Publications by authors named "Patricia G Anderson"

20 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Degenerative Cervical Spine: Changes after Anterior Decompression and Cage Fusion.

Global Spine J 2016 Nov 23;6(7):673-678. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Department of Orthopedics, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

 A prospective cohort study.  Decompression and fusion of cervical vertebrae is a combined procedure that has a high success rate in relieving radicular symptoms and stabilizing or improving cervical myelopathy. However, fusion may lead to increased motion of the adjacent vertebrae and cervical deformity. Both have been postulated to lead to adjacent segment pathology (ASP). Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly used to evaluate range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine and ASP. Our objective was to measure ASP, cervical curvature, and ROM of individual segments of the cervical spine using kinematic MRI before and 24 months after monosegmental cage fusion.  Eighteen patients who had single-level interbody fusion were included. ROM (using kinematic MRI) and degeneration, spinal stenosis, and cervical curvature were measured preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively.  Using kinematic MRI, segmental motion of the cervical segments was measured with a precision of less than 3 degrees. The cervical fusion did not affect the ROM of adjacent levels. However, pre- and postoperative ROM was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to the fusion level compared with those further away. In addition, at 24 months postoperatively, the number of cases with ASP was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to fusion level.  Using kinematic MRI, ROM after spinal fusion can be measured with high precision. Kinematic MRI can be used not only in clinical practice, but also to study intervention and its effect on postoperative biomechanics and ASP of cervical vertebrae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0036-1579551DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5077714PMC
November 2016

Effect of the combination of music and nature sounds on pain and anxiety in cardiac surgical patients: a randomized study.

Altern Ther Health Med 2011 Jul-Aug;17(4):16-23

Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Background: Postoperative pain and anxiety are common in cardiac surgery patients. Studies have suggested that music can decrease anxiety in hospitalized patients. Primary Study Objective This study focused on the efficacy and feasibility of special music, which included nature sounds, for pain and anxiety.

Methods/design: In this randomized controlled trial, postoperative cardiovascular surgery patients were randomly assigned to a music group to receive 20 minutes of standard postoperative care and music twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4 or to a control group to receive 20 minutes of standard care with a quiet resting period twice daily on postoperative days 2 through 4.

Setting: Cardiovascular surgical unit of Saint Marys Hospital, Rochester, Minnesota.

Participants: One hundred patients completed the study (music group, n = 49; control group, n = 51). Intervention The music was delivered through CD players in the patients' rooms.

Primary Outcome Measures: Pain, anxiety, satisfaction, and relaxation were evaluated from visual analog scales.

Results: Data showed a significant decrease in mean (SD) pain scores after the second session of day 2 for the music group (change, ?1.4 [1.4]) compared with the control group (change, ?0.4 [1.4]) (P = .001). Mean relaxation scores improved more at the first session of day 2 for the music group (change, 1.9 [2.7]) compared with the control group (change, 0.3 [2.9]) (P = .03). The music group also showed lower anxiety and increased satisfaction overall, but these differences were not statistically significant. No major barriers to using the therapy were identified.

Conclusion: Recorded music and nature sounds can be integrated into the postoperative care of cardiovascular surgery patients. The recordings may provide an additional means for addressing common symptoms of pain and anxiety while providing a means of relaxation for these patients.
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May 2012

A clinical classification system for rheumatoid forefoot deformity.

Foot Ankle Surg 2011 Sep 5;17(3):158-65. Epub 2011 Feb 5.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical Center Leeuwarden, The Netherlands.

Background And Purpose: In the present study a classification system for the rheumatoid forefoot is reported with its intra- and interobserver reliability and clinical relevance. The classification is based on the sequence of anatomical changes resulting from the loss of integrity of the MTP joints, loss of motion and changes regarding the quality and position of the plantar soft tissues. It is hypothesized that with progression of the amount of deformity of the MTP joint(s), patients have more pain and functional loss.

Patients And Methods: In total 94 patients were included in the study following precise inclusion criteria. The forefeet of the patients were classified according to the introduced classification system by two observers in order to determine the intra- and interobserver reliability. The relation of the suggested classification between pain, function scores, and plantar foot pressure measurements was examined.

Results And Conclusion: According to the Cohen's kappa and the ICC, the intra- and inter-observer reliability were high. Despite the large variation between subjects in a certain grade, a clear trend was found between increase in classification and VAS for pain, FFI difficulty with activities, and plantar peak pressure under the metatarsals. The suggested classification is of clinical relevance and can be used to develop therapeutical algorithms and to test interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fas.2010.05.001DOI Listing
September 2011

The Pirate group intervention protocol: description and a case report of a modified constraint-induced movement therapy combined with bimanual training for young children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy.

Occup Ther Int 2012 Jun 12;19(2):76-87. Epub 2011 Jul 12.

Sint Maartenskliniek, Department of Pediatric Rehabilitation, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The purpose of this article was to describe a child-friendly modified constraint-induced movement therapy protocol that is combined with goal-directed task-specific bimanual training (mCIMT-BiT). This detailed description elucidates the approach and supports various research reports. This protocol is used in a Pirate play group setting and aims to extend bimanual skills in play and self-care activities for children with cerebral palsy and unilateral spastic paresis of the upper limb. To illustrate the content and course of treatment and its effect, a case report of a two-year-old boy is presented. After the eight-week mCIMT-BiT intervention, the child improved the capacity of his affected arm and hand in both quantitative and qualitative terms and his bimanual performance in daily life as assessed by the Assisting Hand Assessment, ABILHAND-Kids, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts Module Determine Developmental Disregard, Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and Goal Attainment Scaling. It is argued that improvement of affected upper-limb capacity in a test situation may be achieved and retained relatively easily, but it may take a lot more training to stabilize the results and automate motor control of the upper limb. Future studies with groups of children should elaborate on these intensity and generalization issues.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oti.321DOI Listing
June 2012

Systematic review of anterior interbody fusion techniques for single- and double-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2011 Jun;36(14):E950-60

Department of Neurosurgery, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Study Design: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

Objective: To determine which technique of anterior cervical interbody fusion (ACIF) gives the best outcome in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease.

Summary Of Background Data: The number of surgical techniques for decompression and ACIF as treatment for cervical degenerative disc disease has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear.

Methods: From a comprehensive search, we selected randomized studies that compared anterior cervical decompression and ACIF techniques, in patients with chronic single- or double-level degenerative disc disease or disc herniation. Risk of bias was assessed using the criteria of the Cochrane back review group.

Results: Thirty-three studies with 2267 patients were included. The major treatments were discectomy alone and addition of an ACIF procedure (graft, cement, cage, and plates). At best, there was very low-quality evidence of little or no difference in pain relief between the techniques. We found moderate quality evidence for few secondary outcomes. Odom's criteria were not different between iliac crest autograft and a metal cage (risk ratio [RR]: 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.99-1.24). Bone graft produced more fusion than discectomy (RR: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.17-0.48). Complication rates were not different between discectomy and iliac crest autograft (RR: 1.56; 95% CI: 0.71-3.43). Low-quality evidence was found that iliac crest autograft results in better fusion than a cage (RR: 1.87; 95% CI: 1.10-3.17); but more complications (RR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.12-0.92).

Conclusion: When fusion of the motion segment is considered to be the working mechanism for pain relief and functional improvement, iliac crest autograft appears to be the golden standard. When ignoring fusion rates and looking at complication rates, a cage as a golden standard has a weak evidence base over iliac crest autograft, but not over discectomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BRS.0b013e31821cbba5DOI Listing
June 2011

Single or double-level anterior interbody fusion techniques for cervical degenerative disc disease.

Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011 Jan 19(1):CD004958. Epub 2011 Jan 19.

Department of Neurosurgery, Leiden University Medical Center, PO Box 9600, Leiden, Netherlands, 2300 RC.

Background: The number of surgical techniques for decompression and solid interbody fusion as treatment for cervical spondylosis has increased rapidly, but the rationale for the choice between different techniques remains unclear.

Objectives: To determine which technique of anterior interbody fusion gives the best clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with single- or double-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine.

Search Strategy: We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 1), MEDLINE (1966 to May 2009), EMBASE (1980 to May 2009), BIOSIS (2004 to May 2009), and references of selected articles.

Selection Criteria: Randomised comparative studies that compared anterior cervical decompression and interbody fusion techniques for participants with chronic degenerative disc disease.

Data Collection And Analysis: Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria. Data on demographics, intervention details and outcome measures were extracted onto a pre-tested data extraction form.

Main Results: Thirty-three small studies ( 2267 patients) compared different fusion techniques. The major treatments were discectomy alone, addition of an interbody fusion procedure (autograft, allograft, cement, or cage), and addition of anterior plates. Eight studies had a low risk of bias. Few studies reported on pain, therefore, at best, there was very low quality evidence of little or no difference in pain relief between the different techniques. We found moderate quality evidence for these secondary outcomes: no statistically significant difference in Odom's criteria between iliac crest autograft and a metal cage (6 studies, RR 1.11 (95% CI 0.99 to1.24)); bone graft produced more effective fusion than discectomy alone (5 studies, RR 0.22 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.48)); no statistically significant difference in complication rates between discectomy alone and iliac crest autograft (7 studies, RR 1.56 (95% CI 0.71 to 3.43)); and low quality evidence that iliac crest autograft results in better fusion than a cage (5 studies, RR 1.87 (95% CI 1.10 to 3.17)); but more complications (7 studies, RR 0.33 (95% CI 0.12 to 0.92)).

Authors' Conclusions: When the working mechanism for pain relief and functional improvement is fusion of the motion segment, there is low quality evidence that iliac crest autograft appears to be the better technique. When ignoring fusion rates and looking at complication rates, a cage has a weak evidence base over iliac crest autograft, but not over discectomy alone. Future research should compare additional instrumentation such as screws, plates, and cages against discectomy with or without autograft.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD004958.pub2DOI Listing
January 2011

A pilot study of the Video Observations Aarts and Aarts (VOAA): a new software program to measure motor behaviour in children with cerebral palsy.

Occup Ther Int 2007 ;14(2):113-22

Department of Child Rehabilitation, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

A new computer software program to score video observations, Video Observations Aarts and Aarts (VOAA) was developed to evaluate paediatric occupational therapy interventions. The VOAA is an observation tool that assesses the frequency, duration and quality of arm/hand use in children, in particular those with cerebral palsy. Reliability studies show that the first module, designed to evaluate a forced-use programme, has an excellent content validity index (0.93) and good intra- and inter-observer reliability (Cohen's kappas ranging from 0.62 to 0.85 for the three activities tested). With the built-in statistical package, paediatric occupational therapy departments can conduct therapeutic evaluations with children with impairments in the upper extremities. Further research is recommended to apply the VOAA in clinical studies in paediatric occupational therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oti.229DOI Listing
July 2007

Massage therapy: a comfort intervention for cardiac surgery patients.

Clin Nurse Spec 2007 May-Jun;21(3):161-5; quiz 166-7

Thoracic/Vascular Intensive Care Unit, St. Mary's Hospital-Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Integrative therapies have gained support in the literature as a method to control pain and anxiety. Many institutions have integrated massage therapy into their programs. Few studies have looked at the specific benefits of massage therapy for cardiac surgical patients. These patients undergo long surgical procedures and often complain of back, shoulder, and neck pain or general stress and tension. Clinical nurse specialist identify the benefits for patients and bring the evidence on massage therapy to the clinical setting. This article will provide an overview of the benefits of massage in the reduction of pain, anxiety, and tension in cardiac surgical patients. Reports of benefits seen with integration of massage in 1 cardiac surgical unit as part of evidence-based practice initiative for management of pain will be described. A clinical case example of a patient who has experienced cardiac surgery and received massage therapy will be shared.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.NUR.0000270014.97457.d5DOI Listing
July 2007

Provocative discography and lumbar fusion: is preoperative assessment of adjacent discs useful?

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2007 May;32(10):1094-9; discussion 1100

Institute for Spine Surgery and Applied Research, Sint Maartenskliniek, The Netherlands.

Study Design: A cohort study of clinical outcomes of lumbar fusion patients with preoperative assessment of adjacent levels by provocative discography.

Objective: To evaluate whether the preoperative status of the adjacent discs, as determined by provocative discography, has an impact on the clinical outcome of lumbar fusion in chronic low back pain (LBP) patients.

Summary Of Background Data: The results of lumbar fusion in chronic LBP patients vary considerably and are hard to predict. It is believed that degenerative levels adjacent to a fused spinal segment may be a cause of continuing pain. In this respect, it is important to know whether preoperative degenerative or symptomatic adjacent levels have an adverse effect on patient outcomes after lumbar fusion.

Methods: In 197 patients with an equivocal indication for lumbar fusion (two thirds were patients with prior spine surgery), the decision for either lumbar fusion or conservative management was determined by a temporary external transpedicular fixation trial. During the diagnostic workup, all patients had undergone provocative discography that included the assessment of the discs adjacent to the intended fusion levels. The individual changes in pain on a visual analog scale, assessed before treatment and at follow-up, and patient satisfaction were the measures of outcome.

Results: In the 82 patients who underwent a lumbar fusion, no difference in outcome was found between those patients with degenerative or symptomatic discs adjacent to the fusion and those with normal adjacent discs.

Conclusion: In this cohort study of chronic LBP patients with an uncertain indication for lumbar fusion, the preoperative status of adjacent levels as assessed by provocative discography did not appear to be related to the clinical outcome after fusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000261672.97430.b0DOI Listing
May 2007

Sonography after total hip replacement: reproducibility and normal values in 47 clinically uncomplicated cases.

Acta Orthop 2007 Feb;78(1):81-5

Department of Orthopaedics, Sint Maartenskliniek, PO Box 9011, Nijmegen, GM NL-6500, The Netherlands.

Background And Purpose: Interpretation of sonographic data is difficult when hematoma after total hip replacement is suspected, as there are no normative data. We describe the normal sonographic image, focusing on the amount and location of postoperative fluid collections after a clinically uncomplicated, primary total hip replacement by the posterior approach. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility is also considered.

Patients And Methods: We performed sonography of the hip in 47 patients between the second and the fifth postoperative day. Bone-to-capsule distance and deep and superficial extraarticular fluid collections were measured. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated.

Results: The normal values of bone-to-capsule distance and amount of extraarticular fluid after total hip replacement were established from the upper bound of the 95% confidence interval. The upper bound for bone-capsule distance was 6 mm, for deep fluid collections 21 mm, and for superficial fluid collections 28 mm. In this clinically normal patient group, 4 patients had an extreme value (< 3 SD) for bone-to-capsule distance. For the deep and superficial fluid collections, no extremes were found. No correlation was found between bone-to-capsule distance and whether or not there was extraarticular fluid. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.98 for bone-to-capsule distance and 0.99 for fluid collection measurements.

Interpretation: Sonography is a reproducible method for the evaluation of fluid collections after total hip replacement. The values measured can be helpful in decision making when there is clinical suspicion of postoperative hematoma after hip replacement by the posterior approach.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17453670610013457DOI Listing
February 2007

A new CT scan method for measuring the tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance in patellar instability.

Knee 2007 Mar 19;14(2):128-32. Epub 2006 Dec 19.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sint Maartenskliniek Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Patellar malalignment leading to objective or potential patella instability can be caused by tibial tuberosity lateralisation. This can be treated with a tuberosity medialisation. CT scan measurements are needed to assess the tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance. When using the previously described methods to determine this distance it can be difficult to determine the anatomical structures on the maximum intensity projection images, and this can lead to measurement error. This study was designed to compare the reliability of a new computer based CT measurement to the previously described method to determine the tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance. For each method, four observers measured each of 50 knees twice. The inter- and intra-observer variability for the conventional method and a new method were determined. Using the conventional method, the number of knees for which the difference between the aggregate mean of all eight measurements and the mean of duplicate measurements per observer greater than 2 mm varied among the observers between 7 and 24 for the 50 knees, while this variation between four and seven for the same 50 knees using the new method. The limits of reproducibility based on measurements from the four different observers improved by 25%, indicating that the measurement error is considerably smaller with the new method. We advise using this more accurate method to improve the selection of patients for a tuberosity medialisation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2006.11.003DOI Listing
March 2007

Conventional radiography cannot replace CT scanning in detecting tibial tubercle lateralisation.

Knee 2007 Jan 1;14(1):51-4. Epub 2006 Dec 1.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Patellar instability can be caused by an excessive lateral distance between the anterior tibial tubercle and the trochlear groove (TT-TG). This study was designed to compare the TT-TG in reformatted computed tomography to the TT-TG on a 30 degrees axial conventional radiograph (CR) using lead markers to visualize the tibial tubercle and epicondyles. This is the first report on the use of lead markers for determining the TT-TG. Seven symptomatic knees in five patients (mean age 25 years, standard deviation 8.0 years) were investigated. Results showed that the tibial tubercle could be detected on 30 degrees axial CR by a lead marker. Determining the TT-TG however proved to be difficult. A good intra- and interobserver reliability (ICC >0.86) but large measurement error for the axial CR compared to CT was measured (Limits of Reproducibility as quantification of the measurement error was 18 mm for axial CR and 4 mm for CT). Because of the large measurement error for axial CR, the study was terminated after seven symptomatic knees. Positioning of the patient and markers, especially the tibial tubercle marker, probably are important factors leading to the large measurement error. Therefore, axial CR cannot replace CT to detect a pathological tubercle trochlear groove distance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2006.10.009DOI Listing
January 2007

The value of a pantaloon cast test in surgical decision making for chronic low back pain patients: a systematic review of the literature supplemented with a prospective cohort study.

Eur Spine J 2006 Oct 17;15(10):1487-94. Epub 2006 May 17.

Department of Orthopedics, Institute for Spine Surgery and Applied Research (ISSAR), Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The results of lumbar fusion in chronic low back pain (LBP) patients vary considerably, and there is a need for proper patient selection. Lumbosacral orthoses have been widely used to predict outcome, however, with little scientific support. The aim of the present study was to determine the value of a pantaloon cast test in selecting chronic LBP patients for lumbar fusion or conservative management. First, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in which two independent reviewers identified studies in Medline, Cochrane and Current Contents databases. Three papers met the selection criteria. In the only study with a control group, a significantly better outcome after fusion compared to conservative treatment was found in patients who reported significant pain relief while in a cast (i.e. a positive cast test). The results of lumbar fusion, however, were not significantly different for patients with a positive and those with a negative cast test. In addition to the review, a clinical cohort study of 257 LBP patients, who had been allocated to either lumbar fusion or conservative management by a temporary external transpedicular fixation trial, was performed. Prior to allocation, all had undergone a pantaloon cast test. Patients with no history of prior spine surgery and with a positive pantaloon cast test had a better outcome after lumbar fusion than those treated conservatively (P = 0.002, chi (2 )test). In patients with previous spine operations the outcomes were poor and the test was of no value. From the literature and the present patient cohort, it was concluded that only in chronic LBP patients without prior spine surgery, a pantaloon cast test with substantial pain relief suggests a favorable outcome of lumbar fusion compared to conservative management. The test has no value in patients who have had previous spine surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00586-006-0121-0DOI Listing
October 2006

Temporary external transpedicular fixation of the lumbosacral spine: a prospective, longitudinal study in 330 patients.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2005 Dec;30(24):2813-6

Department of Orthopaedics, Sinit Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Study Design: In this study, 330 patients with incapacitating low back pain underwent temporary external transpedicular fixation (TETF) of the lumbosacral spine in a prospective trial.

Objective: To evaluate TETF as a test for selecting suitable candidates for segmental spinal fusion.

Summary Of Background Data: Few studies regarding TETF have been published, and contradictory results concerning predictive value and morbidity were reported.

Methods: All patients were tested with the external fixator in two different positions: fixation and nonfixation. Before and during the test and at follow-up examination, pain was assessed on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The TETF test was considered to be positive if the VAS score in the fixation state was 30 or more points lower than in the nonfixation state. Hence, a positive test would imply the decision to perform segmental lumbosacral fusion. When the reduction was less than 30 points, the test was negative. Individual pain reduction and working capacity were taken as measure of outcome.

Results: Most of the patients in this study (62%) underwent spinal surgery previously. The positive and negative TETF groups were quite similar, but a large within-group variation was found. Within the fusion group of 123 patients, improvement in VAS scores and improvement in working capacity were not significantly better for the positive TETF group in comparison with the negative TETF group.

Conclusion: In this heterogeneous group of chronic patients with low back pain, TETF of the spine (including a placebo trial) does not appear to be of value in selecting suitable candidates for spinal fusion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000190868.57106.4dDOI Listing
December 2005

Anterior cervical interbody fusion with a titanium box cage: early radiological assessment of fusion and subsidence.

Spine J 2005 Nov-Dec;5(6):645-9; discussion 649

Institute of Spinal Surgery and Applied Research, Sint Maartenskliniek, Hengstdal 3, 6522 JV Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Background Context: The use of stand-alone cervical interbody cages in anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) has become popular, but high subsidence rates have been reported in the literature.

Purpose: The authors present short-term radiological results of a titanium box cage with regard to fusion and subsidence. Reliable fusion and lack of subsidence may influence long-term clinical results. Early radiological data are necessary before implementation of this device on a larger scale can be accepted.

Study Design/setting: Retrospective radiological quality assessment study.

Patient Sample: ACDF using the titanium cage was performed in 71 consecutive patients at 106 levels. Diagnoses included cervical disc disease (57) and cervical spinal stenosis (14) after failed conservative treatment.

Outcome Measures: Subsidence and kyphosis were assessed on lateral cervical radiographs made directly postoperative and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, lateral flexion-extension radiographs were made to assess fusion.

Methods: Subsidence of the cage was defined as a decrease in total vertical height of the two fused vertebral bodies as measured on the lateral cervical radiographs made 3 and 6 months postoperatively compared with the directly postoperative radiographs. Segmental kyphosis was measured as the angle between the posterior borders of the two vertebral bodies on the lateral radiograph.

Results: No patients were lost to follow-up. Fusion was achieved after 6 months in all patients. At 3 and 6 months postoperative the same 10 cages (each in a different patient) had subsided. The C6-C7 level was significantly more frequently involved compared with all other levels. A segmental kyphotic alignment was observed in five patients at the C6-C7 level and in one patient at the C4-C5 level.

Conclusions: For patients with cervical disc disease, the high subsidence tendency of the cage into the end plate of predominantly C7 is a disturbing phenomenon found in this study. A modified cage design that improves and extends contact with the inferior surface could be expected to reduce subsidence into C7.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.spinee.2005.07.007DOI Listing
February 2006

Ten to twelve-year results with the Zweymüller cementless total hip prosthesis.

J Arthroplasty 2005 Apr;20(3):362-8

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Gooi-Noord, 1251 CH Laren (NH), The Netherlands.

Between January 1987 and December 1990, 221 Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasties were performed in 211 patients with idiopathic osteoarthritis. A total of 136 patients (142 prostheses) were evaluated at a mean follow-up of 134 months (SD 9.5). The study group consisted of 78 Hochgezogen and 64 Stepless stem prostheses, all with a threaded titanium cup and ceramic head. No clinical and radiological differences were found between the 2 stem prostheses. Seven cups had been revised because of aseptic loosening; 17 cups showed radiolucent lines, osteolysis, or migration. Mean linear polyethylene wear of 105 (74%) cups was 0.46 mm (SD 0.27), with an annual wear of 0.04 mm (SD 0.02). Wear did not correlate with pain, cup migration, radiolucent lines, or osteolysis. Cumulative survival was 96%. Zweymüller cementless total hip arthroplasty showed good midterm results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arth.2004.11.017DOI Listing
April 2005

Spinal osteotomy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: complications during first postoperative year.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2005 Jan;30(1):101-7

Institute for Spine Surgery and Applied Research, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Study Design: A historic cohort to determine short-term complications after 115 corrective osteotomies of the cervical and lumbar spine in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

Objectives: To describe the nature of complications of spinal osteotomies and sequelae.

Summary Of Background Data: Little is known about the rate and nature of complications after spinal osteotomy in these patients.

Methods: A chart review of 106 patients (age, 21-82 years) was conducted. The following surgical techniques were performed: cervical-thoracic extending osteotomy at C6-Th1 (n = 22), lumbar closing-wedge osteotomy (n = 62), polysegmental lumbar osteotomy (n = 20), or a combined anterior-posterior lumbar correction (n = 11).

Results: Many complications (7.8% permanent neurologic deficit, 9.6% deep wound infections, and 10.4% major general complications) occurred after performing a spinal correction. Since 1998, there is a tendency for a lower rate of infections but a higher rate of neurologic and major general complications. Because of 27% deep wound infections and 18% major general complications, the technique of combined anterior and posterior surgery has been abandoned.

Conclusion: High complication rates in this group of patients are partly due to the difficult surgery but also to the underlying disease. The surgery should be concentrated in specialized centers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-200501010-00018DOI Listing
January 2005

Tricalcium phosphate granules or rigid wedge preforms in open wedge high tibial osteotomy: a radiological study with a new evaluation system.

Knee 2004 Dec;11(6):451-6

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Limb Deformity Reconstruction Unit, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The capacity of two forms of porous beta-tricalcium phosphate bone substitutes (TCP) to promote bone healing in open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) was studied. We reviewed the X-rays of 27 osteotomies, with either TCP wedges or TCP granules as filling material, to compare the bone healing rates and bone remodelling, at specific postoperative intervals. A new radiologic rating system for OWHTO was created and tested for clinical applicability. All osteotomies healed uneventfully and complete resorption of TCP was demonstrated at 1 year postoperative in 85% (n = 23) of the procedures. In 44% (n = 10) of these 23 procedures, the osteotomy site was no longer visible. No difference in bone healing rate and bone remodelling was found when comparing the use of granules to a wedge, and no adverse effects of TCP were observed. The good inter- (k = 0.7) and intraobserver (k = 0.6) reliability of the new radiologic rating system enables clinical use. Good bone healing was found in OWHTO with both wedges and granules of TCP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.knee.2004.08.004DOI Listing
December 2004

Scheuermann kyphosis: the importance of tight hamstrings in the surgical correction.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2003 Oct;28(19):2252-9

Department of Orthopedics, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Study Design: A historic cohort study of the sagittal alignment in 33 consecutive patients with surgically corrected thoracic Scheuermann kyphosis.

Objectives: To determine if postsurgical imbalance, sagittal malalignment, and decreased lumbar-pelvic range of motion in patients with thoracic Scheuermann kyphosis is related to tight hamstrings.

Summary Of Background Data: Tight hamstrings are a frequent sign in Scheuermann kyphosis. The importance of tight hamstrings in the surgical management of Scheuermann kyphosis has not yet been studied.

Methods: Thirty-three patients with Scheuermann kyphosis were managed by surgical correction and fusion. Tight hamstrings, lumbar-pelvic range of motion, and sagittal balance were evaluated. Sixteen patients had tight hamstrings, and 17 patients had nontight hamstrings. Hamstrings were considered tight if the popliteal angle was >30 degrees.

Results: Patients with tight hamstrings have a significantly greater risk of postoperative imbalance (P = 0.05), and these patients can only compensate for this risk by reducing their lumbar lordosis (P = 0.0227). Furthermore, the limitations in the lumbar and pelvic range of motion are predicted by tight hamstrings (P
Conclusion: Tight hamstrings can be considered as an important factor in the surgical management of thoracic Scheuermann kyphosis. Tight hamstring patients can be classified as "lumbar compensators" and as such are prone to overcorrection and imbalance. Preoperative assessment of the lumbar-pelvic range of motion and tight hamstrings should therefore be advised. Extensive fusion of the lumbar segments might compromise the lumbar compensation mechanism and induces further risk of imbalance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.BRS.0000085097.63326.95DOI Listing
October 2003

Analysis of the sagittal plane after surgical management for Scheuermann's disease: a view on overcorrection and the use of an anterior release.

Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2002 Jan;27(2):167-75

Department of Orthopedics, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Study Design: A historic cohort study was conducted to investigate surgical correction and sagittal alignment in 33 patients with thoracic Scheuermann's disease.

Objective: To evaluate kyphosis correction, correction loss, sagittal balance, and the effect of an anterior release.

Summary Of Background Data: Currently, both posterior and anteroposterior techniques seem to produce impressive corrections for Scheuermann's disease. However, few reports have been made on sagittal malalignment after surgery.

Methods: A cohort of 33 patients who had undergone surgery for their Scheuermann's kyphosis were reviewed: Group A: posterior technique (n = 16), Group B: anteroposterior technique (n = 17). Pre- and postoperative curve morphometry (Cobb, Ferguson, Voutsinas), balance (C7 plumb line), and Oswestry score were compared.

Results: The mean follow-up period was 4.5 +/- 2 years (range, 2-8.2 years). The mean preoperative kyphosis (Cobb) was 78.7 degrees +/- 8.9 degrees, and the mean postoperative kyphosis was 51.7 degrees +/- 10.3 degrees. At follow-up evaluation, the correction loss was 1,4 degrees +/- 3.9 degrees. There was no difference in curve morphometry, correction, sagittal balance, average age, and follow-up period between Groups A and B. One junctional kyphosis, in Group B, was noted. After surgery, all the patients were satisfied, and the Oswestry score showed significant improvement. No neurologic complications were observed.

Conclusions: Good follow-up results included a 100% follow-up rate, adequate corrections, little correction loss, lower Oswestry scores, and a high satisfaction rate in both groups. The anteroposterior treatment did not influence the curve morphometry more than posterior fusion only. In reducing postoperative sagittal malalignment, the authors believe that surgical management should aim at a correction within the high normal kyphosis range of 40 degrees to 50 degrees, consequently providing good results and, particularly in flexible adolescents and young adults, minimizing the necessity for an anterior release.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00007632-200201150-00009DOI Listing
January 2002
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