Publications by authors named "Paul Habert"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Thoracic involvement and imaging patterns in IgG4-related disease.

Eur Respir Rev 2021 Dec 5;30(162). Epub 2021 Oct 5.

Dept of Internal Medicine, Aix Marseille University, APHM, CHU La Timone, Marseille, France

Objective: Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a rare orphan disease. Lung, pleura, pericardium, mediastinum, aorta and lymph node involvement has been reported with variable frequency and mostly in Asian studies. The objective of this study was to describe thoracic involvement assessed by high-resolution thoracic computed tomography (CT) in Caucasian patients with IgG4-RD.

Methods: Thoracic CT scans before treatment were retrospectively collected through the French case registry of IgG4-RD and a single tertiary referral centre. CT scans were reviewed by two experts in thoracic imagery blinded from clinical data.

Results: 48 IgG4-RD patients with thoracic involvement were analysed. All had American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism classification scores ≥20 and comprehensive diagnostic criteria for IgG4-RD. CT scan findings showed heterogeneous lesions. Seven patterns were observed: peribronchovascular involvement (56%), lymph node enlargement (31%), nodular disease (25%), interstitial disease (25%), ground-glass opacities (10%), pleural disease (8%) and retromediastinal fibrosis (4%). In 37% of cases two or more patterns were associated. Asthma was significantly associated with peribronchovascular involvement (p=0.04). Among eight patients evaluated by CT scan before and after treatments, only two patients with interstitial disease displayed no improvement.

Conclusion: Thoracic involvement of IgG4-RD is heterogeneous and likely underestimated. The main thoracic CT scan patterns are peribronchovascular thickening and thoracic lymph nodes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1183/16000617.0078-2021DOI Listing
December 2021

Early combination therapy with hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin reduces mortality in 10,429 COVID-19 outpatients.

Rev Cardiovasc Med 2021 09;22(3):1063-1072

Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire La Timone, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix Marseille Univ, C2VN, 13005 Marseille, France.

We evaluated the age-specific mortality of unselected adult outpatients infected with SARS-CoV-2 treated early in a dedicated COVID-19 day hospital and we assessed whether the use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) + azithromycin (AZ) was associated with improved survival in this cohort. A retrospective monocentric cohort study was conducted in the day hospital of our center from March to December 2020 in adults with PCR-proven infection who were treated as outpatients with a standardized protocol. The primary endpoint was 6-week mortality, and secondary endpoints were transfer to the intensive care unit and hospitalization rate. Among 10,429 patients (median age, 45 [IQR 32-57] years; 5597 [53.7%] women), 16 died (0.15%). The infection fatality rate was 0.06% among the 8315 patients treated with HCQ+AZ. No deaths occurred among the 8414 patients younger than 60 years. Older age and male sex were associated with a higher risk of death, ICU transfer, and hospitalization. Treatment with HCQ+AZ (0.17 [0.06-0.48]) was associated with a lower risk of death, independently of age, sex and epidemic period. Meta-analysis evidenced consistency with 4 previous outpatient studies (32,124 patients-Odds ratio 0.31 [0.20-0.47], I = 0%). Early ambulatory treatment of COVID-19 with HCQ+AZ as a standard of care is associated with very low mortality, and HCQ+AZ improve COVID-19 survival compared to other regimens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.31083/j.rcm2203116DOI Listing
September 2021

Percutaneous lung and liver CT-guided ablation on swine model using microwave ablation to determine ablation size for clinical practice.

Int J Hyperthermia 2021 ;38(1):1140-1148

Department of Interventional Imaging, Assistance Publique Hopitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France.

Purpose: Microwave ablation (MWA) provides an effective treatment of lung and liver tumors but suffers from a lack of reproducibility of ablation size among currently available technologies. evaluations are far removed from clinical practices because of uninfused tissue. This study is preclinical testing of a new MWA system on swine lungs and liver.

Materials And Methods: All ablations were performed under CT guidance and multiple algorithms were tested with a power of 50, 75, and 100 W for durations of 3, 5, 8, 10, and 15 min. A 3 D-evaluation of the ablation zone was carried out using enhanced-CT. The sphericity index, coefficients of variation, and energy efficiency (which corresponds to the volume yield according to the power supplied) were calculated.

Results: Fifty liver and 48 lung ablations were performed in 17 swine. The sphericity index varies from 0.50 to 0.80 for liver ablations and from 0.40 to 0.69 for lung ablations. The coefficient of variation was below 15% for 4/5 and 4/8 protocols for lung and liver ablations, respectively. The energy efficiency seems to decrease with the duration of the ablation from 0.60 × 10 cm/J (75 W, 3 min) to 0.26 × 10 cm/J (100 W, 15 min) in the liver and from 0.57 × 10 cm/J (50 W, 10 min) to 0.42 × 10 cm/J (100 W, 12 min) in the lungs.

Conclusion: A shorter treatment time provides the best energy efficiency, and the best reproducibility is obtained for a 10 min treatment duration. The system tested provides an interesting reproducibility in both lung and liver measurements. Our results may help interventional radiologists in the optimal selection of treatment parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02656736.2021.1961883DOI Listing
August 2021

Low Dose Chest CT and Lung Ultrasound for the Diagnosis and Management of COVID-19.

J Clin Med 2021 May 19;10(10). Epub 2021 May 19.

IRD, APHM, SSA, VITROME, Aix Marseille University, 13005 Marseille, France.

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has provided an opportunity to use low- and non-radiating chest imaging techniques on a large scale in the context of an infectious disease, which has never been done before. Previously, low-dose techniques were rarely used for infectious diseases, despite the recognised danger of ionising radiation.

Method: To evaluate the role of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) and lung ultrasound (LUS) in managing COVID-19 pneumonia, we performed a review of the literature including our cases.

Results: Chest LDCT is now performed routinely when diagnosing and assessing the severity of COVID-19, allowing patients to be rapidly triaged. The extent of lung involvement assessed by LDCT is accurate in terms of predicting poor clinical outcomes in COVID-19-infected patients. Infectious disease specialists are less familiar with LUS, but this technique is also of great interest for a rapid diagnosis of patients with COVID-19 and is effective at assessing patient prognosis.

Conclusions: COVID-19 is currently accelerating the transition to low-dose and "no-dose" imaging techniques to explore infectious pneumonia and their long-term consequences.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102196DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8160936PMC
May 2021

Description of morphological evolution of lung tumors treated by percutaneous radiofrequency ablation: long term follow-up of 100 lesions with chest CT.

Int J Hyperthermia 2021 ;38(1):786-794

Department of Medical Imaging, La Timone Hôpital, Marseille, France.

Purpose: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for pulmonary tumors. Patterns on chest computed tomography (CT) after RFA are classified into five types; however, the follow-up has not been fully described. The objectives of this study were to describe (1) the CT pattern 3 years after RFA and (2) its evolution over 7 years.

Materials And Methods: Lesions treated with RFA between 2009 and 2017 and with ≥3 years of follow-up CT data were included. Lesions with local recurrences were excluded from the study. The morphology of the ablation zone was classified as nodular, fibrotic, atelectatic, cavitary, and disappeared. Other initial anatomical parameters were recorded. Kruskal-Wallis or Chi-square tests were used to compare the groups.

Results: One hundred lung RFA scars were included, and a retrospective longitudinal study was performed. Three years after RFA, nodular, fibrotic, atelectatic, and cavitary scars, and disappearance were observed in 49%, 36%, 5%, 3%, and 6% of the scars, respectively. Evolution over 7 years showed that the fibrosis, atelectasis, and disappearance remained stable over time, whereas 28% of nodular scars evolved into fibrotic scars. Additionally, 45% of cavitary scars evolved into nodular scars. Pleural contact was associated with disappearance, and the use of a 20-mm needle was associated with atelectasis.

Conclusion: Follow-up after RFA showed that fibrosis, disappearance, and atelectasis remained stable over time. Nodular scars could evolve into fibrotic scars, and cavitary scars could evolve into nodular scars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02656736.2021.1928773DOI Listing
July 2021

Successful Lung Cryoablation for a Bulky Lung Carcinoma.

J Vasc Interv Radiol 2021 04;32(4):610

Department of Radiology, La Timone Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix Marseille Univ, LIIE, and Aix Marseille Univ, CERIMED, Marseille, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jvir.2020.10.025DOI Listing
April 2021

Prevalence and risk factors for lung involvement on low-dose chest CT (LDCT) in a paucisymptomatic population of 247 patients affected by COVID-19.

Insights Imaging 2020 Nov 17;11(1):117. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Radiology Department, La Timone Hospital, Assistance Publique Des Hôpitaux de Marseille, 264 Rue Saint Pierre, 13005, Marseille 05, France.

Background: Low-dose chest CT (LDCT) showed high sensitivity and ability to quantify lung involvement of COVID-19 pneumopathy. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors for lung involvement in 247 patients with a visual score and assess the prevalence of incidental findings.

Methods: For 12 days in March 2020, 250 patients with RT-PCR positive tests and who underwent LDCT were prospectively included. Clinical and imaging findings were recorded. The extent of lung involvement was quantified using a score ranging from 0 to 40. A logistic regression model was used to explore factors associated with a score ≥ 10.

Results: A total of 247 patients were analyzed; 138 (54%) showed lung involvement. The mean score was 4.5 ± 6.5, and the mean score for patients with lung involvement was 8.1 ± 6.8 [1-31]. The mean age was 43 ± 15 years, with 121 males (48%) and 17 asymptomatic patients (7%). Multivariate analysis showed that age > 54 years (odds ratio 4.4[2.0-9.6] p < 0.001) and diabetes (4.7[1.0-22.1] p = 0.049) were risk factors for a score ≥ 10. Multivariate analysis including symptoms showed that only age > 54 years (4.1[1.7-10.0] p = 0.002) was a risk factor for a score ≥ 10. Rhinitis (0.3[0.1-0.7] p = 0.005) and anosmia (0.3[0.1-0.9] p = 0.043) were protective against lung involvement. Incidental imaging findings were found in 19% of patients, with a need for follow-up in 0.6%.

Conclusion: The prevalence of lung involvement was 54% in a predominantly paucisymptomatic population. Age ≥ 55 years and diabetes were risk factors for significant parenchymal lung involvement. Rhinitis and anosmia were protective against LDCT abnormalities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13244-020-00939-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7670109PMC
November 2020

Combination of Alcohol and EVOH as a New Embolic Agent: Midterm Tissue and Inflammatory Effects in a Swine Model.

Radiol Res Pract 2020 23;2020:8831060. Epub 2020 Oct 23.

Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Section, Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Timone APHM, 278 Rue Saint-Pierre, Marseille 13005, France.

Objective: To evaluate the vascular occlusion and midterm tissue toxicity properties of a combination of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) (Squid 18®) (75%) and alcohol (25%)-Alco-Squid 18-in a swine model.

Materials And Methods: Alco-Squid 18 (75% Squid 18® mixed with 25% alcohol) (AS18) was compared to embolization with 96% alcohol alone and to embolization with Squid 18® (S18®) alone. An arteriovenous malformation (AVM) model was created in group 1 ( = 2). Each AVM model was then embolized with AS18 or S18® alone with evaluation of a ratio between the volume of embolic agent divided by the volume of the AVM (evaluated by CT). For group 2 ( = 5), each agent was tested on three different kidneys (upper pole kidney artery). Pre- and postinterventional CTs, angiographies, blood alcohol content dosages, and histological studies (3 months postintervention) were performed.

Results: AS18 has better distal distribution than S18® alone, both in the kidneys (mean capsule-S18® distance: 3.9 mm (±0.23) and mean capsule-AS18 distance: 2.3 mm (±0.11) (=0.029) and in the AVM model. Histological exploration found a higher rate of tubular necrosis with AS18 compared with S18® alone and alcohol alone (3.78 ± 0.44 compared to 2.33 ± 1.22 ( = 0.012) and 1.22 ± 0.67 (  < 0 .0001)). The blood alcohol content was negligible in all cases.

Conclusion: AS18 can suggest a better distal sclerotic and embolic character as compared with S18® alone without systemic toxicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2020/8831060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7605951PMC
October 2020

Low-dose chest CT for diagnosing and assessing the extent of lung involvement of SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia using a semi quantitative score.

PLoS One 2020 3;15(11):e0241407. Epub 2020 Nov 3.

Department of Radiology, La Timone Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France.

Objectives: The purpose is to assess the ability of low-dose CT (LDCT) to determine lung involvement in SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia and to describe a COVID19-LDCT severity score.

Materials And Methods: Patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by RT-PCR were retrospectively analysed. Clinical data, the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) and imaging features were recorded. Lung features included ground-glass opacities (GGO), areas of consolidation and crazy paving patterns. The COVID19-LDCT score was calculated by summing the score of each segment from 0 (no involvement) to 10 (severe impairment). Univariate analysis was performed to explore predictive factor of high COVID19-LDCT score. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney test was used to compare groups and a Spearman correlation used with p<0.05 for significance.

Results: Eighty patients with positive RT-PCR were analysed. The mean age was 55 years ± 16, with 42 males (53%). The most frequent symptoms were fever (60/80, 75%) and cough (59/80, 74%), the mean NEWS was 1.7±2.3. All LDCT could be analysed and 23/80 (28%) were normal. The major imaging finding was GGOs in 56 cases (67%). The COVID19-LDCT score (mean value = 19±29) was correlated with NEWS (r = 0.48, p<0.0001). No symptoms were risk factor to have pulmonary involvement. Univariate analysis shown that dyspnea, high respiratory rate, hypertension and diabetes are associated to a COVID19-LDCT score superior to 50.

Conclusions: COVID19-LDCT score did correlate with NEWS. It was significantly different in the clinical low-risk and high-risk groups. Further work is needed to validate the COVID19-LDCT score against patient prognosis.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0241407PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7608883PMC
November 2020

FairEmbo Concept for Arterial Embolizations: In Vivo Feasibility and Safety Study with Suture-Based Microparticles Compared with Microspheres.

Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 2021 Apr 25;44(4):625-632. Epub 2020 Oct 25.

Interventional Radiololy Section, Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Timone, APHM, Marseille, France.

Purpose: Microspheres are effective embolic agents, especially for the management of bleeding and oncologic lesions. The first FairEmbo study reported the effectiveness of embolization using suture fragments. The effectiveness and safety of arterial embolization with suture-based microparticles (SBM) were assessed in a swine model.

Materials And Methods: In this ethical-approved animal study, a polar artery in each kidney was embolized in four swine: one side with hand-cut non-absorbable SBM (Flexocrin 2®) and the contralateral side with Embozene® 900 for comparison. Swine were followed for 3 months (M3) to evaluate the effectiveness and the safety of SBM. Follow-up protocol included clinical monitoring, computed tomography (CT) control and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), followed by histological analyses. The SBM confection parameters were evaluated by automatic microscopic sizer. RStudio software and Mann-Whitney test (significance at P < 0.05) were used for statistics.

Results: The average size of SBM was 1002 μm (SD = 258). All targets were effectively embolized by SBM with an angiogram defect estimated at 45.6% (95% CI [35.9-55.2]), compared to 40.5% (95% CI [30.6-55.5]) for Embozene® group (P = 0.342). The average duration of SBM embolization procedure was significantly increased compared to Embozene® embolization (1202 s versus 222 s, P = 0.029). There were no statistical differences in M3 DSA and CT for SBM and Embozene®, with persistence of partial arterial occlusion and atrophic embolized area. No postoperative complications were observed on clinical and CT controls.

Conclusion: This experimental study suggests that embolization with SBM is feasible, safe and effective in short- and medium-term follow-up as compared to microspheres.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00270-020-02678-0DOI Listing
April 2021

Follow-up after radiological intervention in oncology: ECIO-ESOI evidence and consensus-based recommendations for clinical practice.

Insights Imaging 2020 Jul 16;11(1):83. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Dept of Radiology, University Clinic of Navarra, Calle Benjamín de Tudela, 2, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.

Interventional radiology plays an important and increasing role in cancer treatment. Follow-up is important to be able to assess treatment success and detect locoregional and distant recurrence and recommendations for follow-up are needed. At ECIO 2018, a joint ECIO-ESOI session was organized to establish follow-up recommendations for oncologic intervention in liver, renal, and lung cancer. Treatments included thermal ablation, TACE, and TARE. In total five topics were evaluated: ablation in colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), TARE in CRLM, TACE and TARE in HCC, ablation in renal cancer, and ablation in lung cancer. Evaluated modalities were FDG-PET-CT, CT, MRI, and (contrast-enhanced) ultrasound. Prior to the session, five experts were selected and performed a systematic review and presented statements, which were voted on in a telephone conference prior to the meeting by all panelists. These statements were presented and discussed at the ECIO-ESOI session at ECIO 2018. This paper presents the recommendations that followed from these initiatives. Based on expert opinions and the available evidence, follow-up schedules were proposed for liver cancer, renal cancer, and lung cancer. FDG-PET-CT, CT, and MRI are the recommended modalities, but one should beware of false-positive signs of residual tumor or recurrence due to inflammation early after the intervention. There is a need for prospective preferably multicenter studies to validate new techniques and new response criteria. This paper presents recommendations that can be used in clinical practice to perform the follow-up of patients with liver, lung, and renal cancer who were treated with interventional locoregional therapies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13244-020-00884-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7366866PMC
July 2020

[Central venous access in interventional radiology].

Presse Med 2019 Oct 25;48(10):1141-1145. Epub 2019 Oct 25.

AP-HM, hôpital La Timone, service de radiologie interventionnelle, 265, rue Saint-Pierre, 13005 Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille université, LIIE, Marseille, France; Aix-Marseille université, CERIMED, Marseille, France.

Some patients require iteratives intravenous administrations on a central catheter, for example in oncology or infectiology, which represents a challenge for ambulatory treatment. Interventional radiology could provide solutions with the implant and monitoring of PICC-lines and ports. These are implanted in sterile environment and under imaging guidance in an interventional radiology room by an operator and with a paramedical team that need to be experienced. This development focus on the interest of one method with respect to the other, as well as the differents ways to do, the complications that could arise and the monitoring of these devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.lpm.2019.10.013DOI Listing
October 2019

Rechallenge of carboplatin-gemcitabine based chemotherapy for rapidly progressing metastatic collecting duct carcinoma of the kidney leading to a delayed and durable complete response: A case report.

Oncol Lett 2019 Mar 29;17(3):3576-3580. Epub 2019 Jan 29.

Department of Medical Oncology, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Timone University Hospital, 13385 Marseille Cedex 5, France.

Renal collecting duct carcinoma (CDC) is a rare and highly aggressive subtype of kidney cancer with poor prognosis. We report a case of one patient, who was successfully treated with gemcitabine-platin based chemotherapy for polymetastatic renal CDC, and experienced a late and prolonged complete remission. In June 2014, a 69-year-old male patient was diagnosed with non-metastatic renal CDC. Nephrouretectomy was firstly performed. In December 2014, he developed a loco-regional recurrence with bilateral lung metastases. The patient started a course of gemcitabine-carboplatin (GC)-based first-line chemotherapy and received 6 cycles, which ended in May 2015. Computed tomography (CT) scan evaluation displayed an objective response according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and a follow-up of the patient was conducted. In August 2015, he had a second local relapse with new lung metastases. Despite a short disease-free interval, 6 cycles of the same GC regimen were required, which ended in February 2016. The patient firstly exhibited a partial objective response after the first 3 cycles and a stable disease at the end of chemotherapy. During the follow-up, a CT scan of his chest, abdomen and pelvis was performed every 3 months. From September 2016 to May 2017, despite no new specific treatments for his metastatic disease, the patient again experienced an objective and confirmed response on each CT-scan evaluation until complete remission in May 2017. This case report highlights the efficacy of GC-based chemotherapy, which is able to provide a durable and sometimes complete response in metastatic renal CDC, and suggests the potential of rechallenging with the same chemotherapy regimen, despite a short disease-free interval. The originality of this case was demonstrated by the delayed complete response more than one year after the end of GC-based second line chemotherapy. The patient remained disease-free at his last CT-scan evaluation in April 2018.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/ol.2019.9991DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6396167PMC
March 2019

Exercise stress CMR reveals reduced aortic distensibility and impaired right-ventricular adaptation to exercise in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

PLoS One 2018 31;13(12):e0208749. Epub 2018 Dec 31.

Aix-Marseille Univ, CNRS, CRMBM, Marseille, France.

Background: The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of exercise cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (RTOF) and to assess right and left ventricular adaptation and aortic wall response to exercise in comparison with volunteers.

Methods: 11 RTOF and 11 volunteers underwent prospective CMR at rest and during exercise. A supine bicycle ergometer was employed to reach twice the resting heart rate during continuous exercise, blood pressure and heart rate were recorded. Bi-ventricular parameters and aortic stiffness were assessed using accelerated cine sequences and flow-encoding CMR. A t-test was used to compare values between groups. A Mann Whitney test was used to compare values within groups.

Results: In RTOF both ventricles showed an impaired contractile reserve (RVEF rest 36.2±8.3%, +1.3±3.9% increase after exercise; LVEF rest 53.8±6.1%, +5.7±6.4% increase after exercise) compared to volunteers (RVEF rest 50.5±5.0%, +10.4±7.1% increase after exercise, p = 0.039; LVEF rest 61.9±3.1%, +12.2±4.7% increase after exercise, p = 0.014). RTOF showed a reduced distensibility of the ascending aorta during exercise compared to volunteers (RTOF: 3.4±1.9 10-3.mmHg-1 vs volunteers: 5.1±1.4 10-3.mmHg-1; p = 0.027). Ascending aorta distensibility was correlated to cardiac work in the volunteers but not in RTOF.

Conclusion: RTOF showed an impaired contractile reserve for both ventricles. The exercise unmasked a reduced distensibility of the ascending aorta in RTOF, which may be an early sign of increased aortic rigidity.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0208749PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6312273PMC
May 2019
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