Publications by authors named "Paul A Mulder"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Delineation of phenotypes and genotypes related to cohesin structural protein RAD21.

Hum Genet 2020 May 19;139(5):575-592. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

RAD21 encodes a key component of the cohesin complex, and variants in RAD21 have been associated with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS). Limited information on phenotypes attributable to RAD21 variants and genotype-phenotype relationships is currently published. We gathered a series of 49 individuals from 33 families with RAD21 alterations [24 different intragenic sequence variants (2 recurrent), 7 unique microdeletions], including 24 hitherto unpublished cases. We evaluated consequences of 12 intragenic variants by protein modelling and molecular dynamic studies. Full clinical information was available for 29 individuals. Their phenotype is an attenuated CdLS phenotype compared to that caused by variants in NIPBL or SMC1A for facial morphology, limb anomalies, and especially for cognition and behavior. In the 20 individuals with limited clinical information, additional phenotypes include Mungan syndrome (in patients with biallelic variants) and holoprosencephaly, with or without CdLS characteristics. We describe several additional cases with phenotypes including sclerocornea, in which involvement of the RAD21 variant is uncertain. Variants were frequently familial, and genotype-phenotype analyses demonstrated striking interfamilial and intrafamilial variability. Careful phenotyping is essential in interpreting consequences of RAD21 variants, and protein modeling and dynamics can be helpful in determining pathogenicity. The current study should be helpful when counseling families with a RAD21 variation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00439-020-02138-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7170815PMC
May 2020

Development, behaviour and autism in individuals with SMC1A variants.

J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2019 03 8;60(3):305-313. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Autism Team Northern-Netherlands, Jonx Department of Youth Mental Health and Autism, Lentis Psychiatric Institute, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Introduction: Development and behaviour in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), including autism characteristics, have been described infrequently stratified to genetic cause and only a few studies have considered behavioural characteristics in relation to developmental level. Here, we describe the behavioural phenotype in individuals with CdLS with SMC1A variants.

Methods: We performed an international, interdisciplinary study on 51 individuals with SMC1A variants. Results of questionnaire studies are compared to those in individuals with Down Syndrome and with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Results on cognition and self-injurious behaviour (SIB) are compared to those in individuals with CdLS caused by NIPBL variants. For Dutch participants with SMC1A variants we performed direct in-person assessments of cognition, autism, and added an interview and questionnaire on adaptive behaviour and sensory processing.

Results: Individuals with SMC1A variants show a higher cognitive level and less SIB than individuals with NIPBL variants. Individuals with SMC1A variants without classic CdLS phenotype but with a Rett-like phenotype show more severe intellectual disability and more SIB compared to those with a CdLS phenotype. Autism is less present if outcomes in direct in-person assessments are evaluated taking developmental level into account compared to results based on a questionnaire.

Conclusions: Behaviour in individuals with CdLS should be evaluated taking genetic cause into account. Detailed interdisciplinary approaches are of clinical importance to inform tailored care and may eventually improve quality of life of patients and families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12979DOI Listing
March 2019

Diagnosis and management of Cornelia de Lange syndrome: first international consensus statement.

Nat Rev Genet 2018 10;19(10):649-666

Danbury Public Schools, Danbury, CT, USA.

Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is an archetypical genetic syndrome that is characterized by intellectual disability, well-defined facial features, upper limb anomalies and atypical growth, among numerous other signs and symptoms. It is caused by variants in any one of seven genes, all of which have a structural or regulatory function in the cohesin complex. Although recent advances in next-generation sequencing have improved molecular diagnostics, marked heterogeneity exists in clinical and molecular diagnostic approaches and care practices worldwide. Here, we outline a series of recommendations that document the consensus of a group of international experts on clinical diagnostic criteria, both for classic CdLS and non-classic CdLS phenotypes, molecular investigations, long-term management and care planning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41576-018-0031-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7136165PMC
October 2018

Further delineation of Malan syndrome.

Hum Mutat 2018 09 25;39(9):1226-1237. Epub 2018 Jun 25.

Belfast HSC Trust, Northern Ireland Regional Genetics Service, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

Malan syndrome is an overgrowth disorder described in a limited number of individuals. We aim to delineate the entity by studying a large group of affected individuals. We gathered data on 45 affected individuals with a molecularly confirmed diagnosis through an international collaboration and compared data to the 35 previously reported individuals. Results indicate that height is > 2 SDS in infancy and childhood but in only half of affected adults. Cardinal facial characteristics include long, triangular face, macrocephaly, prominent forehead, everted lower lip, and prominent chin. Intellectual disability is universally present, behaviorally anxiety is characteristic. Malan syndrome is caused by deletions or point mutations of NFIX clustered mostly in exon 2. There is no genotype-phenotype correlation except for an increased risk for epilepsy with 19p13.2 microdeletions. Variants arose de novo, except in one family in which mother was mosaic. Variants causing Malan and Marshall-Smith syndrome can be discerned by differences in the site of stop codon formation. We conclude that Malan syndrome has a well recognizable phenotype that usually can be discerned easily from Marshall-Smith syndrome but rarely there is some overlap. Differentiation from Sotos and Weaver syndrome can be made by clinical evaluation only.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23563DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175110PMC
September 2018

Phenotypes and genotypes in individuals with SMC1A variants.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 Aug 26;173(8):2108-2125. Epub 2017 May 26.

Autism Team Northern-Netherlands, Jonx Department of Youth Mental Health and Autism, Lentis Psychiatric Institute, Groningen, the Netherlands.

SMC1A encodes one of the proteins of the cohesin complex. SMC1A variants are known to cause a phenotype resembling Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Exome sequencing has allowed recognizing SMC1A variants in individuals with encephalopathy with epilepsy who do not resemble CdLS. We performed an international, interdisciplinary study on 51 individuals with SMC1A variants for physical and behavioral characteristics, and compare results to those in 67 individuals with NIPBL variants. For the Netherlands all known individuals with SMC1A variants were studied, both with and without CdLS phenotype. Individuals with SMC1A variants can resemble CdLS, but manifestations are less marked compared to individuals with NIPBL variants: growth is less disturbed, facial signs are less marked (except for periocular signs and thin upper vermillion), there are no major limb anomalies, and they have a higher level of cognitive and adaptive functioning. Self-injurious behavior is more frequent and more severe in the NIPBL group. In the Dutch group 5 of 13 individuals (all females) had a phenotype that shows a remarkable resemblance to Rett syndrome: epileptic encephalopathy, severe or profound intellectual disability, stereotypic movements, and (in some) regression. Their missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations are evenly spread over the gene. We conclude that SMC1A variants can result in a phenotype resembling CdLS and a phenotype resembling Rett syndrome. Resemblances between the SMC1A group and the NIPBL group suggest that a disturbed cohesin function contributes to the phenotype, but differences between these groups may also be explained by other underlying mechanisms such as moonlighting of the cohesin genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38279DOI Listing
August 2017

Behaviour in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: a systematic review.

Dev Med Child Neurol 2017 04 18;59(4):361-366. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

Autism Team Northern-Netherlands, Jonx Department of Youth Mental Health and Autism, Lentis Psychiatric Institute, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Aim: Careful study and accurate description of behaviour are important to understand developmental challenges for individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). Here we present a systematic review of current understanding of behaviour in CdLS.

Method: A systematic search was performed for articles published between January 1946 and December 2015 evaluating autism, self-injury, and/or cognition in CdLS. After study-selection, 43 papers were included. The Cochrane quality criteria were adjusted to assign quality scores to the included studies.

Results: Participants were mostly categorized in the severe/profound developmental level. Methodology and quality were very heterogeneous, as well as reporting occurrence of autism. Self-injurious behaviour was reported in 15 papers. Physical conditions were reported in 21 studies, mostly related to hearing and vision. Only nine studies mentioned details about medication.

Interpretation: Comparison of presented results was hindered by heterogeneous assessment methods. Improving our understanding of behavioural characteristics in CdLS requires more uniform methodology. We propose a criterion standard of instruments that can ideally be used in assessment of behaviour and development. This will improve understanding of behaviour in the context of developmental level and daily functioning.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.13361DOI Listing
April 2017