Publications by authors named "Paul C Stromberg"

10 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts promotes angiogenesis in breast cancer.

PLoS One 2013 16;8(8):e71533. Epub 2013 Aug 16.

Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America.

Tumor fibroblasts are active partners in tumor progression, but the genes and pathways that mediate this collaboration are ill-defined. Previous work demonstrates that Ets2 function in stromal cells significantly contributes to breast tumor progression. Conditional mouse models were used to study the function of Ets2 in both mammary stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Conditional inactivation of Ets2 in stromal fibroblasts in PyMT and ErbB2 driven tumors significantly reduced tumor growth, however deletion of Ets2 in epithelial cells in the PyMT model had no significant effect. Analysis of gene expression in fibroblasts revealed a tumor- and Ets2-dependent gene signature that was enriched in genes important for ECM remodeling, cell migration, and angiogenesis in both PyMT and ErbB2 driven-tumors. Consistent with these results, PyMT and ErbB2 tumors lacking Ets2 in fibroblasts had fewer functional blood vessels, and Ets2 in fibroblasts elicited changes in gene expression in tumor endothelial cells consistent with this phenotype. An in vivo angiogenesis assay revealed the ability of Ets2 in fibroblasts to promote blood vessel formation in the absence of tumor cells. Importantly, the Ets2-dependent gene expression signatures from both mouse models were able to distinguish human breast tumor stroma from normal stroma, and correlated with patient outcomes in two whole tumor breast cancer data sets. The data reveals a key function for Ets2 in tumor fibroblasts in signaling to endothelial cells to promote tumor angiogenesis. The results highlight the collaborative networks that orchestrate communication between stromal cells and tumor cells, and suggest that targeting tumor fibroblasts may be an effective strategy for developing novel anti-angiogenic therapies.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071533PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3745457PMC
April 2014

Influence of submission form characteristics on clinical information received in biopsy accession.

J Vet Diagn Invest 2012 Nov 13;24(6):1073-82. Epub 2012 Sep 13.

Department of Animal and Food Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA.

Clinical information supplied to diagnostic laboratories through biopsy submission forms is crucial to accurate, timely diagnosis and to clinicopathologic correlation between microscopic findings and the clinical condition of the patient. The current study attempts to quantify the prevalence of deficient and inadequate submissions in veterinary biopsy service and to determine whether form characteristics, such as the open or closed nature of the form and the presence of specific prompts, influence reporting of essential case information. The hypotheses of this study are, first, that deficient and inadequate biopsy submissions do occur in veterinary medicine and, second, that open-type biopsy submission forms elicit quantitatively and qualitatively more complete case information overall, and in specific content areas, compared to closed-type biopsy submission forms. Three percent of submissions reviewed were information deficient, devoid of information beyond patient signalment, and more than 88% of forms supplied inadequate clinical information in at least 1 key content area. Both form type and specific prompts significantly influenced reporting of important clinical information. This study demonstrates the need and lays the foundation for informational completeness research in veterinary medicine.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1040638712458783DOI Listing
November 2012

CBA/J mice generate protective immunity to soluble Ag85 but fail to respond efficiently to Ag85 during natural Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

Eur J Immunol 2012 Apr;42(4):870-9

Center for Microbial Interface Biology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA.

In CBA/J mice, susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) is associated with low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses to antigens (Antigen 85 (Ag85) and early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6)) that have been defined as immunodominant. Here, we asked whether the failure of CBA/J mice to recognize Ag85 is a consequence of M.tb infection or whether CBA/J mice have a general defect in generating specific T-cell responses to this protein antigen. We compared CBA/J mice during primary M.tb infection, Ag85 vaccination followed by M.tb challenge, or M.tb memory immune mice for their capacity to generate Ag85-specific IFN-γ responses and to control M.tb infection. CBA/J mice did not respond efficiently to Ag85 in the context of natural infection or re-infection. In contrast, CBA/J mice could generate Ag85-specific IFN-γ responses and protective immunity when this antigen was delivered as a soluble protein. Our data indicate that although M.tb infection of CBA/J mice does not drive an Ag85 response, these mice can fully and protectively respond to Ag85 if it is delivered as a vaccine. The data from this experimental model suggest that the Ag85-containing vaccines in clinical trials should protect M.tb susceptible humans.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.201142054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641789PMC
April 2012

Pathology in practice. Reactive renal polyps and prostatic carcinoma.

J Am Vet Med Assoc 2011 Aug;239(4):447-9

Department of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2460/javma.239.4.447DOI Listing
August 2011

Pten in stromal fibroblasts suppresses mammary epithelial tumours.

Nature 2009 Oct;461(7267):1084-91

Department of Molecular Genetics, College of Biological Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

The tumour stroma is believed to contribute to some of the most malignant characteristics of epithelial tumours. However, signalling between stromal and tumour cells is complex and remains poorly understood. Here we show that the genetic inactivation of Pten in stromal fibroblasts of mouse mammary glands accelerated the initiation, progression and malignant transformation of mammary epithelial tumours. This was associated with the massive remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM), innate immune cell infiltration and increased angiogenesis. Loss of Pten in stromal fibroblasts led to increased expression, phosphorylation (T72) and recruitment of Ets2 to target promoters known to be involved in these processes. Remarkably, Ets2 inactivation in Pten stroma-deleted tumours ameliorated disruption of the tumour microenvironment and was sufficient to decrease tumour growth and progression. Global gene expression profiling of mammary stromal cells identified a Pten-specific signature that was highly represented in the tumour stroma of patients with breast cancer. These findings identify the Pten-Ets2 axis as a critical stroma-specific signalling pathway that suppresses mammary epithelial tumours.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature08486DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2767301PMC
October 2009

Adjuvant CCNU (lomustine) and prednisone chemotherapy for dogs with incompletely excised grade 2 mast cell tumors.

J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2009 Jan-Feb;45(1):14-8

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, 601 Vernon L. Tharp Street, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

The use of adjuvant 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU; lomustine) to treat incompletely excised canine mast cell tumors (MCTs) has not been evaluated. Medical records of 12 dogs with grade 2 MCT treated with incomplete surgical excision and adjuvant CCNU and prednisone chemotherapy were reviewed. Local recurrence rate, metastasis rate, and survival time were evaluated. None of the dogs developed local recurrence or regional/ distant metastases. Two dogs developed fatal liver failure. The 1- and 2-year progression-free rates of surviving dogs were 100% and 77%, respectively. Postoperative adjuvant CCNU appears to be a useful alternative to radiation therapy for incompletely excised canine cutaneous MCTs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5326/0450014DOI Listing
March 2009

Cervical thymoma originating in ectopic thymic tissue in a cat.

Vet Clin Pathol 2008 Dec;37(4):397-402

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and Veterinary Teaching Hospital, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

An 11-year-old female spayed domestic shorthair cat was referred to The Ohio State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (OSU-VTH) for evaluation of a 6 x 4 x 3.5 cm mass in the left midcervical region causing increased respiratory sounds and lateral deviation of the trachea. A fine needle aspirate of the mass was obtained before referral and the cytology results were compatible with a reactive lymph node. Immunocytochemistry showed increased numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes and small numbers of CD20+ and CD79a+ medium to large lymphocytes. Differential diagnoses from the referral pathologist were T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma and feline Hodgkin's-like lymphoma. A subsequent fine needle aspirate performed at the OSU-VTH showed similar results. On flow cytometry the majority of cells were CD3+ T lymphocytes that were double positive for CD4 and CD8 (73%), compatible with either a double-positive (CD4+CD8+) T-cell lymphoma or lymphocytes from ectopic thymic tissue. The mass was surgically removed. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the mass revealed a predominant population of CD3+ small lymphocytes and small numbers of medium to large lymphocytes with moderate anisocytosis and anysokaryosis. A population of cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells surrounded small microcystic structures filled with eosinophilic material and structures interpreted as Hassall's corpuscles. These findings were consistent with thymic tissue and a diagnosis of ectopic thymoma was made. PCR results for lymphocyte antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) were negative. The cat had no evidence of disease 16 months after removal of the mass. To our knowledge this is the first report of an ectopic cervical thymoma in a cat. The clinical and diagnostic features of this unusual case will be useful in helping veterinarians and pathologists obtain a presurgical diagnosis and establish a prognosis for similar lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1939-165X.2008.00061.xDOI Listing
December 2008

Important roles for macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CC chemokine ligand 2, and mononuclear phagocytes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis.

Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2007 Jul 12;176(1):78-89. Epub 2007 Apr 12.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, the Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

Rationale: An increase in the number of mononuclear phagocytes in lung biopsies from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) worsens prognosis. Chemokines that recruit mononuclear phagocytes, such as CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2), are elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF) from patients with IPF. However, little attention is given to the role of the mononuclear phagocyte survival and recruitment factor, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), in pulmonary fibrosis.

Objectives: To investigate the role of mononuclear phagocytes and M-CSF in pulmonary fibrosis.

Methods: Wild-type, M-CSF-/-, or CCL2-/- mice received intraperitoneal bleomycin. Lung inflammation and fibrosis were measured by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, collagen assay, BAL differentials, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis. Human and mouse macrophages were stimulated with M-CSF for CCL2 expression. BALF from patients with IPF was examined for M-CSF and CCL2.

Measurements And Main Results: M-CSF-/- and CCL2-/- mice had less lung fibrosis, mononuclear phagocyte recruitment, collagen deposition, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression after bleomycin administration than wild-type littermates. Human and mouse macrophages stimulated with M-CSF had increased CCL2 production, and intratracheal administration of M-CSF in mice induced CCL2 production in BALF. Finally, BALF from patients with IPF contained significantly more M-CSF and CCL2 than BALF from normal volunteers. Elevated levels of M-CSF were associated with elevated CCL2 in BALF and the diagnosis of IPF.

Conclusions: These data suggest that M-CSF contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in mice and in patients with IPF through the involvement of mononuclear phagocytes and CCL2 production.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1164/rccm.200609-1279OCDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2049062PMC
July 2007