Publications by authors named "Patricia F Adams"

22 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Health of Hispanic Adults: United States, 2010-2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2016 Jun(251):1-8

Key Findings: Data from the National Health Interview Survey, 2010-2014 •Overall, Puerto Rican adults consistently reported poorer health status than non-Hispanic adults. •Puerto Rican (19.2%) and Mexican (17.4%) adults were more likely than Central or South American (12.3%) and Cuban (14.7%) adults to be in fair or poor health. •Puerto Rican adults (27.3%) were more likely than Central or South American adults (16.6%) to have had multiple chronic conditions. •Puerto Rican adults (6.2%) were nearly twice as likely to report serious psychological distress in the past 30 days compared with Central or South American adults (3.3%). •Puerto Rican adults (11.4%) were more likely than Central or South American (2.9%), Cuban (3.9%), and Mexican (4.8%) adults to be unable to work due to health problems.
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June 2016

Health Care Access and Utilization Among Adults Aged 18-64, by Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2013 and 2014.

NCHS Data Brief 2015 Jul(208):1-8

In 2014, U.S. adults could buy a private health insurance plan through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges established as part of the Affordable Care Act. Moreover, some states opted to expand Medicaid coverage to low-income adults. Data from the 2013 and 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) are used to describe recent changes in health insurance coverage and selected measures of health care access and utilization for adults aged 18–64, by race and Hispanic origin.
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July 2015

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2012.

Vital Health Stat 10 2013 Dec(259):1-95

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Estimates are disaggregated by sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Data Source: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2012, household interviews were completed for 108,131 persons living in 42,366 households.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2012. About 40 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 5 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 10 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. Among persons under age 65, about 45 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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December 2013

Health behaviors of adults: United States, 2008-2010.

Vital Health Stat 10 2013 May(257):1-184

Objective-This report presents selected prevalence estimates for key health behaviors-alcohol use, cigarette smoking, leisure-time physical activity, body mass index, and sleep-among U.S. adults, using data from the 2008-2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). NHIS is a continuous survey conducted annually by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Estimates are shown for several sociodemographic subgroups for both sexes combined and for men and women separately. Methods-Data representing the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population were collected using computer-assisted personal interviews. NHIS is a general purpose in-person household survey, collecting basic health, health care utilization, and demographic information on all household members with the Family questionnaire. Health behavior questions are asked in the Sample Adult survey component. This report is based on a total of 76,669 completed interviews with sample adults aged 18 and over. Statistics shown in this report were age adjusted to the projected 2000 U.S. population. Results-About 6 in 10 (64.9%) U.S. adults were current drinkers in 2008-2010; about 1 in 5 adults (20.9%) were lifetime abstainers. About one in five adults (20.2%) were current smokers and over one-half of adults (58.6%) had never smoked cigarettes. Less than one-half of current smokers (45.8%) attempted to quit smoking in the past year. Nearly one-half (46.1%) of adults met the federal guidelines for aerobic physical activity, about one-quarter (23.0%) of adults met the federal guidelines for muscle-strengthening physical activity, and about one in five adults (19.4%) met both guidelines. About 6 in 10 adults (62.1%) were overweight or obese (BMI ≥ 25), with about 4 in 10 (36.1%) adults being of healthy weight (18.5 ≤ BMI less than 25). About 7 in 10 adults (69.7%) met the Healthy People 2020 objective for sufficient sleep.
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May 2013

Summary health statistics for the u.s. Population: national health interview survey, 2011.

Vital Health Stat 10 2012 Dec(255):1-110

Objectives-This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Estimates are disaggregated by sex, age, race, Hispanic origin, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage. Data Source-NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2011, household interviews were completed for 101,875 persons living in 39,509 households, reflecting a household response rate of 82.0%. Selected Highlights-Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2011. About 40 million persons (13%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 5 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 10 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 7% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65, about 45 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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December 2012

Oral health status and access to oral health care for U.S. adults aged 18-64: National Health Interview Survey, 2008.

Vital Health Stat 10 2012 Jul(253):1-22

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents statistics from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on selected measures of oral health status and oral health care access for adults aged 18-64. Estimates are presented by sex, age, race and ethnicity, nativity, education, poverty status, health and dental insurance status, region, place of residence, dentition status, current smoking status, current drinking status, and diabetes status.

Data Source: NHIS is a multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics, and is representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States. Data are collected for all family members during face-to-face interviews with adults present at the time of interview. Additional health information is obtained from one randomly selected adult. If the selected adult is physically or mentally incapable of responding for himself or herself, a proxy respondent is used.

Selected Highlights: Among adults aged 18-64, about three-quarters had very good or good oral health, 17% had fair oral health, and 7% had poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid were almost five times as likely as adults with private health insurance to have poor oral health. Adults with Medicaid (21%) were almost twice as likely as adults overall (12%) to not have had a dental visit in more than 5 years. Among adults aged 18-64, the main reason to forgo a dental visit for an oral health problem in the past 6 months was cost; 42% could not afford treatment or did not have insurance. Fear was the reason that 1 out of 10 adults did not visit the dentist for an oral health problem.
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July 2012

Smoking and oral health in dentate adults aged 18-64.

NCHS Data Brief 2012 Feb(85):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

This report shows that among dentate adults aged 18–64 there are differences in oral health status and oral health care utilization among current smokers, former smokers, and never smokers. Overall, current smokers had a poorer oral health status and more oral health problems than either former smokers or never smokers. Current smokers were also more likely to delay routine dental visits. When current smokers experienced a mouth or tooth problem, they were less likely to visit a dental health professional because they were unable to afford dental care than former smokers or never smokers. However, current smokers were more likely to think that their oral health problem was important. The evidence for an association between tobacco use and oral diseases has been clearly shown in every Surgeon General’s report on tobacco since 1964 (6). Tobacco use is a risk factor for oral cancers, periodontal diseases, and dental caries, among other diseases. Oral health problems may be early warning signs of other medical problems such as diabetes, HIV, heart disease, or stroke (6). Good oral health is integral to good general health.
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February 2012

Use of the internet for health information: United States, 2009.

NCHS Data Brief 2011 Jul(66):1-8

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics 3311 Toledo Road, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Research has shown that 74% of all U.S. adults use the Internet, and 61% have looked for health or medical information on the Internet. Additionally, 49% have accessed a website that provides information about a specific medical condition or problem. In 2009, the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) became the first nationally representative household survey to collect data on the use of health information technology when the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation sponsored 10 questions that asked about use of the Internet to look up health information, refill a prescription, schedule a medical appointment, learn about health topics in online chat groups, and e-mail a health care provider. This report provides estimates, using 2009 NHIS data, about adult use of the Internet for health information in the past 12 months, by selected sociodemographic characteristics.
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July 2011

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2009.

Vital Health Stat 10 2010 Dec(248):1-115

Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, MD, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Data Source: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2009, household interviews were completed for 88,446 persons living in 33,856 households, reflecting a household response rate of 82.2%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2009. About 40 million persons (13%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 9 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 7% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 46 million (18%) had no health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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December 2010

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2008.

Vital Health Stat 10 2009 Dec(243):1-104

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2008, household interviews were completed for 74,236 persons living in 28,790 households, reflecting a household response rate of 84.9%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2008. About 37 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 9 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 44 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most comrnon reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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December 2009

Health characteristics of the American Indian or Alaska Native adult population: United States, 2004-2008.

Natl Health Stat Report 2010 Mar(20):1-22

Division of Health Interview Statistics, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objective: This report compares national estimates for selected health status indicators, health behaviors, health care utilization, health conditions, immunizations, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing status for American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) adults with those for white, black, Asian, and Hispanic adults aged 18 years and over.

Methods: The estimates in this report were derived from the Family Core and the Sample Adult core components of the 2004-2008 National Health Interview Surveys, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Estimates were generated and compared using the SUDAAN statistical package to account for the complex sample design.

Results: In general, compared with other groups, non-Hispanic AIAN adults' are more likely to have poorer health, unmet medical needs due to cost, diabetes, trouble hearing, activity limitations, and to have experienced feelings of psychological distress in the past 30 days. Non-Hispanic AIAN adults are more likely to be current smokers and current drinkers compared with other adults.

Conclusion: The non-Hispanic AIAN community faces many health challenges as reflected in their higher rates of risky health behaviors, poorer health status and health conditions, and lower utilization of health services.
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March 2010

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2007.

Vital Health Stat 10 2008 Nov(238):1-104

Division of Health Interview Statistics, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2007, household interviews were completed for 75,764 persons living in 29,266 households, reflecting a household response rate of 87.1%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2007. About 36 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 9 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 43 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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November 2008

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2006.

Vital Health Stat 10 2008 Jan(236):1-104

Division of Health Interview Statistics, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objective: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2006 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2006, household interviews were completed for 75,716 persons living in 29,204 households, reflecting a household response rate of 87.3%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2006. About 36 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 8 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 43 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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January 2008

Health characteristics of the Asian adult population: United States, 2004-2006.

Adv Data 2008 Jan(394):1-22

Division of Health Interview Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objective: This report compares national estimates for selected health status indicators, health behaviors, health care utilization, health conditions, immunizations, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing status among selected non-Hispanic Asian adult subgroups. Comparison estimates for the non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN), and Hispanic adult populations are also presented.

Methods: The estimates in this report were derived from the Family Core and the Sample Adult Core components of the 2004-2006 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS), conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Estimates were generated and comparisons conducted using the SUDAAN statistical package to account for the complex sample design.

Results: In general, non-Hispanic Asian adults were least likely to be current smokers, be obese, have hypertension, delay or not receive medical care because of cost, be tested for HIV, or be in fair or poor health compared with non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic AIAN, or Hispanic adults. Across non-Hispanic Asian subgroups, Vietnamese adults were least likely to have a bachelor's degree or higher and most likely to be poor, be in fair or poor health, and abstain from alcohol use. Korean adults were most likely to be uninsured, be current smokers, and be without a usual place for health care. Japanese adults were most likely to be current moderate or heavier drinkers, and Filipino adults were most likely to be obese.
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January 2008

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2005.

Vital Health Stat 10 2007 Jan(233):1-104

Division of Health Interview Statistics, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injury and poisoning episodes, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2005, household interviews were completed for 98,649 persons living in 38,509 households, reflecting a household response rate of 86.5%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2005. About 34 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions. About 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living, and about 8 million persons (4%) required the help of another person with instrumental activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 42 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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January 2007

Health behaviors of adults: United States, 2002-04.

Vital Health Stat 10 2006 Sep(230):1-140

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objective: This report presents selected prevalence estimates of alcohol use, cigarette smoking, leisure-time physical activity, body weight status, and sleep habits among U.S. adults, using data from the 2002-04 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). NHIS is conducted annually by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Estimates are shown for several sociodemographic subgroups for both sexes combined and for men and women separately. The subgroups are compared in terms of their prevalence of "healthy" and "unhealthy" behaviors.

Methods: Data for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population were collected by NHIS using computer-assisted personal interviews. Questions on health behaviors were asked of one randomly selected adult per family in the Sample Adult component of the basic core questionnaire. This report is based on a total of 93,222 completed interviews with sample adults aged 18 years and over, representing an overall sample adult response rate of 73.6% for the 3 years combined. Statistics shown in this report were age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population.

Results: Six in 10 U.S. adults were current drinkers in 2002-04; about 1 in 4 adults were lifetime abstainers. About 1 in 5 adults (21.5%) were current smokers, and over one-half of adults (56.6%) had never smoked cigarettes. About 4 in 10 (42.4%) current smokers tried to quit smoking in the past year. About 6 in 10 adults engaged in at least some leisure-time physical activity, with about 3 in 10 regularly engaging in such activities. About 6 in 10 adults were overweight or obese (BMI is equal to or more than 25), with 4 in 10 adults being of healthy weight. About 6 in 10 adults usually slept 7-8 hours in a 24-hour period.
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September 2006

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2004.

Vital Health Stat 10 2006 Aug(229):1-104

Division of Health Interview Statistics, US Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin and race, education, family income, poverty status, health insurance coverage (where appropriate), place of residence, and region of residence. The topics covered are respondent-assessed health status, limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injuries and poisonings, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2004, household interviews were completed for 94,460 persons living in 36,579 households, reflecting a household response rate of 86.9%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2004. About 34 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions, and about 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 41 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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August 2006

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2003.

Vital Health Stat 10 2005 Apr(224):1-104

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents both age-adjusted and unadjusted health statistics from the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by age, sex, race and Hispanic or Latino origin, family income, poverty status, education, place of residence, region of residence, and where appropriate, health insurance coverage. The topics covered are health status and limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injuries and poisonings, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: The NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. In 2003, household interviews were completed for 92,148 persons living in 35,921 households, reflecting a household response rate of 89.2%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2003. About 34 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions, and about 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. Among persons under age 65 years, about 41 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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April 2005

Health behaviors of adults: United States, 1999-2001.

Vital Health Stat 10 2004 Feb(219):1-79

US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

This report presents prevalence estimates for key indicators of alcohol use, cigarette smoking, leisure-time physical activity, and body weight status among U.S. adults, using data from the 1999-2001 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS). The NHIS is conducted annually by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Estimates are shown for several sociodemographic subgroups for both sexes combined and for men and women separately. Subgroups are compared in terms of prevalence of healthy and unhealthy behaviors. Methods Data for the U.S. civilian noninstitutionalized population were collected using computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). Questions on health behaviors were asked in the Sample Adult component of the basic core questionnaire. All data were self-reported. This report is based on a total of 96,501 completed interviews with sample adults aged 18 years and over, representing an overall sample adult response rate of 71.8% for the 3 years combined. Statistics were age adjusted to the 2000 U.S. standard population. Results Overall, 6 in 10 U.S. adults were current drinkers in 1999-2001; about 1 in 4 adults (23.1%) were lifetime abstainers. About 1 in 4 adults (23.1%) were current smokers and over one-half of adults (54.3%) had never smoked cigarettes. About 6 in 10 adults engaged in at least some leisure-time physical activity with about 3 in 10 regularly engaging in such activities. About 6 in 10 adults were overweight or obese (BMI > or = 25), with 4 in 10 adults having a healthy weight.
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February 2004

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2001.

Vital Health Stat 10 2003 Dec(217):1-82

US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents health statistics from the 2001 National Health Interview Survey for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by age, sex, race and Hispanic or Latino origin, family income, poverty status, education, place of residence, region of residence, and, where appropriate, health insurance coverage. The topics covered are health status and limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injuries and poisonings, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: The NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control's National Center for Health Statistics. Household interviews were completed for 100,760 persons living in 38,932 households, reflecting a household response rate of 89%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2001. About 33 million persons (12%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions, and about 4 million persons (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living. Persons with the least education and the lowest incomes were the most likely to be limited in their ability to work. About 6% of children received special education or early intervention services. The three leading causes of medically attended injury and poisoning episodes were falls, transportation, and overexertion. Among persons under age 65 years, about 39 million (16%) did not have any health insurance coverage. The most common reason for lacking health insurance was cost, followed by a change in employment.
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December 2003

Summary health statistics for the U.S. population: National Health Interview Survey, 2000.

Vital Health Stat 10 2003 Nov(214):1-83

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782, USA.

Objectives: This report presents health statistics from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey for the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, classified by age, sex, race and Hispanic or Latino origin, family income, poverty status, education, place of residence, region of residence, and, where appropriate, health insurance coverage. The topics covered are health status and limitations in activities, special education or early intervention services, injuries and poisonings, health care access and utilization, and health insurance coverage.

Source Of Data: The NHIS is a household, multistage probability sample survey conducted annually by interviewers of the U.S. Census Bureau for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Household interviews were completed for 100,618 persons living in 38,633 households, reflecting a household response rate of 89%.

Selected Highlights: Nearly 7 in 10 persons were in excellent or very good health in 2000, and fewer than 1 in 10 were in fair or poor health. About 31 million people (11%) were limited in their usual activities due to one or more chronic health conditions, and about 3 million people (2%) required the help of another person with activities of daily living such as bathing and dressing. Persons with the least education and the lowest incomes were the most likely to be limited in their ability to work. About 5% of children received special education or early intervention services. The three leading causes of medically attended injury and poisoning episodes were falls, being struck by a person or an object, and transportation. Among people under age 65 years, about 40 million (17%) did not have any health insurance coverage.
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November 2003

Body weight status of adults: United States, 1997-98.

Adv Data 2002 Sep(330):1-15

Division of Health Interview Statistics, Department of Health And Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center For Health Statistics, Hyattsville, Maryland 20782-2003, USA.

Objective: This report presents estimates for underweight, healthy weight, overweight, and obesity for U.S. adults aged 18 years and over. Based on self-reported height and weight, data are shown for selected population subgroups for both sexes and for men and women separately.

Methods: Body weight status of U.S. adults was estimated using data from the 1997-98 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for 68,556 adults aged 18 years and over and Body Mass Index (BMI) (weight/height2) criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO). The NHIS is administered in households throughout the United States using computer-assisted personal interviews (CAPI). The combined overall response rate in 1997-98 was 77.2%. Statistics shown in this report were age adjusted to the 2000 projected U.S. population.

Findings: Over one-half of adults (54.7%) were overweight and 1 in 5 (19.5%) were obese in 1997-98. Women (49.5%) were more likely than men (36.3%) to be of healthy weight although men and women were equally likely to be obese. Obesity was most prevalent among middle-aged adults, among black non-Hispanic adults and Hispanic adults, and among adults with less education and lower income. Rates of obesity by marital status differed by gender: married men (20.4%) had higher rates of obesity than separated and divorced men (16.8%), and married women (18.4%) had lower rates of obesity than separated and divorced women (23.2%). Obesity was lowest among adults living in the West and those living in a metropolitan statistical area (MSA), but outside the central city (i.e., the suburbs).

Conclusions: Overweight and obesity were widespread in the United States in 1997-98 and prevalence varied significantly by population subgroup.
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September 2002