Publications by authors named "Paola Bin"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Living with the dead: A case report and review of the literature.

J Forensic Leg Med 2019 Feb 7;62:107-111. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

University of Brescia, Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties(,) Radiological Sciences and Public Health, Forensic Medicine Unit, Brescia, Italy.

The discovery of human corpses in urban domestic settings does not constitute an unusual case in criminal casework. These scenarios can be very challenging to investigate since the uninformative evidences encountered also demand a multidisciplinary effort among several specialties in the forensic sciences field. The occurrence of this incident is usually accompanied by social isolation, which is an emblematic aspect of urban modern society. The elderly population is especially susceptible to being socially isolated, which is associated with higher mortality. We present a case report of an elderly woman who had been living with her husband's dead body, contributing to the scarce literature on the "Living with the Dead" phenomenon. The use of a multidisciplinary approach and the challenges that social isolation presents to forensic sciences and the contemporary society are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jflm.2019.02.002DOI Listing
February 2019

Genetic Testing and Professional Responsibility: The Italian Experience.

Open Med (Wars) 2018 24;13:298-300. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research (with the contribution of IRCCS "S. Giovanni di Dio - Fatebenefratelli"), Italy. P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123 Brescia, Italy.

Responsibility means responding to the damaging consequences of technical work and in this binding perspective the general principles of guilt in genetic diagnostics and related activities are not different from any other medical performance. Performing a genetic test however, especially when it has predictive characteristics, offers absolutely peculiar technical deontological issues. It is not and should not be considered as a mere habitual laboratory test but as a complex set of interactions that presupposes adequate information as a valid consensus to formalize absolutely in written form.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2018-0046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110138PMC
August 2018

Genetic Risk in Insurance Field.

Open Med (Wars) 2018 24;13:294-297. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research (with the contribution of IRCCS "S. Giovanni di Dio - Fatebenefratelli"), Italy. P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy.

The risk-delimiting tools available to insurance companies are therefore substantial and it is also possible to argue that a margin of uncertainty is a natural component of the insurance contract. Despite this, businesses look at the potential of predictive medicine, and in particular the growing understanding of genetic mechanisms that support many common diseases. In particular, the rapid development of genetics has led many insurance companies to glimpse in the predictive diagnosis of disease by genetic testing the possibility of extending the calculation of the individual risk of developing a particular disease to appropriate premiums or even denying insurance coverage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2018-0045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6110137PMC
August 2018

Genetic Testing: Ethical Aspects.

Open Med (Wars) 2018 2;13:247-252. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, University of Naples "Federico II", Via Sergio Pansini 5, 80131, Naples, Italy.

The aim of this article is to provide an analysis of the main issues related to the application of predictive medicine by analysing the most significant ethical implications. Genetic medicine is indeed a multidisciplinary matter that covers broad contexts, sometimes transversely. Its extreme complexity, coupled with possible perceived repercussions on an individual's life, involves important issues in the ethical, deontological and legal medical field. The aspects related to the execution of genetic testing have to be addressed at different levels, starting with the correct information about the "cognitive" meaning they intend (by forcefully disassociating it from the strange "preventive aspect") to the legal medical issues that can be aroused in the field of forensic pathology, medical responsibility and insurance. There is no doubt that in recent years, from the decoding of the human genome, genetic research has exponentially expanded with an equally exponential increase in its use in clinical practice and the ethical and social evolution of it.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2018-0038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6034102PMC
July 2018

Piercing and Tattoos in Adolescents: Legal and Medico-legal Implications.

Open Med (Wars) 2018 18;13:148-152. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research (with the contribution of IRCCS "S. Giovanni di Dio - Fatebenefratelli"), P.le Spedali Civili, 1, 25123, Brescia, Italy.

Non-therapeutic body modification interventions are permitted within the limits of the use of one's own body that can be specified in the legal system. The authors take into consideration Italian regulation on tattooing and piercing, in particular in relation to adolescents.

Results: In Italy, several regions have therefore issued acts aimed at regulating the activities of tattoo and piercing also in reference to minors. Discussion. With regard to minors, the rules taken into account set precise limits in relation to the age criterion and subordinate the implementation of such practices to the provision of consent by legal representatives.

Conclusion: If such practices are of an aesthetic nature, we cannot avoid considering the implications they have on health protection, and then adopt appropriate measures to protect the person who intends to undergo them, particularly in the case of minors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2018-0023DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5906624PMC
April 2018

Hypochlorite accident during wndodontic therapy with nerve damage - A case report.

Acta Biomed 2018 03 27;89(1):104-108. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Parma, Italy.

Endodontic therapy is a routinely practised clinical procedure with few reported complications but, as a bleaching agent, inadvertent spillage of sodium hypochlorite beyond the root canal system may result in extensive soft tissue or nerve damage, and even airway compromise. Although very rare, complications arising from hypochlorite extrusion beyond the root apex are described. NaOCl causes oxidation of protein and lipid membrane and causes necrosis, hemolysis and dermal ulcerations (2-4). Neurological complication are very rare. Paraesthesia and anaesthesia may affect the mental, inferior dental and infra-orbital branches of the trigeminal nerve and normal sensation may take many months to  completely resolve (6, 7). Nerve damage (the buccal branch) was described in 2005 by Witton et al. (8) and patients exhibited a loss of the naso-labial groove and a down turning of the angle of the mouth and the motor function was regained after several months. We present a case in which the extrusion of NaOCl solution during endodontic therapy led to important destructive effects on soft tissues and nerves. The arisen medico legal issues are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23750/abm.v89i1.6067DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6357615PMC
March 2018

Plastination: ethical and medico-legal considerations.

Open Med (Wars) 2016 16;11(1):584-586. Epub 2016 Dec 16.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia Italy - Forensic Medicine Institute, 25123 Brescia, Italy.

The international plastination phenomenon has proved to be immensely popular with audiences world-wide. Never before has the human body been exposed to public gaze in such an accessible manner. The exhibitions have perplexed many, included anatomists, some of whom find the display of human bodies unethical. The objective of this study is to review the attention on the use of plastination and exhibition of entire human bodies for non-educational or commercial purposes. The nature of these exhibitions and the uneasy balance between entertainment and education has caused heated debate. The possible legitimacy of the expression of one's will as far as exhibition purposes isn't considered sufficient for the indiscriminate use of a corpse despite the ethical necessity of respecting the wishes of individuals based on respect for the deceased. The informed consent of an individual represents only the most basic and minimal prerequisite for the use of the deceased's body for exhibition purposes, and is absolutely not enough on its own to justify its use in entertainment exhibitions or for the commercialization of the death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2016-0095DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329882PMC
December 2016

Cosmetic surgery: medicolegal considerations.

Open Med (Wars) 2016 12;11(1):327-329. Epub 2016 Aug 12.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia Italy - Forensic Medicine Institute, 25123 Brescia, Italy.

Cosmetic surgery is one of the two branches of plastic surgery. The characteristic of non-necessity of this surgical speciality implies an increased severity in the evaluation of the risk-benefit balance. Therefore, great care must be taken in providing all the information necessary in order to obtain valid consent to the intervention. We analyzed judgments concerning cosmetic surgery found in national legal databases. A document of National Bioethics Committee (CNB) was also analyzed.

Conclusion: The receipt of valid, informed consent is of absolute importance not only to legitimise the medical-surgical act, but it also represents the key element in the question concerning the existence of an obligation to achieve certain results/use of certain methods in the cosmetic surgery.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2016-0044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329831PMC
August 2016

Voluntary termination of pregnancy (medical or surgical abortion): forensic medicine issues.

Open Med (Wars) 2016 13;11(1):321-326. Epub 2016 Aug 13.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research, 25123 Brescia, Italy.

In Italy, Law 194 of 22 May 1978 provides for and regulates the voluntary termination of pregnancy (VTP). Medical abortion became popular nationwide after Mifepristone (RU-486) was authorized for the market by AIFA (Italian Drug Agency) in July 2009. We searched articles in medical literature database with these terms: "medical abortion", "RU486", "surgical abortion". We also searched laws and judgments concerning abortion in national legal databases. Ministerial guidelines were searched on official website of Italian Ministry of Health. We found many medical studies about medical and surgical abortion. We found also ministerial and regional guidelines, which were analyzed. From the point of view of legal medicine, the issues related to abortion with the pharmacological method consist in verifying compatibility and consistency with the safety principles and the parameters imposed by Law n. 194 of 1978, using off-label Misoprostol, what inpatient care should be used and informed consent. The doctor's job is to provide the patient with comprehensive and clear information about how the procedure will be performed, any complications and the time period needed for both procedures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2016-0062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329849PMC
August 2016

Donation of the body for scientific purposes in Italy: ethical and medico-legal considerations.

Open Med (Wars) 2016 2;11(1):316-320. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research, Italy.

In recent years in Italy (and in the other European Countries) a new debated topic involves anatomists and the scientific world: donation of the body after death for scientific purposes. The aim of our analysis is to analyze the issue of voluntary body donation in Italy focusing first of all, on key principles of the disciplines of donation. Considering the rise of exhibitions and events in which death is spectacularized, the debate is focus on will, on respect and overall on the purpose for which the body is donated. Anatomical dissection is considered necessary in the direct learning of the human body, of surgical practices and new scientific techniques but the scarcity of programmes and regulations regarding the donation of bodies for study and research make it an uncommon practice. After discussing what are the constitutional principles underlying the issue we want to emphasize the need of a more effective and updated regulation to set limits and methods of a practice still essential for scientific progress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2016-0060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329847PMC
August 2016

Donation of the body for scientific purposes in Italy: ethical and medico-legal considerations.

Open Med (Wars) 2016 2;11(1):316-320. Epub 2016 Aug 2.

Department of Surgery, Radiology and Public Health, Public Health and Humanities Section, University of Brescia - Centre of Bioethics Research, Italy.

In recent years in Italy (and in the other European Countries) a new debated topic involves anatomists and the scientific world: donation of the body after death for scientific purposes. The aim of our analysis is to analyze the issue of voluntary body donation in Italy focusing first of all, on key principles of the disciplines of donation. Considering the rise of exhibitions and events in which death is spectacularized, the debate is focus on will, on respect and overall on the purpose for which the body is donated. Anatomical dissection is considered necessary in the direct learning of the human body, of surgical practices and new scientific techniques but the scarcity of programmes and regulations regarding the donation of bodies for study and research make it an uncommon practice. After discussing what are the constitutional principles underlying the issue we want to emphasize the need of a more effective and updated regulation to set limits and methods of a practice still essential for scientific progress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/med-2016-0060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5329847PMC
August 2016

Homicide by blunt trauma in Brescia county (northern Italy) between 1982 and 2012.

Am J Forensic Med Pathol 2014 Mar;35(1):62-7

From the Istituto di Medicina Legale, Università degli Studi di Brescia, Brescia, Italy.

Blunt force injuries are produced by a variety of objects, including hands and feet (which is human strength) and many different weapons. Some of these objects produce distinctive patterns of injury of potential evidentiary value. This article presents a series of 53 homicides by blunt trauma along the period from 1982 to 2012, representing 16% of all homicides treated by the University Institute of Forensic Medicine in Brescia (northern Italy). Fifty-seven percent (30 cases) of the victims were male. The mean age of the victims was 47.9 years. The weapon most frequently involved was human strength. Not surprisingly, head trauma was the most common cause of death (66%). Forty-seven percent (25 cases) of the victims survived their assaults for varying periods. Homicides due to blunt trauma are still a relevant challenge for the forensic pathologist, who must obtain a complete and accurate history of the crime (including details regarding the crime scene), interpret patterns of injury and other findings at autopsy, and correlate all of the findings to make an accurate ruling of the cause and manner of death.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PAF.0000000000000080DOI Listing
March 2014