Publications by authors named "Patricia M Schwarz"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Structural transitions of the RING1B C-terminal region upon binding the polycomb cbox domain.

Biochemistry 2008 Aug 11;47(31):8007-15. Epub 2008 Jul 11.

Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, MSC 7760, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229-3900, USA.

Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required for maintaining cell identity and stem cell self-renewal. RING1B and Polycomb (Pc) are two components of a multiprotein complex called polycomb repression complex 1 (PRC1) that is essential for establishing and maintaining long-term repressed gene states. Here we characterize the interaction between the C-terminal region of RING1B (C-RING1B) and the Pc cbox domain. The C-RING1B-cbox interaction displays a 1:1 stoichiometry with dissociation constants ranging from 9.2 to 180 nM for the different Pc orthologues. NMR analysis of C-RING1B alone reveals line broadening. However, when it is in complex with the cbox domain, there is a striking change to the NMR spectrum indicative of conformational tightening. This conformational change may arise from the organization of the C-RING1B subdomains. The C-terminal regions of all PcG RING1 proteins are composed of two stretches of conserved sequences separated by a variable linker sequence. While the entire C-RING1B region is required for cbox binding, the N- and C-terminal halves of C-RING1B can be separated and are able to interact, suggesting the presence of an intramolecular interaction within C-RING1B. The flexibility within the C-RING1B structure allowing transitions between the intramolecular bound and unbound states may cause the broadened peaks of the C-RING1B NMR spectrum. Binding the cbox domain stabilizes C-RING1B, whereby broadening is eliminated. The presence of flexible regions could allow C-RING1B to bind a variety of different factors, ultimately recruiting RING1B and its associated PcG proteins to different genomic loci.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/bi800857fDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442619PMC
August 2008

Cooperative assembly of TGF-beta superfamily signaling complexes is mediated by two disparate mechanisms and distinct modes of receptor binding.

Mol Cell 2008 Feb;29(2):157-68

Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.

Dimeric ligands of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily signal across cell membranes in a distinctive manner by assembling heterotetrameric complexes of structurally related serine/threonine-kinase receptor pairs. Unlike complexes of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) branch that apparently form due to avidity from membrane localization, TGF-beta complexes assemble cooperatively through recruitment of the low-affinity (type I) receptor by the ligand-bound high-affinity (type II) pair. Here we report the crystal structure of TGF-beta3 in complex with the extracellular domains of both pairs of receptors, revealing that the type I docks and becomes tethered via unique extensions at a composite ligand-type II interface. Disrupting the receptor-receptor interactions conferred by these extensions abolishes assembly of the signaling complex and signal transduction (Smad activation). Although structurally similar, BMP and TGF-beta receptors bind in dramatically different modes, mediating graded and switch-like assembly mechanisms that may have coevolved with branch-specific groups of cytoplasmic effectors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2007.11.039DOI Listing
February 2008

Degradation of MEPE, DMP1, and release of SIBLING ASARM-peptides (minhibins): ASARM-peptide(s) are directly responsible for defective mineralization in HYP.

Endocrinology 2008 Apr 27;149(4):1757-72. Epub 2007 Dec 27.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, The Kidney Institute, Kansas University Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.

Mutations in PHEX (phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome) and DMP1 (dentin matrix protein 1) result in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (HYP) and autosomal-recessive hypophosphatemic-rickets (ARHR), respectively. Specific binding of PHEX to matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) regulates the release of small protease-resistant MEPE peptides [acidic serine- and aspartate-rich MEPE-associated motif (ASARM) peptides]. ASARM peptides are potent inhibitors of mineralization (minhibins) that also occur in DMP1 [MEPE-related small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoprotein (SIBLING) protein]. It is not known whether these peptides are directly responsible for the mineralization defect. We therefore used a bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) coculture model, ASARM peptides, anti-ASARM antibodies, and a small synthetic PHEX peptide (SPR4; 4.2 kDa) to examine this. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and two-dimensional (1)H/(15)N nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated specific binding of SPR4 peptide to ASARM peptide. When cultured individually for 21 d, HYP BMSCs displayed reduced mineralization compared with wild type (WT) (-87%, P < 0.05). When cocultured, both HYP and WT cells failed to mineralize. However, cocultures (HYP and WT) or monocultures of HYP BMSCs treated with SPR4 peptide or anti-ASARM neutralizing antibodies mineralized normally. WT BMSCs treated with ASARM peptide also failed to mineralize properly without SPR4 peptide or anti-ASARM neutralizing antibodies. ASARM peptide treatment decreased PHEX mRNA and protein (-80%, P < 0.05) and SPR4 peptide cotreatment reversed this by binding ASARM peptide. SPR4 peptide also reversed ASARM peptide-mediated changes in expression of key osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation genes. Western blots of HYP calvariae and BMSCs revealed massive degradation of both MEPE and DMP1 protein compared with the WT. We conclude that degradation of MEPE and DMP-1 and release of ASARM peptides are chiefly responsible for the HYP mineralization defect and changes in osteoblast-osteoclast differentiation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1210/en.2007-1205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2276704PMC
April 2008

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirms that MEPE binds to PHEX via the MEPE-ASARM motif: a model for impaired mineralization in X-linked rickets (HYP).

Bone 2005 Jan 24;36(1):33-46. Epub 2004 Nov 24.

Department of Periodontics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA.

Matrix Extracellular Phospho-glycoprotEin (MEPE) and proteases are elevated and PHEX is defective in HYP. PHEX prevents proteolysis of MEPE and release of a protease-resistant MEPE-ASARM peptide, an inhibitor of mineralization (minhibin). Thus, in HYP, mutated PHEX may contribute to increased ASARM peptide release. Moreover, binding of MEPE by PHEX may regulate this process in normal subjects. The nature of the PHEX-MEPE nonproteolytic interaction(s) (direct or indirect) is/are unknown. Our aims were to determine (1) whether PHEX binds specifically to MEPE, (2) whether the binding involves the ASARM motif region, and (3) whether free ASARM peptide affects mineralization in vivo in mice. Protein interactions between MEPE and recombinant soluble PHEX (secPHEX) were measured using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Briefly, secPHEX, MEPE, and control protein (IgG) were immobilized on a Biacore CM5 sensor chip, and SPR experiments were performed on a Biacore 3000 high-performance research system. Pure secPHEX was then injected at different concentrations, and interactions with immobilized proteins were measured. To determine MEPE sequences interacting with secPHEX, the inhibitory effects of MEPE-ASARM peptides (phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated), control peptides, and MEPE midregion RGD peptides on secPHEX binding to chip-immobilized MEPE were measured. ASARM peptide and etidronate-mediated mineralization inhibition in vivo and in vitro were determined by quenched calcein fluorescence in hind limbs and calvariae in mice and by histological Sanderson stain. A specific, dose-dependent and Zn-dependent protein interaction between secPHEX and immobilized MEPE occurs (EC50 of 553 nM). Synthetic MEPE PO4-ASARM peptide inhibits the PHEX-MEPE interaction (K(D(app)) = 15 uM and B(max/inhib) = 68%). In contrast, control and MEPE-RGD peptides had no effect. Subcutaneous administration of ASARM peptide resulted in marked quenching of fluorescence in calvariae and hind limbs relative to vehicle controls indicating impaired mineralization. Similar results were obtained with etidronate. Sanderson-stained calvariae also indicated a marked increase in unmineralized osteoid with ASARM peptide and etidronate groups. We conclude that PHEX and MEPE form a nonproteolytic protein interaction via the MEPE carboxy-terminal ASARM motif, and the ASARM peptide inhibits mineralization in vivo. The binding of MEPE and ASARM peptide by PHEX may explain why loss of functional osteoblast-expressed PHEX results in defective mineralization in HYP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2004.09.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3361744PMC
January 2005