Publications by authors named "Patrícia Lyra"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Tooth Loss and Blood Pressure in Parkinson's Disease Patients: An Exploratory Study on NHANES Data.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2021 May 10;18(9). Epub 2021 May 10.

Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Clinical Research Unit (CRU), Egas Moniz-Cooperativa de Ensino Superior, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal.

To evaluate tooth loss severity in PD patients and the impact of missing teeth on blood pressure (BP) and glycated hemoglobin (Hba1c) levels. All adults reporting specific PD medication regimens with complete dental examinations were included from the NHANES 2001 to 2018 databases. Sociodemographic, systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and Hba1c data were compared according to tooth loss severity, and linear regression analyses on the impact of tooth loss on SBP, DBP and Hba1c levels were conducted. The 214 included participants presented 9.7 missing teeth, 23.8% severe tooth loss and 18.2% total edentulousness. Severe tooth loss cases were significantly older ( < 0.001), had higher smoking prevalence ( = 0.008), chronic medical conditions ( = 0.012) and higher Hba1c ( = 0.001), SBP ( = 0.015) and DBP ( < 0.001) levels. Crude and adjusted linear models revealed a relationship between SBP, DBP and missing teeth; however, age confounded these links (SBP: B = 0.10, SE = 0.16, < 0.05; DBP: B = 0.16, SE = 0.10, < 0.05). Tooth loss presented no significant relationship with Hba1c levels. Severe tooth loss is prevalent among PD patients. Blood pressure levels showed a positive linear relationship with the number of missing teeth, although age was a confounding factor. Furthermore, tooth loss and Hba1c levels revealed no significant linear relationship.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18095032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8126086PMC
May 2021

The Role of Inflammatory Diet and Vitamin D on the Link between Periodontitis and Cognitive Function: A Mediation Analysis in Older Adults.

Nutrients 2021 Mar 12;13(3). Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Evidence-Based Hub, Clinical Research Unit, Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Almada, Portugal.

Patients suffering from periodontitis are at a higher risk of developing cognitive dysfunction. However, the mediation effect of an inflammatory diet and serum vitamin D levels in this link is unclear. In total, 2062 participants aged 60 years or older with complete periodontal diagnosis and cognitive tests from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2012 and 2013-2014 were enrolled. The Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's disease (CERAD) word learning subtest (WLT) and CERAD delayed recall test (DRT), the animal fluency test (AFT) and the digit symbol substitution test (DSST) was used. Dietary inflammatory index (DII) was computed via nutrition datasets. Mediation analysis tested the effects of DII and vitamin D levels in the association of mean probing depth (PD) and attachment loss (AL) in all four cognitive tests. Periodontitis patients obtained worse cognitive test scores than periodontally healthy individuals. DII was negatively associated with CERAD-WLT, CERAD-DRT, AFT and DSST, and was estimated to mediate between 9.2% and 36.4% of the total association between periodontitis with cognitive dysfunction ( < 0.05). Vitamin D showed a weak association between CERAD-DRT, AFT and DSST and was estimated to between 8.1% and 73.2% of the association between periodontitis and cognitive dysfunction ( < 0.05). The association between periodontitis and impaired cognitive function seems to be mediated both by a proinflammatory dietary load and vitamin D deficiency. Future studies should further explore these mediators in the periodontitis-cognitive decline link.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu13030924DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8001166PMC
March 2021

Parkinson's Disease, Periodontitis and Patient-Related Outcomes: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Medicina (Kaunas) 2020 Jul 30;56(8). Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Clinical Research Unit (CRU), Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal.

People with Parkinson's disease (PD) may be at risk of having bad periodontal status. A consistent periodontal examination is critical to investigate how it impacts on PD quality of life. We aimed to assess the periodontal status of people with PD, and its association with quality of life and self-perceived xerostomia. To this end, from February to March 2020, we consecutively enrolled 28 PD individuals, and motor and non-motor symptoms of PD were assessed using the Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). We performed full-mouth periodontal examination and gathered information on self-perceived quality of life in PD, oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) and xerostomia. The prevalence of periodontitis was 75.0% and most cases were identified as severe (46.4%). Upper extremity rigidity, hand posture and kinetic tremors were significantly correlated with worse periodontal status. PDQ-8 showed to be correlated with self-perceived oral health-related quality of life and xerostomia levels. This group of people with PD had a high prevalence of periodontitis. Deteriorated levels of the upper extremities in advanced stages of PD were associated with worse periodontal status and hygiene habits. Quality of life in PD appears to be associated with self-perceived OHRQoL and xerostomia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/medicina56080383DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7466334PMC
July 2020

Relationship between Blood and Standard Biochemistry Levels with Periodontitis in Parkinson's Disease Patients: Data from the NHANES 2011-2012.

J Pers Med 2020 Jul 25;10(3). Epub 2020 Jul 25.

Clinical Research Unit (CRU), Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar Egas Moniz (CiiEM), Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, 2829-511 Almada, Portugal.

People with Parkinson's Disease (PD) are associated with the presence of periodontitis. We aimed to compare blood and standard biochemical surrogates of PD patients diagnosed with periodontitis with PD individuals without periodontitis. This retrospective cohort study used a sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2011-2012 that underwent periodontal diagnosis ( = 3669). PD participants were identified through specific PD reported medications. Periodontitis was defined according to the 2012 case definition, using periodontal examination data provided. Then, we compared blood levels and standard chemical laboratory profiles of PD patients according to the presence of periodontitis. Multivariable regression was used to explore this dataset and identify relevant variables towards the presence of periodontitis. According to the medication report, 37 participants were eligible, 29 were secure and 8 were unsecure PD medications regimens. Overall, PD cases with periodontitis presented increased levels of White Blood Cells (WBC) ( = 0.002), Basophils ( = 0.045) and Segmented neutrophils ( = 0.009), and also, lower levels of Total Bilirubin ( = 0.018). In the PD secure medication group, a significant difference was found for WBC ( = 0.002) and Segmented neutrophils ( = 0.002) for the periodontitis group. Further, WBC might be a discriminating factor towards periodontitis in the global sample. In the secure PD medication, we found gender, segmented neutrophils and Vitamin D2 to be potential discriminative variables towards periodontitis. Thus, periodontitis showed association with leukocyte levels alterations in PD patients, and therefore with potential systemic changes and predictive value. Furthermore, Vitamin D2 and gender showed to be associated with periodontitis in with secure medication for PD. Future studies should assess in more detail the potential systemic repercussion of the presence of periodontitis in PD patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jpm10030069DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7565163PMC
July 2020