Publications by authors named "Patrick Ying"

5 Publications

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Successful Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Catatonia After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

Psychosomatics 2020 Sep 2. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Rehabilitation Medicine, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.08.009DOI Listing
September 2020

Successful Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Catatonia After Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

Psychosomatics 2020 Sep 2. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Departments of Psychiatry, Neurology, and Rehabilitation Medicine, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, New York, NY.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2020.08.009DOI Listing
September 2020

Psychiatric consequences of actual versus feared and perceived bed bug infestations: a case series examining a current epidemic.

Psychosomatics 2012 Jan-Feb;53(1):85-91

Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2011.08.001DOI Listing
April 2012

Informed consent and electroconvulsive therapy.

J Am Psychiatr Nurses Assoc 2011 May-Jun;17(3):219-22

NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1078390311408604DOI Listing
November 2011

Three-year medication prophylaxis in panic disorder: to continue or discontinue? A naturalistic study.

Compr Psychiatry 2007 Sep-Oct;48(5):419-25. Epub 2007 Jul 5.

Freedom from Fear, Staten Island, NY 10305, USA.

Objective: Little is known about maintenance treatment for panic disorder. The purpose of this naturalistic study is to compare outcomes of remitted panic disorder patients continued on versus those successfully discontinued from maintenance medication.

Methods: After 3 years of sustained remission with medication in a naturalistic setting, 168 patients were continued on, whereas 37 successfully discontinued from medication. Continued and discontinued groups were followed for an additional 4 to 8 years and compared for differences in treatment outcome using chi(2) and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Times to relapse were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and risk factors for relapse were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression.

Results: The discontinued group was healthier at baseline but had a significantly worse outcome compared with the continued group. Panic-free survival probabilities for the continued group at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years were 0.87, 0.81, 0.71, and 0.64, respectively, and were significantly higher than respective probabilities of 0.53, 0.35, 0.29, and 0.15 for the discontinued group. Median survival time in the continued group was significantly longer, at 5.67 years, than in the discontinued group, at 1.17 years. Cognitive behavioral therapy significantly reduced hazard in the discontinued but not in the continued group. Residual symptoms in either group at time of assignment predicted poorer outcome.

Conclusion: Our small study suggests that relapse of panic disorder in routine clinical practice occurs even after long-standing remission on maintenance medication, and that relapse risk appears to be markedly higher after medication discontinuation. Discontinuation may be more successful in candidates who received cognitive behavioral therapy and have minimal residual symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2007.04.003DOI Listing
October 2007