Publications by authors named "Parvender Sheoran"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Soil spatial variability characterization: Delineating index-based management zones in salt-affected agroecosystem of India.

J Environ Manage 2021 Oct 13;296:113243. Epub 2021 Jul 13.

ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, Karnal, 132001, Haryana, India.

Farm level recommendation in salt-affected agricultural landscapes is practically difficult due to spatial variations in inherent soil salinity, diverse farming situations and associated land ownerships with small-scale production systems. This study presents spatial array analysis of 354 geo-referenced soil samples revealing widespread heterogeneity in soil sodicity and fertility status across salt-affected Ghaghar basin of Kaithal district in Haryana, India. Six principal components accounted for 73% of the total variability, and the most important contributors [electrical conductivity (EC), sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), DTPA extractable copper (Cu) and boron (B), soil organic carbon (OC) and available phosphorus (AP)] as minimum data set were used to develop the soil quality index (SQI). Geostatistical analysis revealed Circular (EC and AP), Exponential (SAR, OC and B) and Gaussian (Cu) as the best fit semivariogram ordinary kriging model with weak to moderate spatial dependence. Three soil management zones (SMZs) were delineated by grouping the entire area based on soil quality index (SQI). Fertilizer recommendations for rice-wheat cropping system in different SMZs were calculated using soil test crop response (STCR) equation to ensure balanced fertilization, resource saving and reducing environmental footprints. Gypsum requirement map was prepared for systematic allocation and distribution, and enabling farmers to precisely use the mineral gypsum in order to reclaim and reduce stresses led by sodic lands. The implications of this study showed zone-specific advocacy for gypsum application (as soil ameliorant) and balanced fertilization in sustainable restoration of sodic lands, improving nutrient use efficiency and stabilizing crop production in salt-affected regions of India and similar ecologies elsewhere.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2021.113243DOI Listing
October 2021

In situ decomposition of crop residues using lignocellulolytic microbial consortia: a viable alternative to residue burning.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Feb 24. Epub 2021 Feb 24.

ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil Science, Bhopal, 462038, India.

Open field burning of crop residue causes severe air pollution and greenhouse gas emission contributing to global warming. In order to seek an alternative, the current study was initiated to explore the prospective of lignocellulolytic microbes to expedite in situ decomposition of crop residues. Field trials on farmers' field were conducted in the state of Haryana and Maharashtra, to target the burning of rice and wheat residue and sugarcane trash, respectively. A comparative study among crop residue removal (CRR), crop residue burning (CRB) and in situ decomposition of crop residues (IND) revealed that IND of rice and wheat residues took 30 days whereas IND of sugarcane trash took 45 days. The decomposition status was assessed by determining the initial and final lignin to cellulose ratio which increased significantly from 0.23 to 0.25, 0.21 to 0.23 and 0.24 to 0.27 for rice, wheat residues and sugarcane trash, respectively. No yield loss was noticed in IND for both rice-wheat system and sugarcane-based system; rather IND showed relatively better crop yield as well as soil health parameters than CRB and CRR. Furthermore, the environmental impact assessment of residue burning indicated a substantial loss of nutrients (28-31, 23-25 and 51-77 kg ha of N+PO+KO for rice, wheat and sugarcane residue) as well as the emission of pollutants to the atmosphere. However, more field trials, as well as refinement of the technology, are warranted to validate and establish the positive potential of in situ decomposition of crop residue to make it a successful solution against the crop residue burning.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-021-12611-8DOI Listing
February 2021

Perceived Climate Variability and Compounding Stressors: Implications for Risks to Livelihoods of Smallholder Indian Farmers.

Environ Manage 2020 11 13;66(5):826-844. Epub 2020 Aug 13.

Krishi Vigyan Kendra, ICAR-Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Pali, Rajasthan, India.

Micro-scale perspectives are seldom included in planned climate change adaptations, yet farmers' perceptions can provide useful insights into livelihood impacts from interactions between climatic and other stressors. This research aims to understand how climate variability and other stressors are impacting the livelihoods of smallholder farmers in Azamgarh district, eastern Uttar Pradesh, India. Data from 84 smallholder farmers were collected using mixed qualitative and quantitative approaches, including interview and participatory methods, informed by multiple stressor and sustainable livelihood frameworks. Results revealed that farmers are increasingly facing problems caused by the reduced duration and number of rainy days, and erratic rainfall. Anomalies in seasonal cycles (longer summers, shorter winters) seem to have altered the local climate. Farmers reported that repeated drought impacts, even in years of moderate rainfall, are adversely affecting the rice crop, challenging the formal definition of drought. Climate variability, identified as the foremost stressor, often acts as a risk multiplier for ecological (e.g., soil sodicity), socio-economic (e.g., rising costs of cultivation) and political (e.g., mismatching policies and poor extension systems) stressors. In addition to climate stresses, resource-poor marginal groups in particular experienced higher risks resulting from changes in resource management regimes. This study provides an important cue to revisit the formal definitions of normal rainfall and drought, accommodating farmers' perceptions that evenly distributed rainfall, and not total rainfall is a key determinant of crop yields. Though India has developed adaptive measures for climate change and variability, integration of farmers' perceptions of climate and other stressors into such policies can improve the resilience of smallholder farmers, who have hitherto depended largely on autonomous adaptation strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00267-020-01345-xDOI Listing
November 2020

Survey of nitrogen use pattern in rice in the irrigated rice-wheat cropping system of Haryana, India.

J Environ Biol 2011 Jan;32(1):43-9

PAU Regional Research Station for Kandi Area, Ballowal Saunkhri (SBS Nagar) 114 521, India.

Seeing the sustainability of rice-wheat cropping system (RWCS) of the Indo-Gangetic Plain, adequate crop nutrition in general and nitrogen (N) in particular holds the key to sound crop management. The excessive application or insufficient management of N means an economic loss to the farmer and may lead to yield penalties and environmental problems. Improving N management in consonance with other nutrients is much important to break yield plateaus as breeding for high yielding is not happening in recent years. Findings from farm survey are used to evaluate the on-farm N management practices in rice crop of the study area. The crop management practices (especially time of sowing/transplanting and irrigation requirement) and resource base of the farmers decided the N use pattern of the farmers. The N(Physical optimum) and N(economic optimum) exceeding the recommended levels revealed the apparent need for the revalidation of the existing recommendations. Paddy yield increased significantly within different rice types. This study generated comprehensive data on N use pattern in rice in the study area.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
January 2011
-->