Publications by authors named "Patricia Virginia Stagnitta"

3 Publications

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Clostridium perfringens: Comparative effects of heat and osmotic stress on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic strains.

Anaerobe 2016 Jun 21;39:105-13. Epub 2016 Mar 21.

Departamento de Química Biológica Facultad de Química Bioquímica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis, Argentina. Electronic address:

Clostridium perfringens isolates associated with food poisoning carries a chromosomal cpe gene, while non-foodborne human gastrointestinal disease isolates carry a plasmid cpe gene. The enterotoxigenic strains tested produced vegetative cells and spores with significantly higher resistance than non-enterotoxigenic strains. These results suggest that the vegetative cells and spores have a competitive advantage over non-enterotoxigenic strains. However, no explanation has been provided for the significant associations between chromosomal cpe genotypes with the high resistance, which could explain the strong relationship between chromosomal cpe isolates and C. perfringens type A food poisoning. Here, we analyse the action of physical and chemical agent on non-enterotoxigenic and enterotoxigenic regional strains. And this study tested the relationship between the sensitivities of spores and their levels SASPs (small acid soluble proteins) production in the same strains examined.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anaerobe.2016.03.007DOI Listing
June 2016

Characterization of the plasmidic or chromosomal cpe gene and metabolic activities in Clostridium perfringens isolates from food in San Luis--Argentina.

Cent Eur J Public Health 2011 Mar;19(1):46-53

General Microbiology, Area of Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, San Luis National University, Argentina.

Food poisoning and non-food poisoning illnesses due to C. perfringens (by enterotoxin production) have been associated to chromosomal or plasmidic location of the cpe gene, respectively. Clostridial pathogenicity has been correlated to protease and azoreductase production. The aim of this work was: i) to assess the sanitary-hygienic quality of dehydrated soups (100 samples) consumed in San Luis - Argentina; ii) to verify the presence of C. perfringens in these food products using the "Most Probable Number" method (MPN) and plate-counting methods; iii) to characterise enterotoxigenicity in strain isolates by RPLA; iv) to determine the chromosomal or plasmidic location of the cpe gene in enterotoxigenic strains previously isolated from food in our lab, using PCR; v) to correlate chromosomal cpe and spore heat-resistance; vi) to compare protease activity in cpe+ and cpe- strains; and vii) to compare azoreductase activity in cpe+ and cpe- strains. Twenty-six isolates had a count a 3-43 bacteria g(-1) count using MPN; 7.7% exceeded the Argentine Food Code (CAA) limit. All isolates showed protease activity: enterotoxigenic isolates had higher protease activity than non-enterotoxigenic isolates. All isolates showed azoreductase activity: enterotoxigenic isolates had higher activity and shorter reducing times. Enterotoxigenic isolates showed chromosomal location for the gene responsible for the enterotoxin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21101/cejph.a3597DOI Listing
March 2011

Prevalence and characterization of Clostridium perfringens from spices in Argentina.

Anaerobe 2005 Dec 7;11(6):327-34. Epub 2005 Jul 7.

General Microbiology, Department of Biochemistry and Biological Sciences, Faculty of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacy, San Luis National University, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700-San Luis, Argentina.

Spices can present high microbial counts and Clostridium perfringens, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella and Shigella, among others have been isolated from spices. C. perfringens is an important pathogen agent causing, among other diseases, enteritis in humans caused by C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) which causes human food poisoning and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. The aims of the present work were (i) to establish the hygienic sanitary quality of some spices in San Luis, Argentina; (ii) to determine the presence of C. perfringens in these spices by means of the most probable number (MPN) and count on plate methods; (iii) to characterize the enterotoxigenic strains of C. perfringens by PCR and immunological methods such as reverse passive latex agglutination (RPLA) and (iv) to type by PCR C. perfringens strains isolated. A total of 115 samples of spices, 67 of which were purchased in local retail stores and 48 domestically collected were analysed. Total aerobe counts on tryptone glucose yeast extract agar medium of the 115 samples were between <10 and 10(6) CFU/g. The colifecal counts using Mac Conkey broth of the 115 samples were <4-10(3)CFU/g, with 28 samples (24.34%) exceeding the limit established by the Spanish Alimentary Code (10 CFU/g) while 2 samples (1.73%) had a sulfite reducing anaerobe load above standard limits. A total of 14 C. perfringens strains (12.17%) were isolated and characterized from 115 samples by the standard biochemical tests. Four of which (28.60%) turned out to be enterotoxigenic by PCR and RPLA. In order to type C. perfringens strains based on their main toxins, the 14 strains were analysed by PCR. All strains belonged to type A. All RPLA positive strains were cpe(+) by PCR. The percentage of enterotoxigenic strains was more elevated that those reported in other studies for this type of sample. These results indicate that sanitary conditions in different production stages of species must be improved to reduce health hazards. The high percentage (24.34%) of samples with colifecal values above standard limits is an indication of deficient sanitary conditions. These results suggest the need to provide legislation on the sanitary and hygienic quality of spices in our country.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anaerobe.2005.05.003DOI Listing
December 2005
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