Publications by authors named "Patrícia G Roberto"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Inhibition of snake venoms and phospholipases A(2) by extracts from native and genetically modified Eclipta alba: isolation of active coumestans.

Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol 2009 Apr;104(4):293-9

Department of Biotechnology, University of Ribeirão Preto, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.

We genetically modified Eclipta alba using Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA 9402, with the aim of producing secondary metabolites with pharmacological properties against phospholipase A(2) and the myotoxic activities of snake venom. Extracts from in natura aerial parts and roots, both native and genetically modified (in vitro), were prepared and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. In natura materials showed the coumestan wedelolactone at higher concentration in the aerial parts, while demethylwedelolactone appeared at higher concentration in roots. Among the modified roots, clone 19 showed higher concentrations of these coumestans. Our results show that the in natura extracts of plants collected from Botucatu and Ribeirão Preto were efficient in inhibiting snake venom phospholipase A(2) activity. Regarding in vitro material, the best effect against Crotalus durissus terrificus venom was that of clone 19. Clone 19 and isolated coumestans (wedelolactone and demethylwedelolactone) inhibited the myotoxic activity induced by basic phospholipases A(2) isolated from the venoms of Crotalus durissus terrificus (CB) and Bothrops jararacussu (BthTX-I and II). The search for antivenom is justified by the need of finding active principles that are more efficient in neutralizing snake venoms and also as an attempt to complement serum therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1742-7843.2008.00350.xDOI Listing
April 2009

Molecular evaluation of the incidence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in dogs from Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

Vet J 2009 Jan 24;179(1):145-8. Epub 2007 Oct 24.

Unidade de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto (UNAERP), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Canine monocytic ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichiacanis is endemic in many regions of Brazil. Since thrombocytopenia is a common finding in infected dogs, many clinicians tend to use it as an indication for antibiotic treatment. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR were used to study the presence of E. canis, Anaplasma platys and Babesia spp. in thrombocytopenic and non-thrombocytopenic dogs from Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. Despite the high prevalence of E. canis infection among thrombocytopenic dogs, 46.7% of the thrombocytopenic dogs studied were either infected with Babesia spp. or A.platys or not infected with any of the three pathogens. There was a high incidence (25.4%) of E. canis infection in non-thrombocytopenic dogs. Although infection with E. canis should be considered in thrombocytopenic dogs, the final diagnosis needs to be confirmed by complementary tests such as blood smears and PCR to avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.08.017DOI Listing
January 2009

Molecular approaches for structural characterization of Bothrops L-amino acid oxidases with antiprotozoal activity: cDNA cloning, comparative sequence analysis, and molecular modeling.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2007 Apr 10;355(2):302-6. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Unidade de Biotecnologia Vegetal, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, UNAERP, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil.

Two l-amino acid oxidases (LAAOs) were identified by random sequencing of cDNA libraries from the venom glands of Bothrops moojeni(BmooLAAO) and Bothrops jararacussu(Bjussu LAAO). Phylogenetic analysis involving other SV-LAAOs showed sequence identities within the range 83-87% being closely related to those from Agkistrodon and Trimeresurus. Molecular modeling experiments indicated the FAD-binding, substrate-binding, and helical domains of Bmoo and Bjussu LAAOs. The RMS deviations obtained by the superposition of those domains and that from Calloselasma rhodostoma LAAO crystal structure confirm the high degree of structural similarity between these enzymes. Purified BjussuLAAO-I and BmooLAAO-I exhibited antiprotozoal activities which were demonstrated to be hydrogen-peroxide mediated. This is the first report on the isolation and identification of cDNAs encoding LAAOs from Bothrops venom. The findings here reported contribute to the overall structural elucidation of SV-LAAOs and will advance the understanding on their mode of action.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2006.12.217DOI Listing
April 2007

Cloning and expression of an acidic platelet aggregation inhibitor phospholipase A2 cDNA from Bothrops jararacussu venom gland.

Protein Expr Purif 2004 Sep;37(1):102-8

Unidade de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, UNAERP, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

The phospholipase A2 (PLA2, E.C. 3.1.1.4) superfamily is defined by enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the sn-2 bond of phosphoglycerides. Most PLA2s from the venom of Bothrops species are basic proteins, which have been well characterized both structurally and functionally, however, little is known about acidic PLA2s from this venom. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that they are non-toxic, with high catalytic and hypotensive activities and show the ability to inhibit platelet aggregation. To further understand the function of these proteins, we have isolated a cDNA that encodes an acidic PLA2 from a cDNA library prepared from the poly(A)+ RNA of venom gland of Bothrops jararacussu. The full-length nucleotide sequence of 366 base pairs encodes a predicted gene product with 122 amino acid with theoretical isoelectric point and size of 5.28 and 13,685 kDa, respectively. This acidic PLA2 sequence was cloned into expression vector pET11a (+) and expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 14 kDa recombinant protein was determined. The recombinant acidic PLA2 protein was submitted to refolding and to be purified by RP-HPLC chromatography. The structure and function of the recombinant protein was compared to that of the native protein by circular dichroism (CD), enzymatic activity, edema-inducing, and platelet aggregation inhibition activities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pep.2004.05.020DOI Listing
September 2004

Cloning and identification of a complete cDNA coding for a bactericidal and antitumoral acidic phospholipase A2 from Bothrops jararacussu venom.

Protein J 2004 May;23(4):273-85

Unidade de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, UNAERP, Ribeirão Preto-SP, Brazil.

In order to better understand the function of acidic phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) from snake venoms, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that code for acidic PLA2s were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from the poly(A)+ RNA of venomous glands of Bothrops jararacussu. The complete nucleotide sequence (366 bp), named BOJU-III, encodes the BthA-I-PLA2 precursor, which includes a signal peptide and the mature protein with 16 and 122 amino acid residues, respectively. Multiple comparison of both the nucleotide and respective deduced amino acid sequence with EST and protein sequences from databases revealed that the full-length cDNA identified (BOJU III--AY145836) is related to an acidic PLA2 sharing similarity, within the range 55-81%, with acidic phospholipases from snake venoms. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences of acidic PLA2s from several pit viper genera showed close evolutionary relationships among acidic PLA2s from Bothrops, Crotalus, and Trimeresurus. The molecular modeling showed structural similarity with other dimeric class II PLA2s from snake venoms. The native protein BthA-I-PLA2, a nontoxic acidic PLA2 directly isolated from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom, was purified and submitted to various bioassays. BthA-I-PLA2 displayed high catalytic activity and induced Ca2+-dependent liposome disruption. Edema induced by this PLA2 was inhibited by indomethacin and dexamethasone, thus suggesting involvement of the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. BthA-I-PLA2 showed anticoagulant activity upon human plasma and inhibited phospholipid-dependent platelet aggregation induced by collagen or ADP. In addition, it displayed bactericidal activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and antitumoral effect upon breast adrenocarcinoma as well as upon human leukemia T and Erlich ascitic tumor. Following chemical modification with p-bromophenacyl bromide, total loss of the enzymatic and pharmacological activities were observed. This is the first report on the isolation and identification of a cDNA encoding a complete acidic PLA2 from Bothrops venom, exhibiting bactericidal and antitumoral effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/b:jopc.0000027852.92208.60DOI Listing
May 2004

Analysis of Bothrops jararacussu venomous gland transcriptome focusing on structural and functional aspects: I--gene expression profile of highly expressed phospholipases A2.

Biochimie 2004 Mar;86(3):211-9

Unidade de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, UNAERP, 14096-380 Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.

Snake venom glands are a rich source of bioactive molecules such as peptides, proteins and enzymes that show important pharmacological activity leading to in local and systemic effects as pain, edema, bleeding and muscle necrosis. Most studies on pharmacologically active peptides and proteins from snake venoms have been concerned with isolation and structure elucidation through methods of classical biochemistry. As an attempt to examine the transcripts expressed in the venom gland of Bothrops jararacussu and to unveil the toxicological and pharmacological potential of its products at the molecular level, we generated 549 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from a directional cDNA library. Sequences obtained from single-pass sequencing of randomly selected cDNA clones could be identified by similarities searches on existing databases, resulting in 197 sequences with significant similarity to phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), of which 83.2% were Lys49-PLA(2) homologs (BOJU-I), 0.1% were basic Asp49-PLA(2)s (BOJU-II) and 0.6% were acidic Asp49-PLA(2)s (BOJU-III). Adjoining this very abundant class of proteins we found 88 transcripts codifying for putative sequences of metalloproteases, which after clustering and assembling resulted in three full-length sequences: BOJUMET-I, BOJUMET-II and BOJUMET-III; as well as 25 transcripts related to C-type lectin like protein including a full-length cDNA of a putative galactose binding C-type lectin and a cluster of eight serine-proteases transcripts including a full-length cDNA of a putative serine protease. Among the full-length sequenced clones we identified a nerve growth factor (Bj-NGF) with 92% identity with a human NGF (NGHUBM) and an acidic phospholipase A(2) (BthA-I-PLA(2)) displaying 85-93% identity with other snake venom toxins. Genetic distance among PLA(2)s from Bothrops species were evaluated by phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, analysis of full-length putative Lys49-PLA(2) through molecular modeling showed conserved structural domains, allowing the characterization of those proteins as group II PLA(2)s. The constructed cDNA library provides molecular clones harboring sequences that can be used to probe directly the genetic material from gland venom of other snake species. Expression of complete cDNAs or their modified derivatives will be useful for elucidation of the structure-function relationships of these toxins and peptides of biotechnological interest.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biochi.2004.02.002DOI Listing
March 2004

Analysis and functional annotation of an expressed sequence tag collection for tropical crop sugarcane.

Genome Res 2003 Dec 12;13(12):2725-35. Epub 2003 Nov 12.

Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Instituto da Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas-SP, Brazil.

To contribute to our understanding of the genome complexity of sugarcane, we undertook a large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) program. More than 260,000 cDNA clones were partially sequenced from 26 standard cDNA libraries generated from different sugarcane tissues. After the processing of the sequences, 237,954 high-quality ESTs were identified. These ESTs were assembled into 43,141 putative transcripts. Of the assembled sequences, 35.6% presented no matches with existing sequences in public databases. A global analysis of the whole SUCEST data set indicated that 14,409 assembled sequences (33% of the total) contained at least one cDNA clone with a full-length insert. Annotation of the 43,141 assembled sequences associated almost 50% of the putative identified sugarcane genes with protein metabolism, cellular communication/signal transduction, bioenergetics, and stress responses. Inspection of the translated assembled sequences for conserved protein domains revealed 40,821 amino acid sequences with 1415 Pfam domains. Reassembling the consensus sequences of the 43,141 transcripts revealed a 22% redundancy in the first assembling. This indicated that possibly 33,620 unique genes had been identified and indicated that >90% of the sugarcane expressed genes were tagged.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/gr.1532103DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC403815PMC
December 2003

cDNA sequence and molecular modeling of a nerve growth factor from Bothrops jararacussu venomous gland.

Biochimie 2002 Jul;84(7):675-80

Departamento de Biotecnologia, Universidade de Ribeirão Preto, UNAERP, Av Costábile Romano, 2201, 14096-380 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

The complete nucleotide sequence of a nerve growth factor precursor from Bothrops jararacussu snake (Bj-NGF) was determined by DNA sequencing of a clone from cDNA library prepared from the poly(A) + RNA of the venom gland of B. jararacussu. cDNA encoding Bj-NGF precursor contained 723 bp in length, which encoded a prepro-NGF molecule with 241 amino acid residues. The mature Bj-NGF molecule was composed of 118 amino acid residues with theoretical pI and molecular weight of 8.31 and 13,537, respectively. Its amino acid sequence showed 97%, 96%, 93%, 86%, 78%, 74%, 76%, 76% and 55% sequential similarities with NGFs from Crotalus durissus terrificus, Agkistrodon halys pallas, Daboia (Vipera) russelli russelli, Bungarus multicinctus, Naja sp., mouse, human, bovine and cat, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on the amino acid sequences of 15 NGFs separate the Elapidae family (Naja and Bungarus) from those Crotalidae snakes (Bothrops, Crotalus and Agkistrodon). The three-dimensional structure of mature Bj-NGF was modeled based on the crystal structure of the human NGF. The model reveals that the core of NGF, formed by a pair of beta-sheets, is highly conserved and the major mutations are both at the three beta-hairpin loops and at the reverse turn.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0300-9084(02)01429-3DOI Listing
July 2002