Publications by authors named "Patrícia Colle"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Safety, feasibility and efficacy of side-alternating vibration therapy on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders: A pilot trial.

J Paediatr Child Health 2020 Aug 21;56(8):1257-1262. Epub 2020 May 21.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aims: A pilot study was performed to establish the safety, feasibility and efficacy of vibration therapy (VT) on bone and muscle health in children and adolescents with a range of musculoskeletal disorders.

Methods: Seventeen participants (15.7 years ± 2.9 years), with conditions that impacted on their musculoskeletal health, completed 20 weeks of side-alternating VT for 9 min/session, 4 times/week at 20 Hz. Data were collected at baseline and after 20 weeks of intervention. Assessments included whole-body dual-energyX-ray absorptiometry, muscle function (force plate) and 6-min walk test.

Results: Compliance with the prescribed VT training protocol was relatively high overall at 78% and there were no adverse events reported. After 20 weeks intervention, functional assessments showed time taken to perform the chair test was reduced by 15% (P = 0.018), leg balance improved with standard ellipse area decreasing by 88% (P = 0.006) and distance walked in the 6-min walk test improved by 9% (P = 0.002). Participants displayed increased total body mass (1.94 kg; P = 0.018) with increased lean mass (1.20 kg; P = 0.019) but not fat mass (P = 0.19). There was no change in total body bone mineral density (P = 0.44) or bone mineral content (P = 0.07).

Conclusions: Twenty weeks of side-alternating VT was a feasible protocol that was associated with improvements in physical function and no detrimental effects on lean mass, bone mass or density in children and adolescents with musculoskeletal disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jpc.14913DOI Listing
August 2020

The Effects of 20 Weeks of Side-Alternating Vibration Therapy on Physical Function, Bone and Muscle Health in Adolescents with Down Syndrome.

Phys Occup Ther Pediatr 2021 28;41(1):44-55. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Aims: To evaluate the effects of side-alternating vibration therapy on physical function and body composition in adolescents with Down syndrome.

Methods: Fourteen adolescents (8 males) with Down syndrome (mean ± SD age: 15.5 ± 2.3 years) performed vibration treatment nine minutes daily, four times per week, for 20 weeks on a Galileo vibration platform. Data were collected at baseline and after 20 weeks of intervention. Assessments included six-minute walk test, muscle function (force plate), whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography of the non-dominant tibia.

Results: After 20 weeks, participants increased their distance walked in the six-minute walk test ( = 0.009), 2-leg single jump efficiency ( = 0.024) and jump velocity ( = 0.046). Participants also increased their power ( = 0.034) and reduced the time taken during the chair rise test ( < 0.001). At the total body level, increases were seen in bone mineral density ( = 0.004), bone mineral content ( = 0.043), fat free mass ( = 0.013) and lean mass ( = 0.021).

Conclusion: Side-alternating vibration therapy was associated with increases in physical function and muscle mass with no effects on bone health in adolescents with Down syndrome.

Clinical Trial Registration Number: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ACTRN12615000092594) - registered on 4 February 2015.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01942638.2020.1758983DOI Listing
April 2020

Effects of whole-body vibration training on physical function, bone and muscle mass in adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy.

Sci Rep 2016 Mar 3;6:22518. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Liggins Institute, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

We performed a clinical trial on the effects of whole-body vibration training (WBVT) on muscle function and bone health of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy. Forty participants (11.3-20.8 years) with mild to moderate cerebral palsy (GMFCS II-III) underwent 20-week WBVT on a vibration plate for 9 minutes/day 4 times/week at 20 Hz (without controls). Assessments included 6-minute walk test, whole-body DXA, lower leg pQCT scans, and muscle function (force plate). Twenty weeks of WBVT were associated with increased lean mass in the total body (+770 g; p = 0.0003), trunk (+410 g; p = 0.004), and lower limbs (+240 g; p = 0.012). Bone mineral content increased in total body (+48 g; p = 0.0001), lumbar spine (+2.7 g; p = 0.0003), and lower limbs (+13 g; p < 0.0001). Similarly, bone mineral density increased in total body (+0.008 g/cm(2); p = 0.013), lumbar spine (+0.014 g/cm(2); p = 0.003), and lower limbs (+0.023 g/cm(2); p < 0.0001). Participants reduced the time taken to perform the chair test, and improved the distance walked in the 6-minute walk test by 11% and 35% for those with GMFCS II and III, respectively. WBVT was associated with increases in muscle mass and bone mass and density, and improved mobility of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep22518DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776132PMC
March 2016