Publications by authors named "Patricija Sesar"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Hemoglobin A1c in Patients with Glioblastoma-A Preliminary Study.

World Neurosurg 2020 09 31;141:e553-e558. Epub 2020 May 31.

Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia; Department of Surgery, Zagreb University School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Glioblastomas are among the most common primary brain tumors with an abysmal prognosis. The significance of glucose metabolism in glioblastoma cell metabolism and proliferation is well-known. However, a significant correlation between the systemic metabolic status of the patient and the cellular proliferation of the glioblastoma has not yet been established.

Methods: Our aim was to observe and analyze for a possible correlation between glioblastoma cellular proliferation and patients' glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels as a marker of chronic systemic glycemia. We analyzed the data from 25 patients and compared their Ki-67 values with their preoperative HbA1c values.

Results: We observed a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.03) between chronic glycemia (measured using HbA1c) and the cellular proliferation of glioblastoma (measured by cellular Ki-67 expression).

Conclusions: These results imply a possible positive correlation between glioblastoma cell proliferation and chronic systemic glycemia, a correlation that, to the best of our knowledge, has not yet been reported. Further research in this area could not only lead to a better understanding of glioblastoma but also have significant clinical applications in treating this devastating disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wneu.2020.05.231DOI Listing
September 2020

A biphasic tumor in posterior cranial fossa and the pineal region in young adult.

Surg Neurol Int 2020 11;11:64. Epub 2020 Apr 11.

Departments of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

Background: Biphasic tumors of the central nervous system are rarely described and mainly consisted out of the glial and mesenchymal component. The tumor originated out of both astrocytes and pinealocytes, best to our knowledge, has not been described. We present a case of a brain tumor consisted out of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) and pineocytoma as components situated in the pineal region and posterior cranial fossa in young adult.

Case Description: We present a 21-year-old patient with a history of intermittent headache, followed by nausea and vomiting, double vision, and dextropulsion. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extensive cystic-solid expansive formation in the posterior cranial fossa with a solid part in the area of the pineal gland. The patient underwent surgical resection. The pathohistological analysis showed two types of tumor cells; the major part of tumor showed features of PA, while minor part corresponded to pineocytoma.

Conclusion: PA accounts for 5% of all gliomas and is most common in children and young adults. It usually occurs in the cerebellum, the optic pathway, third ventricular region, etc. Pineocytomas are rare, accounting up to 1% of all intracranial tumors. Since tumors origin is different, there must be complex molecular events or mutations that can lead to cell rearrangements and generation of two histologically different tissues in the same tumor mass. The course of treatment options is different for PA and pineocytoma; therefore, the case of brain mass consisted out of two different tissues can be helpful when deciding about the treatment of tumors in posterior cranial fossa and pineal region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.25259/SNI_288_2019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7193197PMC
April 2020

HbA1c in patients with intracranial meningiomas WHO grades I and II: A preliminary study.

IUBMB Life 2020 07 5;72(7):1426-1432. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Department of Neurosurgery, Clinical Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

Meningiomas are among the most common primary brain tumors. There is a growing need for novel ways of differentiating between benign (World Health Organization [WHO] grade I) and atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas as well as for novel markers of the tumor's future behavior. A difference between glucose metabolism in atypical and benign meningiomas is well known. However, a significant correlation between the systemic metabolic status of the patient and the meningioma WHO grade has not yet been established. Our aim was to compare the WHO grades of intracranial meningiomas with the patient's HbA1c levels as a more reliable marker of the chronic systemic metabolic status than the fasting blood glucose value, which is usually looked at. We retrospectively analyzed 15 patients and compared their meningioma WHO grade with their preoperative HbA1c values. Our results show that patients with benign intracranial meningiomas have significantly lower HbA1c value. Conversely, patients with atypical intracranial meningiomas have higher HbA1c values. Furthermore, we showed that the proliferation factor Ki67 was statistically strongly correlated with the HbA1c value (p < .001. These results imply a possible positive correlation between meningioma cell proliferation and the chronic systemic glycemia. Further research in this area could not only lead to better understanding of meningiomas but could have significant clinical application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.2268DOI Listing
July 2020

Intracranial Mature Teratoma in an Adult Patient: A Case Report.

J Neurol Surg Rep 2019 Jan 3;80(1):e14-e17. Epub 2019 Apr 3.

Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Dubrava, Zagreb, Croatia.

: Primary intracranial teratoma is a subtype of germ cell tumors, classified into three subtypes. They occur very rarely, with only several reported individual cases in adults.  We present a patient with an intermittent headache in the right frontal region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a right sided high frontal parasagittal mass that compressed the falx, the right lateral ventricle, as well as the brain parenchyma. Patient underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological analysis described mature teratoma. Four months after the surgical treatment there were no signs of residual intracranial mass or relapse.  Primary intracranial teratoma in adults has a nonspecific clinical presentation. MRI reveals a solitary irregular mass with multilocularity and mixed signals derived from different tissues. The patients age, biochemical markers, and patohistological analysis are necessary to confirm the diagnosis.  Teratoma treatment strategy still remains controversial. It includes radical resection whenever possible. Since the residual portion of mature teratoma may contain part of immature or malignant tissue, tumor recurrence after surgical removal is possible. Also, new tumor mass could occur at other sites intracranial after the initial one was removed. Thus, although patients usually recover, they should be followed-up for a long period of time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1685213DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447400PMC
January 2019

[Adrenal myelolipoma--report of 15 patients].

Acta Med Croatica 2013 Jun;67(3):255-8

Myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-functioning tumor most frequently located in the adrenal cortex. It consists of mature fatty tissue with components of hematopoietic tissue in different proportions. There are certain ambiguities related to the diagnosis and therapy of myelolipoma, and it is therefore important to keep in view all the aspects of the lesion and the circumstances in which it develops. This paper presents a series of 15 patients with myelolipoma diagnosed at the Ljudevit Jurak Department of Pathology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center. Out of 15 patients, 10 were men (one of them with bilateral tumor) aged 41 to 73, and 5 were women aged 51 to 54. Macroscopically, the tumors were oval, encapsulated, yellowish, soft masses located in the adrenal glands. The diameter of the tumors ranged between 0.5 and 13.9 cm. Microscopically, they consisted of multiplied mature adipose cells combined with myeloid tissue composed largely of megakaryocytes, erythroid cells and lymphocytes. In all patients, the postoperative course was uneventful with no recurrences.
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June 2013