Publications by authors named "Patricia Dupre"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Investigation of the Lignan Content in Extracts from Linum, Callitris and Juniperus Species in Relation to Their In Vitro Antiproliferative Activities.

Planta Med 2017 Apr 24;83(6):574-581. Epub 2016 Oct 24.

LBLGC, Université d'Orléans, Orléans, France.

Podophyllotoxin, a lignan still extracted from the rhizomes of (Berberidaceae), is the starting molecule for the semisynthesis of widely used anticancer drugs such as etoposide. However, this source is threatened by the over-collection of . Plants belonging to the Linaceae and Cupressaceae families could be attractive alternative sources with species that contain the lignan podophyllotoxin or its precursors and derivatives. Wild flax species, such as , as well as some and species were investigated for their lignan content, and the antiproliferative capacity of their extracts was assayed on four tumor cell lines. Some of the lignans were detected by LC-HRMS for the first time in these extracts.In addition, lignans purified from these plants and compounds semisynthesized from commercially available podophyllotoxin were tested in terms of their antiproliferative activity. The genus was the most promising given its antiproliferative effects, which were also observed with extracts from and species.The antiproliferative effect of the plant extracts studied here appears to correlate well with the contents of the aryltetralin lignan podophyllotoxin and its glycoside as well as with deoxypodophyllotoxin and 6-methoxypodophyllotoxin. The strongest correlation between the lignan content of the extracts and the antiproliferative activity was observed for 6-methoxypodophyllotoxin. Regarding the possibility of producing large renewable amounts of 6-methoxypodophyllotoxin, this molecule could be of interest to produce new anticancer drugs and to bypass the resistance mechanisms against podophyllotoxin-derived drugs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-118650DOI Listing
April 2017

Podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin in Juniperus bermudiana and 12 other Juniperus species: optimization of extraction, method validation, and quantification.

J Agric Food Chem 2011 Aug 15;59(15):8101-7. Epub 2011 Jul 15.

Laboratoire de Biologie des Ligneux et des Grandes Cultures (LBLGC), UPRES EA 1207, Antenne Scientifique Universitaire de Chartres (ASUC), Université d'Orléans, Chartres, France.

The lignans podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin are secondary metabolites with potent pharmaceutical applications in cancer therapy. However, the supply of podophyllotoxin from its current natural source, Podophyllum hexandrum, is becoming increasingly problematic, and alternative sources are therefore urgently needed. So far, podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin have been found in some Juniperus species, although at low levels in most cases. Moreover, extraction protocols deserve optimization. This study aimed at developing and validating an efficient extraction protocol of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from Juniperus species and applying it to 13 Juniperus species, among which some had never been previously analyzed. Juniperus bermudiana was used for the development and validation of an extraction protocol for podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin allowing extraction yields of up to 22.6 mg/g DW of podophyllotoxin and 4.4 mg/g DW deoxypodophyllotoxin, the highest values found in leaf extract of Juniperus. The optimized extraction protocol and HPLC separation from DAD or MS detections were established and validated to investigate podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin contents in aerial parts of 12 other Juniperus species. This allowed either higher yields to be obtained in some species reported to contain these two compounds or the occurrence of these compounds in some other species to be reported for the first time. This efficient protocol allows effective extraction of podophyllotoxin and deoxypodophyllotoxin from aerial parts of Juniperus species, which could therefore constitute interesting alternative sources of these valuable metabolites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf201410pDOI Listing
August 2011

The Arabidopsis ABA-INSENSITIVE (ABI) 4 factor acts as a central transcription activator of the expression of its own gene, and for the induction of ABI5 and SBE2.2 genes during sugar signaling.

Plant J 2009 Aug 26;59(3):359-74. Epub 2009 Mar 26.

Departamento de Biología Molecular de Plantas, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelos, México.

The transcription factor ABA INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4), discovered nearly 10 years ago, plays a central role in a variety of functions in plants, including sugar responses. However, not until very recently has its mechanism of action begun to be elucidated. Modulating gene expression is one of the primary mechanisms of sugar regulation in plants. Nevertheless, the transcription factors involved in regulating sugar responses and their role(s) during the signal transduction cascade remain poorly defined. In this paper we analyzed the participation of ABI4, as it is one of the main transcription factors implicated in glucose signaling during early seedling development. Our studies show that ABI4 is an essential activator of its own expression during development, in ABA signaling and in sugar responses. It is also important for the glucose-mediated expression of the genes ABI5 and SBE2.2. We demonstrate that ABI4 binds directly to the promoter region of all three genes and activates their expression in vivo through at CE1-like element. Previous studies found that ABI4 also functions as a transcriptional repressor of sugar-regulated genes, therefore this transcription factor is a versatile protein with dual functions for modulating gene expression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2009.03877.xDOI Listing
August 2009

Activity of a flax pectin methylesterase promoter in transgenic tobacco pollen.

J Plant Physiol 2003 Aug;160(8):977-9

Laboratoire de Biotechnologies et Physiologie Végétales, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Faculté des Sciences, 33, rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex, France.

The regulatory region of the flax Lupme3 gene, which codes for a pectin methylesterase, contains two sequences (PB box) that are putative cis-active sequence elements thought to regulate transcription in pollen. The Lupme3 promoter was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (gus) reporter gene. The chimeric gene fusion was introduced into tobacco via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Expression of the reporter gene was monitored using a histochemical X-Gluc assay at different stages of pollen maturation and germination. The Lupme3 promoter was found to be active in germination-competent mature pollen and in pollen tube.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1078/0176-1617-00786DOI Listing
August 2003
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