Publications by authors named "Pattamapan Lomarat"

5 Publications

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Mass spectral analysis of secondary metabolites from Zingiber montanum rhizome extract using UHPLC-HR-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS.

Phytochem Anal 2021 May 30. Epub 2021 May 30.

Department of Pharmacognosy and Center of Innovative Pharmacy for Pharmaceutical and Herbal Product Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Introduction: Zingiber montanum (J.Koenig) Link ex A.Dietr. is a popular medicinal plant in Thailand. Its rhizomes have been used as an ingredient in various Thai traditional medicine formulas. While many reports have focused on the chemical constituents and biological activities of this plant, a comprehensive study on secondary metabolite profiling using tandem mass spectrometry has, to this point, never been documented.

Objective: To analyze the chemical constituents in Z. montanum rhizomes using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high-resolution electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HR-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS) analyses and to utilize the characteristic fragmentation patterns of these compounds to facilitate their identification.

Methodology: UHPLC-HR-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS in positive ion mode was used for chemical identification of secondary metabolites from the ethanolic extract of the plant material. MS/MS data of some known reference compounds, together with detailed fragmentation pattern information of several compounds obtained from the crude extract, were used to elucidate their chemical structures.

Results: In this work, one benzaldehyde, ten phenylbutenoid monomers, six curcuminoids, and nine phenylbutenoid dimers were assigned based on their characteristic fragment ions. Among these compounds, 2-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)oxirane was tentatively suggested as a potential new compound. Several characteristic fragment ions from these compounds were assigned and the relative ion abundance of these was also used to differentiate the chemical structures of compounds having the same molecular mass.

Conclusions: The results will benefit future high-throughput screening of bioactive compounds and method development for the quality control of raw materials and herbal drugs derived from Z. montanum rhizome extracts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pca.3068DOI Listing
May 2021

Thai Fruits Exhibit Antioxidant Activity and Induction of Antioxidant Enzymes in HEK-293 Cells.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2016 18;2016:6083136. Epub 2016 Dec 18.

Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400, Thailand.

The cellular antioxidant enzymes play the important role of protecting the cells and organisms from the oxidative damage. Natural antioxidants contained in fruits have attracted considerable interest because of their presumed safety and potential nutritional value. Even though antioxidant activities of many fruits have been reported, the effects of phytochemicals contained in fruits on the induction of antioxidant enzymes in the cells have not been fully defined. In this study, we showed that extracts from , , , , and inhibited HO-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species production in HEK-293 cells. Additionally, these Thai fruit extracts increased the mRNA and protein expressions of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, and manganese superoxide dismutase. The consumption of Thai fruits rich in phenolic compounds may reduce the risk of oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6083136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5203924PMC
December 2016

In vitro study of anti-coccidial activity of essential oils from indigenous plants against Eimeria tenella.

Vet Parasitol 2016 Sep 28;228:96-102. Epub 2016 Aug 28.

Natural Product for Animal Production Research and Testing Development Center, Center of Excellent, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen Campus, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand; Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture at Kamphaeng Saen, Kasetsart University, Kamphaeng Saen Campus, Nakhon Pathom 73140, Thailand. Electronic address:

This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro anticoccidial properties against Eimeria tenella of different essential oils and their major active components. Efficacy of ten essential oils from different Thai indigenous plants were preliminarily screened and only those with potential were further tested for effective concentrations and identifying their active compounds. Oocysticidal property was evaluated in term of sporulation inhibition of oocysts and the percentage of unsporulated, sporulated and degenerated oocysts, after treatment with 125μg/ml of the selected essential oil, the sample was enumerated by haemocytometer, while coccidiocidal activity was assessed by the inhibition of sporozoite invasion in MDBK cell lines. Results showed that only Boesenbergia pandurata and Ocimum basilicum essential oils had strong sporulation inhibition activity by providing a higher ratio of degenerated oocysts and their IC were 0.134 and 0.101mg/ml, respectively. GC-MS analysis of B. pandurata essential oil found trans-b-ocimene, camphor, 1,8-cineole, geraniol, camphene, methyl cinnamate, l-limonene and linalool as the major components, while methyl chavicol, α-bergamotene, 1,8-cineole and trans-β-ocimene were the main compounds of O. basilicum essential oil. Methyl cinnamate and camphor were the active components of B. pandurata oil, whereas methyl chavicol was the active component of O. basilicum oil by exhibiting the oocysticidal effect against E. tenella with IC values of 0.008, 0.023 and 0.054mg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, B. pandurata and O. basilicum oils also showed a strong cytotoxic property against coccidia with more than 70% inhibition of sporozoite invasion in MDBK cell lines, and their IC were 0.004 and 0.004mg/ml, respectively. Methyl cinnamate as well as camphor from B. pandurata and methyl chavicol from O. basilicum were also effective with IC values of 0.029, 0.023, and 0.022mg/ml, respectively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetpar.2016.08.020DOI Listing
September 2016

Bioactivity-guided Separation of the Active Compounds in Acacia pennata Responsible for the Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease.

Nat Prod Commun 2015 Aug;10(8):1431-4

The objective of this study was to evaluate the health benefits of plants used in Thai food, specifically Acacia pennata Willd., in Alzheimer's prevention. A. pennata twigs strongly inhibited β-amyloid aggregation. Bioactivity-guided separation of the active fractions yielded six known compounds, tetracosane (1), 1-(heptyloxy)-octadecane (2), methyl tridecanoate (3), arborinone (4), confertamide A (5) and 4-hydroxy-1-methyl-pyrrolidin-2-carboxylic acid (6). The structures were determined by spectroscopic analysis. Biological testing revealed that tetracosane (1) was the most potent inhibitor of β-amyloid aggregation, followed by 1-(heptyloxy)-octadecane (2) with IC50 values of 0.4 and 12.3 μM. Methyl tridecanoate (3), arborinone (4) and 4-hydroxy-1-methyl-pyrrolidin-2-carboxylic acid (6) moderately inhibited β-amyloid aggregation. In addition, tetracosane (1) and methyl tridecanoate (3) weakly inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE). These results suggested that the effect of A. pennata on Alzheimer's disease was likely due to the inhibition of β-amyloid aggregation. Thus A. pennata may be beneficial for Alzheimer's prevention.
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August 2015

Bioautography-guided isolation of antibacterial compounds of essential oils from Thai spices against histamine-producing bacteria.

Pak J Pharm Sci 2013 May;26(3):473-7

Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

The outbreak of histamine fish poisoning has been being an issue in food safety and international trade. The growth of contaminated bacterial species including Morganella morganii which produce histidine decarboxylase causes histamine formation in fish during storage. Histamine, the main toxin, causes mild to severe allergic reaction. At present, there is no well-established solution for histamine fish poisoning. This study was performed to determine the antibacterial activity of essential oils from Thai spices against histamine-producing bacteria. Among the essential oils tested, clove, lemongrass and sweet basil oils were found to possess the antibacterial activity. Clove oil showed the strongest inhibitory activity against Morganella morganii, followed by lemongrass and sweet basil oils. The results indicated that clove, lemongrass and sweet basil oils could be useful for the control of histamine-producing bacteria. The attempt to identify the active components using preparative TLC and GC/MS found eugenol, citral and methyl chavicol as the active components of clove, lemongrass and sweet basil oils, respectively. The information from this study would be useful in the research and development for the control of histamine-producing bacteria in fish or seafood products to reduce the incidence of histamine fish poisoning.
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May 2013
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