre Henri Becquerel, Unité 1245 and Département d'Hématologie, Université de Rouen, Rouen (H.T.), Institut d'Hématologie de Basse Normandie, Caen (C.F.), CHU Le Bocage Service d'Hématologie Clinique, Dijon (R.-O.C.), Hôpital Henri Mondor Unité Hémopathies Lymphoïdes, Créteil (C.H.), Centre Hospitalier Départemental Vendée Service d'Onco-Hématologie, La Roche sur Yon (H.M.), Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse Oncopole Service d'Hématologie, Toulouse (L.Y.), CHU Bordeaux, Service d'Hématologie, Bordeaux (K.B.), Hôpital Saint Louis Service d'Onco-Hématologie, Paris (P.B.), Gustave Roussy Cancer, Villejuif (V.R.), Centre Hospitalier Annecy Genevois Service, Annecy (N.D.), CHU de Nantes-Hôtel Dieu Service d'Hématologie Clinique, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie et Immunologie, INSERM, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université de Nantes, Nantes (S.L.G.), Centre Hospitalier Métropole Savoie Service Hématologie, Chambery (G.M.P.), Department of Hematology, CHU Montpellier, University of Montpellier, Montpellier (G.C.), and Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, University of Lyon, Pierre-Benite (G.A.S.) - all in France; the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (N.H.F.); the Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (M.L.P.); the Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle (E.N.L.); Sarah Cannon Research Institute-Tennessee Oncology, Nashville (I.W.F.); Washington University School of Medicine, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis (N.L.B.); the Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca and Instituto de Investigación Biomédica de Salamanca, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Cáncer, Salamanca (A.M.G.-S.), and the Department of Hematology, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona (A.L.-G.) - both in Spain; CHU de Québec, Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus, Quebec (J.-F.L.), and British Columbia Cancer Centre for Lymphoid Cancer, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (L.H.S.) - both in Canada; the Department of Hematology and Oncology, Tokai University Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan (K.A.); Instituto Português de Oncologia Lisboa Francisco Gentil Departamento de Hematologia, Lisbon (M.G.S.); the Department of Hematology, CHU Université Catholique de Louvain Namur, Yvoir (M.A.), and the Department of Hematology, Ziekenhuis Netwerk Antwerpen Stuivenberg, Antwerp (P.Z.) - both in Belgium; the Department of Hematology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (K.T.); and Celgene, Summit, NJ (D.L., J.W.).

Background: Rituximab plus chemotherapy has been shown to be effective in patients with advanced-stage, previously untreated follicular lymphoma; nevertheless, most patients will have a relapse. Combination immunotherapy with lenalidomide and rituximab is an immunomodulatory regimen that has shown promising activity in patients with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Methods: We conducted this multicenter, international, phase 3 superiority trial to evaluate rituximab plus lenalidomide, as compared with rituximab plus chemotherapy, in patients with previously untreated follicular lymphoma. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of the two regimens, followed by maintenance monotherapy with rituximab. Treatment with rituximab plus lenalidomide consisted of 18 cycles of the two drugs, followed by rituximab maintenance therapy every 8 weeks for 12 cycles (six additional doses). Treatment with rituximab plus chemotherapy consisted of the investigator's choice of one of three rituximab-based regimens, followed by maintenance monotherapy with rituximab every 8 weeks for 12 cycles. The primary end points were complete response (confirmed or unconfirmed) at 120 weeks and progression-free survival.

Results: A total of 1030 patients were randomly assigned to receive rituximab plus lenalidomide (513 patients) or rituximab plus chemotherapy (517 patients). The rate of confirmed or unconfirmed complete response at 120 weeks was similar in the two groups: 48% (95% confidence interval [CI], 44 to 53) in the rituximab-lenalidomide group and 53% (95% CI, 49 to 57) in the rituximab-chemotherapy group (P=0.13). The interim 3-year rate of progression-free survival was 77% (95% CI, 72 to 80) and 78% (95% CI, 74 to 82), respectively. A higher percentage of patients in the rituximab-chemotherapy group had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (32% vs. 50%) and febrile neutropenia of any grade (2% vs. 7%), and a higher percentage of patients in the rituximab-lenalidomide group had grade 3 or 4 cutaneous reactions (7% vs. 1%).

Conclusions: Among patients with previously untreated follicular lymphoma, efficacy results were similar with rituximab plus lenalidomide and rituximab plus chemotherapy (with both regimens followed by rituximab maintenance therapy). The safety profile differed in the two groups. (Funded by Celgene; RELEVANCE ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01476787 and NCT01650701 , and EudraCT number, 2011-002792-42 .).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa1805104DOI Listing
September 2018

Bendamustine and rituximab in elderly patients with low-tumour burden follicular lymphoma. Results of the LYSA phase II BRIEF study.

Br J Haematol 2018 10 16;183(1):76-86. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Lysa, University Hospital, Lyon, France.

The treatment of low-tumour burden follicular lymphoma (LTBFL) remains a challenge. Rituximab-based strategies may be improved by adding chemotherapy. This Lymphoma Study Association multicentre phase II study assessed rituximab and bendamustine in 63 patients with untreated LTBFL who were aged over 60 years old and had a follicular lymphoma International Prognostic Index (FLIPI) score ≥2. Induction comprised 4 weekly cycles of rituximab 375 mg/m intravenously combined with 2 cycles of bendamustine 90 mg/m days 1-2 with a 28-day interval, followed by twelve cycles of 375 mg/m rituximab maintenance therapy every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was complete response (CR)/unconfirmed CR (CRu), at 12 weeks. Median age was 67·4 years and median FLIPI was 3. Ultimately, 18 patients (29%) had high tumour burden according to Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes Folliculaires criteria. The 12-week CR/CRu rate was 54·0% and the overall response rate was 93·7%. Surprisingly, 3 patients died during maintenance (2 sepsis, 1 neoplasm). Progression-free survival was 85·4% at 24 months. In LTBFL patients with FLIPI ≥2, two cycles of rituximab and bendamustine result in a CR rate of 54·0%. However, the treatment-related deaths observed do not allow this regimen to be recommended for LTBFL patients aged over 60 years. EudraCT: 2010-020757-14; ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01313611.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjh.15513DOI Listing
October 2018

Efficacy of chemotherapy or chemo-anti-PD-1 combination after failed anti-PD-1 therapy for relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma: A series from Lysa centers.

Am J Hematol 2018 Jun 8. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Hematology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France.

Anti-PD-1 therapy provides high response rates in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients who have relapsed or are refractory (R/R) to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and brentuximab vedotin (BV), but median progression free survival (PFS) is only one year. The efficacy of treatment following anti-PD-1 is not well known. We retrospectively investigated the efficacy of salvage therapies for unsatisfactory response to anti-PD-1 therapy, assessed by PET-CT according to the Lugano criteria, in 30 R/R HL patients. Patients were highly pre-treated before anti-PD-1 (70% received ASCT and 93% BV). Unsatisfactory responses to anti-PD1 therapy were progressive disease (PD) (n=24) and partial response (PR) (n=6). For the 24 PD patients, median anti-PD-1 related PFS was 7.5 months (95%CI, 5.7-11.6); 17 received subsequent CT alone (Group 1) and 7 received CT in addition to anti-PD-1 (Group 2). 16/24 patients (67%) obtained an objective response. In the 15 patients treated with the same CT, twelve obtained PR or complete response (CR). In Group 1, there were 7 CR (41%), 3 PR (18%), and 7 PD (41%). In Group 2, there were 4 CR (57%), 2 PR (29%), and 1 SD (14%). No unexpected toxicity was observed. Six patients who achieved response proceeded to allogeneic SCT. With a median follow-up of 12.1 months (7-14.7), the median PFS following the initiation of CT was 11 months (95%CI, 6.3; not reached) and the median of overall survival was not reached. These observations in highly pre-treated HL patients suggest that anti-PD-1 therapy might re-sensitize tumor cells to CT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajh.25154DOI Listing
June 2018

Prolonged remissions after anti-PD-1 discontinuation in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

Blood 2018 06 3;131(25):2856-2859. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Hematology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, Rennes, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood-2018-03-841262DOI Listing
June 2018
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