Publications by authors named "Paola Stefanoni"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Safety of outpatient stem cell mobilization with low- or intermediate-dose cyclophosphamide in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients.

Eur J Haematol 2021 Nov 4;107(5):566-572. Epub 2021 Aug 4.

Hematology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Objectives: Autologous stem cell transplantation is the gold standard for eligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Patients are usually hospitalized for administration of mobilization chemotherapy. We aimed to assess safety and efficacy of mobilization therapy with low-dose (2 g/m ) and intermediate-dose (3-4 g/m ) cyclophosphamide administered as outpatient.

Methods: A total of 176 consecutive newly diagnosed transplant-eligible myeloma patients receiving outpatient mobilization were retrospectively evaluated. Induction therapy was mainly performed with new drugs (91%).

Results: Chemotherapy was very well tolerated with 16.6% of patients having all-grade adverse events (AEs) and only 1.2% having severe AEs. The most frequently reported AEs were nausea and vomiting grade 1-2 (6.8%). Only 5.7% of patients required hospitalization for AEs. Stem cell collection was successful in 93.1% of patients, with a median CD34 harvest of 8.7 × 10 /kg. Target for 2 autologous stem cell transplantation (at least 6 CD34  × 10 /kg) was reached by 76.3% of patients. Administration of plerixafor on demand was necessary in 12.1% of patients.

Conclusions: Outpatient mobilization with low- and intermediate-dose cyclophosphamide appears an efficient and safe procedure, with minimal and manageable AEs and low rate of hospitalization.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejh.13693DOI Listing
November 2021

High Throughput Molecular Characterization of Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Context of the Prospective Trial 02/06 of the Northern Italy Leukemia Group (NILG).

Cancers (Basel) 2020 Aug 11;12(8). Epub 2020 Aug 11.

Hematology Unit, Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale (ASST), Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, 24127 Bergamo, Italy.

By way of a Next-Generation Sequencing NGS high throughput approach, we defined the mutational profile in a cohort of 221 normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (NK-AML) enrolled into a prospective randomized clinical trial, designed to evaluate an intensified chemotherapy program for remission induction. , and -ITD were the most frequently mutated genes while , , , , and mutations were more common in the mutated patients ( < 0.05). R132H mutation was strictly associated with mutation and mutually exclusive with and . In the whole cohort of NK-AML, no matter the induction chemotherapy used, by multivariate analysis, the achievement of complete remission was negatively affected by the mutation. Alterations of (ITD) and were associated with a worse overall and disease-free survival ( < 0.05). ITD positive patients who proceeded to alloHSCT had a survival probability similar to ITD negative patients and the transplant outcome was no different when comparing high and low-AR--ITD subgroups in terms of both OS and DFS. In conclusion, a comprehensive molecular profile for NK-AML allows for the identification of genetic lesions associated to different clinical outcomes and the selection of the most appropriate and effective treatment strategies, including stem cell transplantation and targeted therapies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12082242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7464263PMC
August 2020

Antiemetic prophylaxis in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a multicenter survey of the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) transplant programs.

Ann Hematol 2020 Apr 8;99(4):867-875. Epub 2020 Feb 8.

SODc Terapie Cellulari e Medicina Trasfusionale, AOU Careggi, Florence, Italy.

A survey within hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) centers of the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO) was performed in order to describe current antiemetic prophylaxis in patients undergoing HSCT. The multicenter survey was performed by a questionnaire, covering the main areas on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV): antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines used, antiemetic prophylaxis in different conditioning regimens, and methods of CINV evaluation. The survey was carried out in November 2016, and it was repeated 6 months after the publication of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC)/European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) specific guidelines on antiemetic prophylaxis in HSCT. The results show a remarkable heterogeneity of prophylaxis among the various centers and a significant difference between the guidelines and the clinical practice. In the main conditioning regimens, the combination of a serotonin receptor antagonist (5-HT-RA) with dexamethasone and neurokin receptor antagonist (NK1-RA), as recommended by MASCC/ESMO guidelines, increased from 0 to 15% (before the publication of the guidelines) to 9-30% (after the publication of the guidelines). This study shows a lack of compliance with specific antiemetic guidelines, resulting mainly in under-prophylaxis. Concerted strategies are required to improve the current CINV prophylaxis, to draft shared common guidelines, and to increase the knowledge and the adherence to the current recommendations for CINV prophylaxis in the specific field of HSCT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00277-020-03945-3DOI Listing
April 2020

Molecular Detection of Minimal Residual Disease before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Predicts a High Incidence of Early Relapse in Adult Patients with Positive Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Cancers (Basel) 2019 Sep 28;11(10). Epub 2019 Sep 28.

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, Azienda Socio Sanitaria Territoriale Papa Giovanni XXIII, 24127 Bergamo, Italy.

We analyzed the impact of alloHSCT in a single center cohort of 89 newly diagnosed AML patients, consecutively treated according to the Northern Italy Leukemia Group protocol 02/06 [NCT00495287]. After two consolidation cycles, the detection of measurable residual disease (MRD) by RQ-PCR was strongly associated with an inferior three-year overall survival (OS, 45% versus 84%, = 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS, 44% versus 76%, = 0.006). In MRD-negative patients, post-remissional consolidation with alloHSCT did not provide a significant additional benefit over a conventional chemotherapy in terms of overall survival [OS, 89% (95% CI 71-100%) versus 81% (95% CI 64-100%), = 0.59] and disease-free survival [DFS, 80% (95% CI 59-100%) versus 75% (95% CI 56-99%), = 0.87]. On the contrary, in patients with persistent MRD positivity, the three-year OS and DFS were improved in patients receiving an alloHSCT compared to those allocated to conventional chemotherapy (OS, 52% versus 31%, = 0.45 and DFS, 50% versus 17%, = 0.31, respectively). However, in this group of patients, the benefit of alloHSCT was still hampered by a high incidence of leukemia relapse during the first year after transplantation (43%, 95% CI 25-60%). Consolidative alloHSCT improves outcomes compared to standard chemotherapy in patients with persistent MRD positivity, but in these high-risk patients, the significant incidence of leukemia relapse must be tackled by post-transplant preemptive treatments.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers11101455DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6826431PMC
September 2019

Mechanisms of Resistance to Targeted Therapies in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

Handb Exp Pharmacol 2018;249:231-250

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, ASST Papa Giovanni XXIII Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy.

Patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) usually received as first-line treatment a first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Although initial responses are high, therapy fails in up to 40% of patients and initial response is lost within 2 years in approximately 25% of patients. In the last few years, intensive efforts have been spent to explain treatment failure, and different mechanisms of resistance have been identified, ranging from BCR-ABL1 kinase domain mutations to lack of adherence to therapy. In this review, we briefly summarize the clinical efficacy of approved TKIs and describe the main mechanisms of TKI resistance.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/164_2017_81DOI Listing
June 2019

Minimal Residual Disease Assessment and Risk-based Therapy in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk 2017 07;17S:S2-S9

Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, University of Milan, Bergamo, Italy.

The study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) allows a greater refinement of the individual risk classification and is the best support for risk-specific therapy with or without allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Using case-specific sensitive molecular probes or multiparametric flow cytometry on marrow samples obtained from the end of induction until midconsolidation, MRD assays can detect up to 1 leukemic cell of 10,000 total mononuclear cells (sensitivity, 0.01%; ie, ≥10). This cutoff, presently bound to technical limitations and subject to improvement, reflects the individual chemosensitivity and is strongly correlated with treatment outcome. The chance for cure is approximately 70% in the MRD-negative subset but only 20% to 30% in MRD-positive patients, in any diagnostic and risk subset. As shown by prospective trials from Germany, Italy, Spain, and France-Switzerland-Belgium, approximately 50% to 70% of unselected adult patients with Philadelphia-negative ALL achieve and maintain an early MRD response, whereas the remainder do not, including a substantial proportion of clinically standard-risk patients, and require an HCT to avert at least partially the risk of relapse. Along with the diffusion of more effective "pediatric-inspired" chemotherapy programs, the MRD analysis is an integral part of a modern management strategy, guiding the decision process to transplant or not, in which case nonrelapse mortality using HCT in first remission-still 10% to 20%-is totally abolished. The use of new agents such as monoclonal antibodies, small inhibitors, and chimeric antigen receptor T cells is opening a new era of MRD-directed therapies, that will further increase survival rates.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clml.2017.02.019DOI Listing
July 2017

Autoimmune diseases during treatment with immunomodulatory drugs in multiple myeloma: selective occurrence after lenalidomide.

Leuk Lymphoma 2014 Sep 5;55(9):2032-7. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

Hematology-Bone Marrow transplantation, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori , Milan , Italy.

Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) may favor autoimmune disease (AD) occurrence. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate AD occurrence among IMiD-treated patients with myeloma. Patients were grouped into three classes depending on the type of IMiD engaged. The first group included patients treated with thalidomide (Thal) (n = 474), the second group with lenalidomide (Len) (n = 140) and patients in the third group were first treated with Thal followed by Len (Thal-Len) (n = 94). Absolute risk of AD was 0.4% for patients treated with Thal, 4.3% for Len and 1.1% for Thal-Len. ADs manifested prevalently as autoimmune cytopenias (55%), although we observed one vasculitis, one optic neuritis, one Graves' disease and one polymyositis. ADs occurred preferentially in the first months of IMiD treatment. A previous autologous transplant was shown to be a significant risk factor. All ADs were managed with IMiD discontinuation and steroids, resolving in a few weeks, except for Graves' disease and polymyositis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/10428194.2014.914203DOI Listing
September 2014
-->