Publications by authors named "Parth Raval"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Resolving Atomic-Scale Interactions in Non-Fullerene Acceptor Organic Solar Cells with Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Crystallographic Modelling, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

Adv Mater 2021 Nov 24:e2105943. Epub 2021 Nov 24.

University of Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille Institut, Univ. Artois, UMR 8181, Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, Lille, F-59000, France.

Fused-ring core non-fullerene acceptors (NFAs), designated "Y-series", have enabled high-performance organic solar cells (OSCs) achieving over 18% power conversion efficiency (PCE). Since the introduction of these NFAs, much effort has been expended to understand the reasons for their exceptional performance. While several studies have identified key optoelectronic properties that govern high PCEs, little is known about the molecular level origins of large variations in performance, spanning from 5 to 18% PCE, e.g., in the case of PM6:Y6 OSCs. Here, we introduce a combined solid-state NMR, crystallography, and molecular modelling approach to elucidate the atomic-scale interactions in Y6 crystals, thin films, and PM6:Y6 bulk heterojunction (BHJ) blends. We show the Y6 morphologies in BHJ blends are not governed by the morphology in neat films or single crystals. Notably, PM6:Y6 blends processed from different solvents self-assemble into different structures and morphologies, whereby the relative orientations of the sidechains and end groups of the Y6 molecules to their fused-ring cores play a crucial role in determining the resulting morphology and overall performance of the solar cells. The molecular-level understanding of BHJs enabled by this approach will guide the engineering of next-generation NFAs for stable and efficient OSCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.202105943DOI Listing
November 2021

Cooperative Self-Assembly Driven by Multiple Noncovalent Interactions: Investigating Molecular Origin and Reassessing Characterization.

ACS Cent Sci 2021 Aug 22;7(8):1391-1399. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Department of Chemical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur 741246, India.

Cooperative interactions play a pivotal role in programmable supramolecular assembly. Emerging from a complex interplay of multiple noncovalent interactions, achieving cooperativity has largely relied on empirical knowledge. Its development as a rational design tool in molecular self-assembly requires a detailed characterization of the underlying interactions, which has hitherto been a challenge for assemblies that lack long-range order. We employ extensive one- and two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy to elucidate key structure-directing interactions in cooperatively bound aggregates of a perylene bisimide (PBI) chromophore. Analysis of H-C cross-polarization heteronuclear correlation (CP-HETCOR) and H-H double-quantum single-quantum (DQ-SQ) correlation spectra allow the identification of through-space H···C and H···H proximities in the assembled state and reveals the nature of molecular organization in the solid aggregates. Emergence of cooperativity from the synergistic interaction between a stronger π-stacking and a weaker interstack hydrogen-bonding is elucidated. Finally, using a combination of optical absorption, circular dichroism, and high-resolution MAS NMR spectroscopy based titration experiments, we investigate the anomalous solvent-induced disassembly of aggregates. Our results highlight the disparity between two well-established approaches of characterizing cooperativity, using thermal and good solvent-induced disassembly. The anomaly is explained by elucidating the difference between two disassembly pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acscentsci.1c00604DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8393228PMC
August 2021

Global mistranslation increases cell survival under stress in Escherichia coli.

PLoS Genet 2020 03 9;16(3):e1008654. Epub 2020 Mar 9.

National Centre for Biological Sciences, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bangalore, India.

Mistranslation is typically deleterious for cells, although specific mistranslated proteins can confer a short-term benefit in a particular environment. However, given its large overall cost, the prevalence of high global mistranslation rates remains puzzling. Altering basal mistranslation levels of Escherichia coli in several ways, we show that generalized mistranslation enhances early survival under DNA damage, by rapidly activating the SOS response. Mistranslating cells maintain larger populations after exposure to DNA damage, and thus have a higher probability of sampling critical beneficial mutations. Both basal and artificially increased mistranslation increase the number of cells that are phenotypically tolerant and genetically resistant under DNA damage; they also enhance survival at high temperature. In contrast, decreasing the normal basal mistranslation rate reduces cell survival. This wide-ranging stress resistance relies on Lon protease, which is revealed as a key effector that induces the SOS response in addition to alleviating proteotoxic stress. The new links between error-prone protein synthesis, DNA damage, and generalised stress resistance indicate surprising coordination between intracellular stress responses and suggest a novel hypothesis to explain high global mistranslation rates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1008654DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7082066PMC
March 2020
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