Publications by authors named "Patrícia Pauletto"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence of orofacial injuries in wheeled non-motor sports athletes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Dent Traumatol 2021 Aug 1;37(4):546-556. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Department of Dentistry, Brazilian Centre for Evidence-Based Research (COBE), Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Brazil.

Background/aims: As the popularity of sports activities grows, so do the number of sport-related injuries. Furthermore, sports that use equipment or vehicles that modify the speed of the player can present more serious injuries. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the overall prevalence of orofacial trauma in wheeled non-motor sports athletes.

Methods: The search strategy was applied in eight electronic databases (Embase, LILACS, Livivo, PEDro, PubMed, Scopus, SportDiscus, and Web of Science). Additionally, a complementary search of the gray literature (Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global), reference lists of included articles, and studies indicated by experts on the subject was done. The included articles were observational studies with sufficient data of orofacial trauma (type and anatomical site) in wheeled non-motor sport athletes, regardless of the competition level. Risk of bias was assessed by using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data. The meta-analysis was performed using R Statistics software, and the strength of cumulative evidence was assessed by The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation.

Results: From 4042 identified studies, after the removal of duplicates and phase one of selection (title and abstracts screening), 251 studies remained for phase two (full-text screening). Five articles were finally included. One study was considered to have a low risk of bias and four had a moderate risk of bias. The cumulative prevalence of orofacial injuries in wheeled non-motor sport athletes was 21.7% (CI: 8.7-34.7; I :97.6%) and the prevalence of dental injuries in these sports was 7.5% (CI:4.3-10.7; I :61.9%). The certainty in cumulative evidence was considered to be very low.

Conclusion: About 22% of the wheeled non-motor sport athletes have suffered orofacial injuries. The most prevalent type of injury was classified as dental trauma.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/edt.12661DOI Listing
August 2021

Association between obstructive sleep apnea and health-related quality of life in untreated adults: a systematic review.

Sleep Breath 2021 Mar 11. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Department of Dentistry, Brazilian Centre for Evidence-Based Research, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Caixa Postal 476 - Trindade, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Brazil.

Purpose: The objective of this systematic review was to answer the question: "Is there association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in untreated adults?"

Methods: We included observational studies that evaluated the health-related quality of life of patients with OSA vs control groups, through generic and disease-specific questionnaires. The searches were conducted in six databases: Embase, Lilacs, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science. Additional search in the grey literature and hand search were performed, and also experts were consulted. Risk of bias was performed by using Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for cross-sectional, cohort, and case-control studies. We analyzed the data using a narrative synthesis. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation evidence profile was used to verify the overall certainty of the assessed evidence.

Results: Nineteen studies were included for qualitative analysis. Generic questionnaires showed worse HRQoL in the OSA group compared to the control group in at least one domain of the HRQoL questionnaires. The affected domains that showed statistical and clinically relevant differences were physical functioning, physical role, pain, general health, vitality, emotional role, and mental health. The certainty of evidence assessment was very low.

Conclusion: The available literature suggests that OSA in untreated adults is associated with worse HRQoL. However, this association seems to disappear when we consider only studies adjusted for related covariates.

Registration: CRD42018114746.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-021-02323-1DOI Listing
March 2021

Association Between Sleep Bruxism and Quality of Life: A Systematic Review.

J Oral Facial Pain Headache 2020 Fall;34(4):341-352

Aims: To evaluate the association between sleep bruxism (SB) and quality of life (QoL) in the general population.

Methods: A systematic review was conducted, and studies were included with no restrictions regarding age, gender, or language. SB and general health-related QoL and/or oral health-related QoL (OHRQoL) measures in the included studies needed to be based on validated tools. The databases searched were Google Scholar, LILACS, OpenGrey, ProQuest, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. Quality of evidence was evaluated using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklists and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) criteria.

Results: Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Ten studies were published in English, and four in Portuguese. All studies evaluating the association of SB with health-related QoL showed no statistical significance when overall scores were considered. The overall quality of evidence was considered very low due to high heterogeneity among the studies. SB seemed not to be associated with health-related QoL, but did have a negative impact on some characteristics of OHRQoL.

Conclusion: There is insufficient scientific evidence to support or disprove the association between SB and QoL/OHRQoL in the general population.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/ofph.2687DOI Listing
December 2020

Effect of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive in postoperative palatal pain management: a systematic review.

Clin Oral Investig 2021 Jun 17;25(6):3609-3622. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Ceramic and Composite Materials Research Group, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil.

Objective: To critically appraise available literature concerning the effect of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive (CTA) in postoperative palatal pain management.

Materials And Methods: Electronic databases (Cochrane, PubMed, LILACS, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched, complemented with grey literature databases up to June 2020. Studies reporting the effect of cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive compared to any other methods in postoperative palatal pain management were considered eligible. The risk of bias among and across included studies was assessed.

Results: Finally, four studies were considered eligible. Regarding free gingival graft (FGG), cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive with hemostatic sponge promoted less postoperative pain (PP) and analgesic consumption (AC). Also, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive with platelet-rich fibrin produced less PP and more wound healing at the palatal area than cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive and wet gauze. Additionally, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive promoted less PP and AC than wet gauze and suture. Concerning connective tissue graft (CTG), cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive, and suture produced similar PP, AC, and willingness for retreatment.

Conclusions: Based on the low certainty level, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive appears to promote less PP and AC than wet gauze and suture regarding FGG. Additionally, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive appears to increase the effect of hemostatic sponge, contributing to the reduction of PP and AC. Regarding CTG, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive appears to promote similar PP, AC, and willingness for retreatment than the suture. Therefore, cyanoacrylate tissue adhesive has shown promising usefulness for PP management in FGG, but not a clear benefit for CTG.

Clinical Relevance: The adoption of different agents for the protection of the palatal donor site following gingival harvesting procedures may provide better comfort to the patient.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-020-03683-wDOI Listing
June 2021

Prevalence of dentofacial injuries in contact sports players: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Dent Traumatol 2020 Oct 16;36(5):477-488. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Brazilian Centre for Evidence Based Research, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, Brazil.

Backgrounds/aims: Contact sports present intense physical contact, and usually, players have a high risk for dentofacial injuries. It is unclear how often these injuries occur and which contact sports present the highest rates. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dentofacial injuries among contact sports participants.

Methods: A literature search was performed in seven electronic databases (Embase, LILACS, LIVIVO, PubMed, Scopus, SportDiscus, and Web of Science). The gray literature (Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ProQuest), as well as the reference lists of included studies, was assessed. Experts were consulted to indicate additional studies. The eligible studies were observational studies that contained details of the contact sports participants who were aged over 18 years old, either professional or not, who sustained at least one dentofacial injury in the past, the number of sustained injuries, and studies which provided quantitative data on the characteristics of the dentofacial injuries, such as type and site. Risk of bias was assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Checklist for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data.

Results: Among 1152 identified studies, 17 articles remained for final analysis. One study was classified as high risk of bias, 14 studies as moderate, and two as low risk. The overall prevalence of dentofacial injuries was 27.57% (95% CI: 17.87-38.47). The prevalence in each sport was rugby 37.36% (95% CI: 17.45-59.82), basketball 27.26% (95% CI: 9.45-50.08), handball 24.59% (95% CI: 14.88-35.83), and field hockey 19.07% (95% CI: 6.82-35.62). The most common injury was dental injury 19.61% (95% CI: 8.13-34.56).

Conclusion: The overall prevalence of dentofacial injuries among collective contact sports participants was approximately 30%. The most common injury presented was dental injury.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/edt.12556DOI Listing
October 2020

Crestal Bone Changes in Different Implants Designs: A Prospective Clinical Trial.

Eur J Dent 2019 Oct 31;13(4):497-502. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Department of Dentistry, Lutheran University of Brazil, Canoas-RS, Brazil.

Objective:  Several modifications, such as changes in the implant-abutment connection, have been suggested in studies on dental implants to better preserve the peri-implant bone level. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare crestal bone level changes between two different implant designs-tissue level (TL) and bone level (BL).

Materials And Methods:  The sample comprised 18 patients, on whom a total of 30 hydrophilic tissue- and bone level implants were placed (SLActive, Straumann Institut AG, Basel, Switzerland), in the posterior region of the maxilla or the mandible. Impressions were taken after 45 days of healing. Then, cemented-retained metalloceramic crowns were fabricated and installed. Marginal bone level changes were assessed by the paralleling technique of periapical radiographies, on both mesial and distal aspects of each implant, at the moment of the implant placement and after 1 year of loading. Photoshop software was used to perform linear measurements by a single and calibrated examiner.

Statistical Analysis:  The Mann-Whitney test at a 5% significance level was used to compare the bone changes among the implants assessed.

Results:  A significantly lower ( = 0.048) bone remodeling was observed on bone level implants (0.05 mm), when compared to tissue level implants (0.47 mm; = 0.048). The average marginal bone level changes at the distal aspect did not show any statistically significant difference ( = 0.325).

Conclusions:  Tissue level implants presented greater bone loss in the mesial surface than bone level implants. Both designs presented stable and clinically acceptable bone crests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0039-1697216DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938439PMC
October 2019

Peri-implant tissue management after immediate implant placement using a customized healing abutment.

J Esthet Restor Dent 2019 11 3;31(6):533-541. Epub 2019 Jul 3.

Department of Dentistry, Center for Education and Research on Dental Implants (CEPID), Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Brazil.

Objective: The unavoidable extraction of teeth in the esthetic area can be overcome through different treatment modalities. Recently, immediate implants appeared as a minimally invasive approach to resolving these cases; however, immediate implant loading is not always possible or indicated. In these cases, an innovative approach through customized healing abutments could be used to preserve the soft tissue contour, eliminating the need for reopening surgery and the use of provisional restorations to condition the mucosal contour.

Clinical Considerations: The present cases describe a simplified chairside approach to use customized healing abutments for immediate implants placed after tooth extraction in the anterior and posterior areas in order to maintain the soft tissue contours while reducing the clinical steps until delivering the final restorations.

Conclusions: This technique seems to be effective to guide the soft tissue healing around dental implants allowing a natural emergence profile with implant-supported restorations, reducing the number of treatment steps.

Clinical Significance: The use of customized healing abutments prepares soft tissue for the prosthetic stage preserving its contours and eliminating the need for reopening surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jerd.12512DOI Listing
November 2019

Bruxism: An umbrella review of systematic reviews.

J Oral Rehabil 2019 Jul 7;46(7):666-690. Epub 2019 May 7.

Department of Dentistry, Brazilian Centre for Evidence-Based Research, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.

Objectives: To synthesise available knowledge about both sleep (SB) and awake bruxism (AB) as depicted by previous published systematic reviews (SR).

Methods: SR investigating any bruxism-related outcome were selected in a two-phase process. Searches were performed on seven main electronic databases and a partial grey literature search on three databases. Risk of bias of included SR was assessed using the "University of Bristol's tool for assessing risk of bias in SR".

Results: From 1038 studies, 41 SR were included. Findings from these SR suggested that (a) among adults, prevalence of AB was 22%-30%, SB (1%-15%), and SB among children and adolescents (3%-49%); (b) factors consistently associated with bruxism were use of alcohol, caffeine, tobacco, some psychotropic medications, oesophageal acidification and second-hand smoke; temporomandibular disorder signs and symptoms presented a plausible association; (c) portable diagnostic devices showed overall higher values of specificity (0.83-1.00) and sensitivity (0.40-1.00); (d) bruxism might result in biomechanical complications regarding dental implants; however, evidence was inconclusive regarding other dental restorations and periodontal impact; (e) occlusal appliances were considered effective for bruxism management, although current evidence was considered weak regarding other therapies.

Conclusions: Current knowledge from SR was mostly related to SB. Higher prevalence rates were found in children and adolescents than in adults. Associated factors and bruxism effects on stomatognathic structures were considerably heterogeneous and inconsistent. Overall good accuracy regarding portable diagnostic devices was found. Interventions' effectiveness was mostly inconclusive regarding the majority of available therapies, with the exception of occlusal appliances.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joor.12801DOI Listing
July 2019

Fixed and Removable Full-Arch Restorations Supported by Short (≤ 8-mm) Dental Implants In the Mandible: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Int J Oral Maxillofac Implants 2019 July/August;34(4):873–885. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Purpose: To evaluate, through a systematic review of the literature, the published data regarding marginal bone loss, implant failure proportion, biologic and prosthetic complications, and risk factors associated with short (≤ 8-mm) implants supporting fixed or removable full-arch restorations in the edentulous mandible.

Materials And Methods: Two reviewers performed a search of five databases, with handsearching through the reference lists and grey literature. Controlled clinical trials and prospective cohort studies were selected in a two-phase process. The data were independently gathered for the same two reviewers. Quality assessment of the studies was done using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for Randomized Clinical Trials and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for Prospective Cohort Studies. Marginal bone loss and Implant failure proportion were meta-analyzed using random (R-Em) and fixed-effects models (FEm), respectively, with a 95% confidence interval. A descriptive analysis was performed of the prevalence of biologic and prosthetic complications. Meta-regression analysis was run as fixed-effect models for risk factors.

Results: Six studies met the eligibility criteria and had data extracted. A total of 291 short implants (lengths 5 to 8 mm) were placed in 122 patients (82 females; mean age, 64.7 ± 10.8) supporting 23 fixed and 99 removable full-arch restorations. The pooled marginal bone loss overall was 0.12 mm (0.07 to 0.17 mm). Marginal bone loss for fixed full-arch restorations was 0.11 mm (0.01 to 0.21 mm) and for removable full-arch restorations was 0.14 mm (0.07 to 0.21 mm). The pooled implant failure proportion was 2.0% (1.0% to 5.0%) for the overall studies. Implant failure proportion for fixed and removable restorations was 2.0% with a confidence interval of (0.0% to 9%) and (0.0% to 6%), respectively. The prevalence of prosthetic complications was 34.5% for fixed restorations and 2.6% for removable restorations. No biologic complications were found for fixed restorations, while 13.1% of removable restorations did have biologic complications. Risk factors did not demonstrate statistical differences regarding Implant failure proportion and marginal bone loss. All included studies demonstrated a high methodological quality.

Conclusion: Findings from this systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that full-arch restorations supported by short implants in atrophic edentulous mandibles might be a viable treatment option, presenting minimal marginal bone loss and implant failure in the short-term. However, further well-performed prospective clinical trials with long-term observation are needed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.11607/jomi.7241DOI Listing
January 2020
-->