Publications by authors named "Patrizia Amici"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Intolerance of Uncertainty: From Transdiagnostic Model to Clinical Management.

Authors:
Patrizia Amici

Psychiatr Danub 2021 Sep;33(Suppl 9):22-25

via Garibaldi, 3, 24030 Mapello (BG), Italy,

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought out in some individuals an intolerance of uncertainty in their current circumstances. Intolerance of uncertainty is a transdiagnostic process that envisages future events as threatening and undesirable, with which the individual has little or no ability to cope. This makes such individuals more vulnerable to worry and negative emotions, as well as to developing various disorders. This article briefly analyzes how this has manifested during the COVID-19 pandemic and outlines some brief therapeutic techniques which have proved useful in patient's management.
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September 2021

Humor in the Age of COVID-19 Lockdown: An Explorative Qualitative Study.

Authors:
Patrizia Amici

Psychiatr Danub 2020 Sep;32(Suppl 1):15-20

Associazione "Un Porto per Noi" - ODV, P.zza Risorgimento 7 - 24100 Bergamo, Italy,

Background: This study seeks to explore the use of humor during the period of isolation caused by lockdown measures imposed in Italy as a result of the Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

Subjects And Method: The study is based on a non-clinical sample. The ad hoc questionnaire measures people's readiness to search for, publish and distribute humorous material during lockdown. It investigates the intentions behind sending content via social media (WhatsApp or similar) and the emotions experienced on receiving such content.

Results: The responses have been analyzed quantitatively, and using Excel's IF function they have been analyzed qualitatively. In the present sample of 106 Italian respondents, searching for content was less common than publishing it (yes 44.34%, no 54.72%). Positive emotions were more frequently the motivation (total 61.32%). A high percentage sent amusing content via social media or SMS (79%). Responses demonstrating a desire to lessen the situation's negative impact or a desire for cohesion were common. Receiving material was similarly associated with positive emotions and a sense of being close to others.

Conclusions: humorous material appears to have served as a means of transmitting positive emotions, distancing oneself from negative events and finding cohesion.
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September 2020

A New Rating Scale (SAVE-9) to Demonstrate the Stress and Anxiety in the Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Viral Epidemic.

Psychiatr Danub 2020 Sep;32(Suppl 1):5-9

Psychiatric Studies Center (Cen.Stu.Psi.), Piazza Portici, 11 - 25050 Provaglio d'Iseo (BS), Italy,

The COVID-19 epidemic has been a major global public health problem during past months in Italy and in several other Countries and on the date of publication of this article, is still a serious public health problem. The health staff, engaged in the care of the sick and in the prevention of the spread of the infection have been subjected to a further increase in psychological difficulties and work-related stress, related to the workload for the continuous influx of sick and intense and close working shifts for the viral emergency. The SAVE-9 (Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics - 9 items) scale has been developed as a tool for assessing work anxiety and stress in response to the viral epidemic of health professionals working to prevent the spread of the virus and to treat infected people.
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September 2020

The Humor in Therapy: the Healing Power of Laughter.

Authors:
Patrizia Amici

Psychiatr Danub 2019 Sep;31(Suppl 3):503-508

Association "Un Porto per Noi- ONLUS", via Garibaldi, 3, Mapello, Bergamo, Italy,

Although humour is a key element of human communication, and, for this reason, it is also present in therapeutic contexts, its use in this sense still remains largely untapped. The purpose of this article is to increase curiosity and broaden the reflection on the use of humour in the psychotherapeutic relationship. The first part is dedicated to a short review of the main theories on the origins of laughter. The second part will examine those studies reporting a beneficial effect of humour on physical well-being, while the third part will review those studies describing how humour can help improve psychological well-being. The fourth part will further explore the clinical effects of humour in the therapeutic relationship. Both the positive and negative effects of humour in the therapeutic relationship will be discussed. In addition, some brief examples are included.
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September 2019
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