Publications by authors named "Patricia R Messmer"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Standardizing the Bedside Report to Promote Nurse Accountability and Work Effectiveness.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2018 Oct;49(10):460-466

Background: This study evaluated bedside reporting from the nurse's perspective regarding accountability, empowerment, work effectiveness, satisfaction, and communication. The aim was to examine the effects of an educational learning activity on bedside handoff reporting related to accountability and work effectiveness. The communication was used at change of shift between frontline nurses, with future interprofessional implementation.

Method: A demographic questionnaire, the Specht and Ramler Accountability Index-Individual Referent and the Conditions for Workplace Effectiveness Questionnaire-II were administered pre-posteducational (learning activity) intervention. Of 184 RNs, 104 completed the pretest, with only 73 of those completing the posttest.

Results: Statistically significant differences were seen with empowerment, work effectiveness, communication, and nurse job satisfaction posttest; no statistically significant difference was found with accountability. The sample was ethnically diverse, with the majority being Latino pretest (n = 63, 55.8%) and posttest (n = 44, 60.3%).

Conclusion: For medical-surgical units, incorporating bedside reporting can increase nurse satisfaction, accountability, and positive outcomes. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(10):460-466.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20180918-06DOI Listing
October 2018

Knowledge and Competency of Nursing Faculty Regarding Evidence-Based Practice.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2016 Sep;47(9):409-19

The Institute of Medicine recommended that 90% of clinical decisions should be evidenced based by 2020. Both the IOM and the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses identified evidenced-based practice (EBP) as a core competency for practice. EBP can reduce costs, improve patient outcomes, and ensure optimal nursing interventions. Because nursing faculty may have deficits in knowledge, attitudes, and competencies to teach EBP, few nursing students conduct EBP reviews. The purpose of this project was to develop EBP educational resources to increase nursing faculty knowledge and competency of EBP in a southeastern college with both a multicultural faculty and student body. A pre- and postsurvey design using Stevens' ACE Star Model of Knowledge Transformation and Evidence Based Practice Readiness Inventory (ACE-ERI) determined the effectiveness of the educational intervention. Results indicated that faculty's self-confidence about their competency in EBP increased significantly from presurvey to postsurvey, t(17) = -2.04, p = .028, but there was no significant change from pretest to posttest, t(17) = -0.576, p =.572, for the EBP knowledge component of ACE-ERI. The results of the study suggest that educational programs for RN-to-BSN faculty are vital in increasing participant's readiness for EBP. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(9):409-419.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20160817-08DOI Listing
September 2016

Outcomes of an Immersion Proiect in the Dominican Republic Bateyes.

J Natl Black Nurses Assoc 2016 Jul;27(1):31-37

Faculty and nursing students from a southeastern college participated in a service-learning immersion in an intra-professional collaboration to treat migrant workers living in the bateyes (the name given to those communities that reside inside sugar plantations in the Dominican Republic that are comprised mainly of Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent) in the targeted Dominican Republic agricultural plantations. The mission team included physicians, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and nursing students These team members provided health assessment, screenings, and preventive health education to men, women, and children, and their families. The students were provided an in-depth orientation and briefed about what to expect during their visit to a foreign culture. Students were informed about local nursing care practices, beliefs of health-care practices, and the possibility of unexpected occurrences in the bateyes. The cultural and health issues of the Haitian migrant workers living in the bateyes were discussed prior to the trip, and upon arrival in the Dominican Republic. The immersion field experience had two primary aims, which included: 1. Exposing students to a field experience in another country that created avenues for developing a global perspective; and 2. Exposing students to methods of collecting and analyzing retrospective data to glean an understanding of the healthcare needs of individuals living in the Dominican Republic. The charts of 735 patients from the 1437 patients (51%) treated were analyzed with 49% not accounted for. Of those patients, 59% were females and 41% were males. The lower number of males in this retrospective study was probably due to restrictions of working with sugar cane; the males had difficulties leaving their work to be seen by the health-care professionals. The largest age group was the 12-21 age group (24%), with the next age groups 22-32 (18%), 6-11 (16%) and 33-43 (11%), 44-54(9%),0-5 (9%), 55-65 (7%), 66-76 (4%), and 77-87(2%). Many patients had multiple diagnoses in multiple diagnostic categories with the most frequent diagnosis, Gastrointestinal (24%), followed by Neurology (16%), Respiratory (14%), Genitourinary (11%), Musculoskeletal (10%), Dermatology (8%), Eyes, Ears, Nose & Throat (8%), Cardiology (7%), and Hematology (2%).
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July 2016

Six degrees of nursing science: message from the president.

Res Nurs Health 2015 Jun 28;38(3):180-2. Epub 2015 Apr 28.

SNRS Director of Membership (through February 2015), Miami Dade College, Miami, FL.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/nur.21656DOI Listing
June 2015

Inpatient falls in freestanding children's hospitals.

Pediatr Nurs 2014 May-Jun;40(3):127-35

Patient falls are considered a significant safety risk, but little evidence regarding the significance of falls in children is available. A multisite, observational study of fall events occurring in pediatric inpatients (younger than 18 years of age) from Child Health Corporation of America member hospitals was conducted to determine the prevalence and significance of falls. Fall prevalence was 0.84 per 1,000 patient days with 48% classified as preventable. Injuries occurred in 32%, but only two falls resulted in an increased length of stay; none resulted in permanent disability or death. Only 47% of the children who fell were identified to be at risk for fall. Alert mechanisms were used in 60% and preventive measures in 23%. These findings suggest that while inpatient pediatric fall rates are lower than those of adults, greater diligence in identification and risk reduction may further reduce the prevalence of falls and the proportion of fall-related injuries.
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September 2014

ANF scholars (1955-2012): stepping stones to a nursing research career.

Appl Nurs Res 2014 Feb 11;27(1):2-24. Epub 2013 Nov 11.

School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario.

The American Nurses Foundation (ANF) grant program has been successful in funding nurse researchers' initial research studies for nearly 60 years. (ANF, 2013). From 1955-2012, over 1,000 ANF scholars have been identified through this historical nursing research study. Over the years, obtaining an ANF grant has become increasingly competitive for scholars. The environment supportive of research is evident from the schools that are the top recipients of grants. The ANF has a proud legacy of scholars who have and continue to make contributions to the advancement of nursing science. The paths forged by the ANF scholars illustrate the significant role that small grant programs play in the evolvement of nursing research and the expansion of nursing science.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apnr.2013.10.009DOI Listing
February 2014

Miami Dade College faculty support their nursing faculty colleagues in Haiti.

Nurs Educ Perspect 2012 Jan-Feb;33(1):66

Miami Dade College, Miami, Florida, USA.

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April 2012

Unaccompanied hospitalized children: nurses' search for understanding.

J Holist Nurs 2012 Jun 24;30(2):117-26. Epub 2011 Oct 24.

University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2464 Charlotte Street, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

Purpose: To explore the experiences and feelings of pediatric nurses who care for hospitalized children that are unaccompanied by their parents.

Design And Methods: This phenomenological study consisted of interviews with 12 pediatric nurses. Verbatim transcriptions were reviewed with participants and analyzed.

Findings: Pediatric nurses viewed the circumstances of unaccompanied hospitalized children through the perspective of their own life-worlds. They used both cognitive and emotional constructs to describe the phenomenon. Nurses' perceptions were affected by day-to-day contingencies of their life worlds which come through the four dimensions of space, mind/body, time, and relationships. These perceptions affected their assessment of parents' situated contexts. Nurses' assessments could lead to negative judgments of parents because they worried about ill effects on the unaccompanied children. Meanwhile,nurses often perceived that parents demonstrated trust when they relegated their child's care to them.

Conclusions: Pediatric nurses dealt with increased emotional work while remaining compassionate with their patients. Nurses indicated that they needed to understand their own life-worlds and that parents' day-to-day contingencies may affect parents' ability to remain with their hospitalized children. Participants were aware of judgmental attitudes which could interfere with the development of therapeutic relationships with parents, and therefore, with hospitalized children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0898010111423422DOI Listing
June 2012

The case for specialized transport teams.

Am J Nurs 2011 Sep;111(9):11

Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NAJ.0000405038.47088.8bDOI Listing
September 2011

Perceived value of national certification for pediatric nurses.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2011 Sep 23;42(9):421-32. Epub 2011 May 23.

Miami Dade College, Miami, FL, USA.

Purpose: This study evaluated whether pediatric nurses who were certified valued national certifications to a greater degree than those who were not certified.

Methods: The Gaberson, Schroeter, Killen, and Valentine (2003) Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT) was used to measure nurses' perceptions of certification. The PVCT includes 18 certification-related value statements, using a five-point Likert scale response ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. A principal factor analysis was performed to identify clusters of related variables.

Results: Certified pediatric nurses valued national certifications to a greater degree than those who were not certified. More favorable views of certification were moderately associated with favorable views of the effects of certification on salary. The PVCT was found to have one factor, not two, as previously reported in the literature. Lower perceived relationships were reported between certification and salary, clinical competence, and consumer confidence compared with feelings of professionalism and personal satisfaction.

Conclusion: Efforts to improve the relationship between certification and its perceived value at one institution were addressed. More attention may be needed to strengthen relationships, perceived or otherwise, between certification and competency skills, public awareness, and compensation of nurses for holding national certification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20110516-01DOI Listing
September 2011

Support programs for new graduates in pediatric nursing.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2011 Apr;42(4):182-92

Nursing Education and Research, Miami Dade College, Miami, FL, USA.

This study examined intent to stay and the relationship between work satisfaction and burnout in a sample of new registered nurse graduates hired at a freestanding children's hospital. The following research questions were addressed: (1) Two years after initial employment, what is the percentage of new graduates who intend to stay on the job? (2) Is there a relationship between work satisfaction and burnout? (3) What is the turnover rate after the implementation of a support group program for new registered nurses? Of a target group of 75 new graduate nurses, 33 (44%) completed a modified version of Aiken's Revised Nursing Work Index and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. A majority of the registered nurses intended to stay on the job, with 87.9% reporting that they were satisfied with their current position and 97.0% reporting that they were satisfied with being a nurse. The correlation between job satisfaction and burnout was as follows: r = -0.684, F(1,30) = -21.71; p < .001. Of the participants, 39% reported an increase in the amount of time they spent with patients over the year, 27% reported an increase in the amount of time they spent documenting patient care, and 24% reported that the "quality of care" they were providing was better than 1 year ago. Before the implementation of a support group program for new graduates in 2006, the turnover rate was 7.6%; in 2009, the turnover rate was 5.7%.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20110324-05DOI Listing
April 2011

Hispanic parents' perspective on early PACU visitation.

J Perianesth Nurs 2010 Jun;25(3):152-61

Congenital Heart Institute, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA.

Many reports indicate that family member presence in the PACU may decrease anxiety levels in both patients and family members. PACUs, nevertheless, often restrict family visitation because of the close proximity to ORs, complexity, and the fast-paced recovery environment. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of parental presence on the anxiety levels of children ages 9 to 18, observed behavior of children ages 6 to 8, and reported parental anxiety in the pre- and postoperative periods. The quasi-experimental design used a sample of 72 parent-patient dyads, predominately Hispanic, who completed either the pediatric (9-12) or teenager/adult Speilberger State Anxiety forms. Forty (40) parents were placed in the PACU with their children, and 32 remained in the Waiting Room. PACU nurses coded observations of parents and observations of patients aged 6 to 8 years. FLACC or numeric pain scales scores were also collected. Results showed no difference in parental anxiety between those who were placed in the PACU or Waiting Room. Patients aged 13 to 18 with parents in-PACU had significantly lowered anxiety scores than patients with parents in-Waiting Room (t = 2.51, P = .02). Anxiety scores for younger children (9-12 years old) were not lowered postoperatively regardless of parent placement. Regardless of age, patients with parents in-PACU showed statistically significantly greater pain pre-operatively compared with patients with in-Waiting Room parents (t = 3.15, P = .002), but this difference disappeared postoperatively.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jopan.2010.03.006DOI Listing
June 2010

Racial differences in women's prodromal and acute symptoms of myocardial infarction.

Am J Crit Care 2010 Jan;19(1):63-73

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, 72205, USA.

Background: Minority women, especially black and Hispanic women, have higher rates of coronary heart disease and resulting disability and death than do white women. A lack of knowledge of minority women's symptoms of coronary heart disease may contribute to these disparities.

Objective: To compare black, Hispanic, and white women's prodromal and acute symptoms of myocardial infarction.

Methods: In total, 545 black, 539 white, and 186 Hispanic women without cognitive impairment at 15 sites were retrospectively surveyed by telephone after myocardial infarction. With general linear models and controls for cardiovascular risk factors, symptom severity and frequency were compared among racial groups. Logistic regression models were used to examine individual prodromal or acute symptoms by race, with adjustments for cardiovascular risk factors.

Results: Among the women, 96% reported prodromal symptoms. Unusual fatigue (73%) and sleep disturbance (50%) were the most frequent. Eighteen symptoms differed significantly by race (P<.01); blacks reported higher frequencies of 10 symptoms than did Hispanics or whites. Thirty-six percent reported prodromal chest discomfort; Hispanics reported more pain/discomfort symptoms than did black or white women. Minority women reported more acute symptoms (P < .01). The most frequent symptom, regardless of race, was shortness of breath (63%); 22 symptoms differed by race (P <.01). In total, 28% of Hispanic, 38% of black, and 42% of white women reported no chest pain/discomfort.

Conclusions: Prodromal and acute symptoms of myocardial infarction differed significantly according to race. Racial descriptions of women's prodromal and acute symptoms should assist providers in interpreting women's symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4037/ajcc2010372DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2860802PMC
January 2010

Magnetism and the nursing workforce.

Annu Rev Nurs Res 2010 ;28:233-52

School of Nursing Medical Center Campus, Miami Dade College, FL, USA.

The focus of this chapter is to highlight practice exemplars and research findings related to the five components of the new Magnet Model. A brief overview of the historical development and professional evolution of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program is presented followed by a brief overview of the original fourteen forces of magnetism. Content related to empirical practice-based research framed under the components of transformational leadership; structural empowerment; exemplary professional practice; new knowledge, innovation, and improvement; and empirical outcomes is presented and discussed. The authors provide key findings from scholarly publications and describe how the findings contribute to the creation of work environments based on the tenets of magnetism. The chapter concludes with a brief over of the ANCC Pathway to Excellence Program.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0739-6686.28.233DOI Listing
July 2011

Imogene M. King's scholars reflect on her wisdom and influence on nursing science.

Nurs Sci Q 2009 Apr;22(2):128-33

University of Wyoming, School of Nursing, Dept. 3065, 1000 E. University Ave., Laramie, Wyoming 82079, USA.

Reflections on the impact of the work of great leaders are vital for both scientists and practitioners to gain important perspectives on the progress of the evolution of the discipline. Recognizing the influence of a particular theorist's impact is particularly important at the time of death, which is the time where the development of a particular theory moves from the originator to the followers. This column serves as a tribute to Imogene M. King, and is dedicated to her wisdom in promoting the conceptual system she developed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894318409332568DOI Listing
April 2009

The Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale: a case-control study.

J Spec Pediatr Nurs 2009 Jan;14(1):22-32

Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess whether the Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale (HDFS) identifies hospitalized pediatric patients at high risk for falls.

Design And Methods: The study was a matched case-control design. A chart review of 153 pediatric cases who fell and 153 controls who did not fall were pair-matched by age, gender, and diagnosis.

Results: High-risk patients fell almost twice as often as low-risk patients (odds ratio 1.87, confidence interval = 1.01, 3.53, p = .03).

Practice Implications: A Falls Prevention Pediatric Program with the HDFS tool addresses the Joint Commission Patient Safety Goals, but further research is needed to examine HDFS sensitivity-specificity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6155.2008.00166.xDOI Listing
January 2009

Enhancing nurse-physician collaboration using pediatric simulation.

J Contin Educ Nurs 2008 Jul;39(7):319-27

Patient Care Services Research, Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the level of nurse-physician collaboration during simulation training.

Methods: A human patient simulator (HPS) of three mock codes with life-threatening scenarios in children, an understudied population, was used. A set of standardized measures and observational techniques were used to determine levels of nurse-physician collaboration and interaction on multiple dimensions found to improve patient outcomes.

Results: High levels of group cohesion (GC) and collaboration and satisfaction with patient care decisions (CSPCD) were identified among both physicians and nurses. The male respondents, regardless of discipline, had significantly higher GC scores (p = .029) and significantly higher CSPCD scores (p = .005) than the female respondents. Although the nurses and physicians self-reported good collaboration following the scenarios, analysis of the videotapes revealed that collaboration improved over time.

Conclusion: The results of this study hold promise for this critical area of science that seeks to improve the outcomes of patients who experience life-threatening events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20080701-07DOI Listing
July 2008

Imogene M. King over the years.

Nurs Sci Q 2007 Jul;20(3):198

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894318407303097DOI Listing
July 2007

Professional model of care: Using King's theory of goal attainment.

Nurs Sci Q 2006 Jul;19(3):227-9

Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, Florida, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0894318406289887DOI Listing
July 2006

A collaborative approach to expand clinical experiences and cultural awareness among undergraduate nursing students.

J Prof Nurs 2005 Jul-Aug;21(4):240-3

University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, PA 15261, USA.

Nurse educators are constantly seeking opportunities to expose undergraduate students to different cultures. This requirement is essential to prepare tomorrow's nursing professionals to practice culturally component care in diverse health care environments. This article describes a unique collaborative experience between the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing and the Miami Children's Hospital that offers senior baccalaureate students the opportunity to complete one term of clinical experience in a culturally diverse health care facility.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2005.06.001DOI Listing
October 2005

Nurses' job satisfaction, stress, and recognition in a pediatric setting setting.

Pediatr Nurs 2004 May-Jun;30(3):219-27

Mary E. Ernst, MSN, ARNP, is Director, CICU, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify a set of factors that describes nursing satisfaction in the pediatric setting.

Methods: An exploratory descriptive design was used. Surveys were distributed to all nurses employed at a children's hospital in the Southeast. The survey included: nursing satisfaction, organizational work satisfaction, job stress, and nurse recognition scales. Two hundred and forty-nine out of 534 pediatric nurses (46%) responded. Data were analyzed using factor analysis and correlation.

Findings: The results of this survey demonstrated that several factors predict pediatric nurses' job satisfaction and organizational work satisfaction. These factors include: pay, time to do the nursing care, confidence in one's ability, and task requirements. A relationship among nurses' job satisfaction, organizational work satisfaction, job stress, and recognition in the pediatric setting was also found. Nurses with more years of experience and longevity on the unit and at the hospital had more confidence, showed less concern about time demands, and were less concerned about pay and task requirements than younger nurses. Job stress correlated significantly and inversely with age, years as a nurse, and years in the organization. Older nurses were more satisfied with recognition they received than their younger counterparts.

Conclusions: The findings of this study support the need to focus on programs to increase the confidence of novice nurses, improve institutional nursing recognition for all levels, enhance communication at all levels of the organization, and maintain competitive compensation.
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September 2004

Enhancing knowledge and self-confidence of novice nurses: The "Shadow-A-Nurse" ICU program.

Nurs Educ Perspect 2004 May-Jun;25(3):131-6

Miami Children's Hospital, Florida, USA.

The nursing shortage in the United States has resulted in a need for newly graduated novice nurses to rapidly transition into the nursing workforce. Although some nursing schools provide clinical experience in the intensive care unit (ICU), many novice nurses are not confident about their skills in providing critical-care nursing. To assist novice nurses in rapidly transitioning into the ICU nurse role, an innovative internship program for novice nurses was designed and implemented. A pilot study was conducted to determine if working with experienced nurses in the ICU environment, in addition to formal education and skills training in critical-care nursing, enables novice nurses to effectively transition into the role of ICU nurse. Qualitative and quantitative results of the program after the second year are discussed.
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September 2004

March to Magnet.... one hospital's experience in achieving magnet status.

Reflect Nurs Leadersh 2003 Oct;29(4):14-5

Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, Fla., USA.

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October 2003

Highlighting the Eleanor Bindrim scholarship.

Fla Nurse 2002 Dec;50(4):15

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December 2002

Using nursing research projects to meet Magnet Recognition Program standards.

J Nurs Adm 2002 Oct;32(10):538-43

Mount Sinai Medical Center and the Miami Heart Institute, Miami Beach, FL, USA.

The American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Recognition Program recognizes facilities that demonstrate excellence in nursing services, development of a professional milieu and growth and development of the nursing staff. The Magnet program is based on the American Nurses Association's which serves as the evaluation framework for determination of Magnet recognition. The role of research and its impact on nursing practice is an important criterion. The authors describe how one medical center successfully used ongoing nursing research projects to highlight how the institution met the Magnet standards.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00005110-200210000-00009DOI Listing
October 2002

HIV-positive women and minority patients' satisfaction with inpatient hospital care.

AIDS Patient Care STDS 2002 Mar;16(3):127-34

School of Nursing, College of Health & Urban Affairs, Florida International University, Miami, Florida 33181, USA.

Although patient satisfaction has been examined in relation to HIV services for ambulatory and managed care, less is known about perceptions of hospital care, particularly for HIV-positive women and minorities. The purpose of this study was to examine HIV-positive women and minority patients' satisfaction with hospital care. The study was part of a larger funded study that explored potential health care disparities for HIV-positive women and minority persons in the era of HIV combination drug therapy. A convenience sample of 50 HIV-positive persons was recruited from four medical centers/hospitals in a South Florida community. The multi-ethnic sample included 31 women and 19 men. The survey tool used was Cleary's HIV-Infected Patient's In-Hospital Questionnaire. Findings revealed that participants were generally satisfied with their hospital care. Physicians, nurses, and the hospital environment received satisfactory ratings. However, several problem areas were identified, including pain management and education on side effects of HIV medications, indicating the need for interventions to improve care. Experimental AIDS drugs were discussed with less than half of the participants, suggesting that HIV-positive women and minority patients may not have equal access to clinical drug trials. Further research is also needed to determine whether attitudes conveyed by health care providers influence HIV-positive patients to be wary of advance directives. The competence of nurses experienced in acute-care nursing of persons with HIV/AIDS was an important factor in patient satisfaction. A lack of experienced acute-care AIDS nurses may ultimately lead to a decrease in HIV-positive patients' satisfaction with hospital care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/108729102317330472DOI Listing
March 2002