Publications by authors named "Paul Curtiss"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Co-existence of PrP types 1 and 2 in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of the VV subgroup: phenotypic and prion protein characteristics.

Sci Rep 2020 01 30;10(1):1503. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

We report a detailed study of a cohort of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) VV1-2 type-mixed cases (valine homozygosity at codon 129 of the prion protein, PrP, gene harboring disease-related PrP, PrP, types 1 and 2). Overall, sCJDVV1-2 subjects showed mixed clinical and histopathological features, which often correlated with the relative amounts of the corresponding PrP type. However, type-specific phenotypic characteristics were only detected when the amount of the corresponding PrP type exceeded 20-25%. Overall, original features of types 1 (T1) and 2 (T2) in sCJDVV1 and -VV2, including rostrocaudal relative distribution and conformational indicators, were maintained in sCJDVV1-2 except for one of the two components of T1 identified by electrophoretic mobility as T1. The T1 conformational characteristics shifted in the presence of T2, inferring a conformational effect of PrP T2 on T1. The prevalence of sCJDVV1-2 was 23% or 57% of all sCJDVV cases, depending on whether standard or highly sensitive type-detecting procedures were adopted. This study, together with previous data from sCJDMM1-2 (methionine homozygosity at PrP gene codon 129) establishes the type-mixed sCJD variants as an important component of sCJD, which cannot be identified with current non-tissue based diagnostic tests of prion disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-58446-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6992672PMC
January 2020

Photolichenoid dermatitis: a presenting sign of human immunodeficiency virus.

Cutis 2019 Oct;104(4):242-244

Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA.

Photolichenoid dermatitis is an uncommon eruptive dermatitis that often occurs in association with a photosensitizing drug. Photodermatitis, in general, is an uncommon clinical manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), most often affecting patients of African and Native American descent. Photolichenoid dermatitis has infrequently been reported in patients with HIV who have not been exposed to a photosensitizing drug. We report a case of an African patient with a photodistributed depigmenting eruption without exposure to a photosensitizing drug. Histologic examination revealed a patchy perivascular and bandlike lymphocytic infiltrate with melanophages, interface changes, and dyskeratotic keratinocytes, consistent with photolichenoid dermatitis. Laboratory examination was significant for a positive HIV-2 antibody. Photolichenoid dermatitis may be a presenting sign of HIV infection and may not necessarily be associated with exposure to a photosensitizing drug. Testing for HIV should be done in patients who present with photodistributed depigmenting eruptions, even in the absence of exposure to a photosensitizing drug, and particularly in patients of African and Native American descent.
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October 2019

The readability, suitability, and content features of eczema action plans in the United States.

Pediatr Dermatol 2018 Nov 15;35(6):800-807. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, NYU School of Medicine, New York City, New York.

Background/objectives: Little is known about the reading grade level (readability), appropriateness of design (suitability), and content variability of written eczema action plans (EAPs), which can impact the effectiveness of these patient education tools. Here, we assess the readability, suitability, and content of EAPs currently used by pediatric dermatologists in the United States.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of EAPs submitted by members of the Society for Pediatric Dermatology (n = 26). Readability, suitability, and content of sampled plans were systematically assessed.

Results: Mean (SD) reading grade level was 9.0 (2.1); one in five was written at the recommended level of 6th grade or lower. While the majority of EAPs were found to be adequately suitable, one in five was unsuitable and only two superior. Documents scored most poorly in layout/design and learning stimulation. Plans scored best in the categories of content and literacy demand. EAPs focused on similar content themes, though specific recommendations and descriptors of atopic dermatitis (AD) disease states varied considerably.

Conclusions: The health literacy burden of EAPs in the United States could be lowered by improving their readability, incorporating graphics, stimulating reader engagement, and developing standards for how AD flares are defined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pde.13682DOI Listing
November 2018

Mycoplasma pneumoniae, more than a lung disease.

Dermatol Online J 2018 Jun 15;24(6). Epub 2018 Jun 15.

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.

Mycoplasma pneumoniae-induced rash and mucositis (MIRM) is a recently described clinical entity and should be considered in children who present with oral (94% of patients), ocular (82% of patients), and urogenital lesions (63% of patients). MIRM was first described as a distinct clinical entity from Stevens Johnson syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS)/(TEN) in 2015 [1]. As a new, uncommon diagnosis it frequently poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for pediatricians and dermatologists. We report a case of MIRM in a previously healthy 15-year-old boy.
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June 2018

Genital ulcers in an immunocompromised man.

JAAD Case Rep 2018 Aug 14;4(7):619-621. Epub 2018 Jul 14.

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2017.10.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6070680PMC
August 2018

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of topical nitrates in the treatment of primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2018 Jun 31;78(6):1110-1118.e3. Epub 2018 Mar 31.

Skin Lupus and Autoimmune Connective Tissue Section, The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York; Division of Rheumatology, The Department of Internal Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address:

Background: Multiple placebo-controlled trials have assessed locally applied topical nitrate preparations in treating Raynaud's phenomenon (RP).

Objectives: The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the effects of local topical nitrates in primary and secondary RP with respect to a combined end point integrating parameters of digital blood flow and clinical severity.

Methods: A systematic review was performed using MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane library. Only trials comparing locally applied topical nitrates with placebo comparators were included. Studies were appraised for bias by 2 independent reviewers.

Results: A total of 7 placebo-controlled trials including 346 patients were used in the meta-analysis; 4 trials used nitroglycerin ointments, 2 used the nitroglycerin gel vehicle MQX-503, and 1 used compounded nitrite. The meta-analysis results supported a moderate-to-large treatment effect in RP (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.35-1.05; P < .0001). Subgroup analyses showed a large treatment effect in secondary RP (SMD = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.25-1.65; P = .008) and moderate effect in primary RP (SMD = 0.45; 95% CI, 0.05-0.85; P = .03).

Limitations: Limitations include the inclusion of multiple topical nitrate preparations and integration of different outcomes assessments.

Conclusion: Local topical nitrates have significant efficacy in the treatment of both primary and secondary RP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2018.01.043DOI Listing
June 2018

The Frisbee maneuver: A novel method to abort acute attacks of the Raynaud phenomenon.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2018 03 7;78(3):e61. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.09.066DOI Listing
March 2018

Wood's lamp as a tool in the evaluation of morphea.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2018 02 7;78(2):e33-e34. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2017.10.003DOI Listing
February 2018

An Update on Kaposi's Sarcoma: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Treatment.

Dermatol Ther (Heidelb) 2016 Dec 1;6(4):465-470. Epub 2016 Nov 1.

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.

Kaposi's sarcoma is an angioproliferative neoplasm which has undergone considerable epidemiologic change since the original description by Moritz Kaposi in the late 1800s. This opportunistic neoplasm gained widespread notoriety within the US during the height of the AIDS epidemic, where it was frequently found co-occurring with opportunistic infections. With the advent of modern antiretroviral therapies, as well as an increasing number of individuals on immunosuppression for autoimmune disease or organ transplantation, the landscape of the immunocompromised individual has changed. It is now important for clinicians to be mindful of Kaposi's sarcoma manifesting in a growing variety of clinical contexts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13555-016-0152-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5120640PMC
December 2016

Synthetic Aβ peptides acquire prion-like properties in the brain.

Oncotarget 2015 Jan;6(2):642-50

Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.National Center for Regenerative Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, The People's Republic of China.

In transmission studies with Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models, the formation of Aβ plaques is proposed to be initiated by seeding the inoculated amyloid β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Like the misfolded scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) in prion diseases, Aβ in AD shows a certain degree of resistance to protease digestion while the biochemical basis for protease resistance of Aβ remains poorly understood. Using in vitro assays, histoblotting, and electron microscopy, we characterize the biochemical and morphological features of synthetic Aβ peptides and Aβ isolated from AD brain tissues. Consistent with previous observations, monomeric and oligomeric Aβ species extracted from AD brains are insoluble in detergent buffers and resistant to digestions with proteinase K (PK). Histoblotting of AD brain tissue sections exhibits an increased Aβ immunoreactivity after digestion with PK. In contrast, synthetic Aβ40 and Aβ42 are soluble in detergent buffers and fully digested by PK. Electron microscopy of Aβ40 and Aβ42 synthetic peptides shows that both species of Aβ form mature fibrils. Those generated from Aβ40 are longer but less numerous than those made of Aβ42. When spiked into human brain homogenates, both Aβ40 and Aβ42 acquire insolubility in detergent and resistance to PK. Our study favors the hypothesis that the human brain may contain cofactor(s) that confers the synthetic Aβ peptides PrPSc-like physicochemical properties.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4359245PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.2819DOI Listing
January 2015