Publications by authors named "Patryk Matkowski"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Influence of Fraction Particle Size of Pure Straw and Blends of Straw with Calcium Carbonate or Cassava Starch on Pelletising Process and Pellet.

Materials (Basel) 2020 Oct 16;13(20). Epub 2020 Oct 16.

Department of Applied Mathematics, Institute of Information Technology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland.

The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure agglomeration process of wheat straw (WS) and the blends of WS with calcium carbonate (CC) or cassava straw (CS) with a ratio of 6% wt./wt. from seven separate fractions with sizes in the range of 0.21-2.81 mm. The agglomeration was performed at a moisture of 30% wb and a material temperature of 78 °C, with a dose of 0.1 g, in a die of diameter 8 mm and height 80 mm. The effects of the process were evaluated based on the compaction parameters and the pellets' density, tensile strength, and water absorption. The incorporation of additives into the WS improved the pellet process and quality. Refined results were achieved after adding CC, as compared to those achieved after adding CS, and the preferred particle size was in the range of 1.00-1.94 mm. This was because, under the given conditions, the back pressure in the die chamber significantly increased, allowing the achievement of a single pellet density of 800 kg·m. The pellets were resistant to compressive loads and cracked only at tensile strength of 6 MPa and a specific compression work of 6.5 mJ·mm. The addition of CC to the WS improved the strength of the adhesive and the cohesive bonds between the particles. The water absorption for the uncrushed pellets was considerably less than that for crushed pellets, which results in the safer storage of uncrushed pellets and excellent moisture absorption of crushed pellets. The addition of CC to the WS offers benefits in the form of pellet strength with a high water absorption capability. Notably, a study of crushed pellet litter under broiler rearing conditions and an analysis of the operational costs of using WS additives are required for implementing this study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma13204623DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7602947PMC
October 2020

Characterisation of Wheat Straw Pellets Individually and in Combination with Cassava Starch or Calcium Carbonate under Various Compaction Conditions: Determination of Pellet Strength and Water Absorption Capacity.

Materials (Basel) 2020 Oct 1;13(19). Epub 2020 Oct 1.

Department of Biosystems Engineering, Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland.

This study aimed to optimise the production conditions of wheat straw (WS) pellets and pellets with the additives of cassava starch (CS) or calcium carbonate (CC) based on the criteria of pellet strength and water absorption by crushed pellets. The pellets produced using a 2-10%-wt/wt additive ratio, material moisture of 10-30% w.b., die height of 66-86 mm, and material temperature of 78-108 °C were tested. The influence these factors on the strength parameters of pellets was different than on the water absorption by the crushed pellets. The pellets made of WS blended with CC additive were characterised by better strength parameters and the compressed pellets were characterised by better water absorption than those with CS. High and positive correlation among specific pellet compression work, elasticity modulus for pellet compression, and tensile strength values were observed. As the strength parameters of pellets showed high correlation with single pellet density, for the consistency of conclusions, the optimal conditions for pellet production were assumed based on the density. For optimal conditions at 4% wt/wt additive ratio, 23% w.b. material moisture, 78 mm die height, and 80 °C material temperature, the specific pellet compression work was 3.22 mJ·mm, elasticity modulus was 5.78 MPa, and maximum tensile strength of the pellets was 2.68 MPa; moreover, the water absorption by crushed pellets amounted to 2.60 g HO·g of dry matter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma13194375DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7579381PMC
October 2020