Publications by authors named "Panicz R"

21 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A fast HRMA tool to authenticate eight salmonid species in commercial food products.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Jul 23:112440. Epub 2021 Jul 23.

LAQV-REQUIMTE, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, R. Jorge de Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313, Porto, Portugal. Electronic address:

Atlantic and Pacific salmon are frequently consumed species with very different economic values: farmed Atlantic salmon is cheaper than wild-caught Pacific salmons. Species replacements occur with the high valued Pacific species (Oncorhynchus keta, O. gorbuscha, O. kisutch, O. nerka and O. tshawytscha) substituted by cheaper farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Atlantic salmon by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta). Here we use High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) to identify eight salmonid species. We designed primers to generate short amplicons of 72 and 116 bp from the fish barcode genes CO1 and CYTB. The time of analysis was under 70 min, after DNA extraction. Food processing of Atlantic salmon (fresh, "Bellevue", "gravadlax", frozen and smoked) did not impact the HRMA profiles allowing reliable identification. A blind test was conducted by three different institutes, showing correct species identifications irrespective of the laboratory conducting the analysis. Finally, a total of 82 retail samples from three European countries were analyzed and a low substitution rate of 1.2% was found. The developed tool provides a quick way to investigate salmon fraud and contributes to safeguard consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112440DOI Listing
July 2021

Semi-industrial development of nutritious and healthy seafood dishes from sustainable species.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Jul 19:112431. Epub 2021 Jul 19.

CIIMAR, Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos S/N, 4450-208, Matosinhos, Portugal. Electronic address:

This study aimed to devise innovative, tailor-made, appealing, tasty and semi-industrialized dishes, using sustainable and under-utilized seafood species (bib, common dab, common carp, blue mussel and blue whiting), that can meet the specific nutritional and functional needs of children (8-10-years), pregnant women (20-40-years) and seniors (≥60-years). Hence, contests were organised among cooking schools from 6 European countries and the best recipes/dishes were reformulated, semi-industrially produced and chemically and microbiologically evaluated. The dishes intended for: (i) children and pregnant women had EPA + DHA and I levels that reached the target quantities, supporting the claim as "high in I"; and (ii) seniors were "high in protein" (24.8%-Soup_S and 34.0%-Balls_S of the energy was provided by proteins), "high in vitamin B12", and had Na contents (≤0.4%) below the defined limit. All dishes reached the vitamin D target value. Sausages_C, Roulade_P, Fillet_P and Balls_S had a well-balanced protein/fat ratio. Roulade_P presented the highest n-3 PUFA/n-6 PUFA ratio (3.3), while Sausages_C the lowest SFA/UNS ratio (0.2). Dishes were considered safe based on different parameters (e.g. Hg-T, PBDEs, Escherichia coli). All represent dietary sources contributing to meet the reference intakes of target nutrients (33->100%), providing valuable options to overcome nutritional and functional imbalances of the three groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112431DOI Listing
July 2021

Effects of steaming on health-valuable nutrients from fortified farmed fish: Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) as case studies.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Jun 18;152:112218. Epub 2021 Apr 18.

Aquaculture, Valorization and Bioprospection Division (DivAV), Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P. (IPMA), Lisbon, Portugal; Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

Fish fortification with iodine-rich macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) and Selenium-rich yeast is expected to promote nutritional added value of this crucial food item, contributing to a healthy and balanced diet for consumers. However, it is not known if steaming can affect these nutrient levels in fortified fish. The present study evaluates the effect of steaming on nutrients contents in fortified farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Fortified seabream presented enhanced I, Se and Fe contents, whereas fortified carp presented enhanced I, Se and Zn contents. Steaming resulted in increased I and Se contents in fortified seabream, and increased Fe and Zn levels in fortified carp, with higher elements true retention values (TRVs >90%). The consumption of 150 g of steamed fortified seabream contributes to a significant daily intake (DI) of I (up to 12%) and Se (up to >100%). On the other hand, steamed fortified carp contributes to 19-23% of I DI and 30%-71% of Se DI. These results demonstrate that steaming is a healthy cooking method, maintaining the enhanced nutritional quality of fortified fish. Moreover, the present fortification strategy is a promising solution to develop high-quality farmed fish products to overcome nutritional deficiencies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112218DOI Listing
June 2021

Nutritional value and sensory properties of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fillets enriched with sustainable and natural feed ingredients.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 Jun 14;152:112197. Epub 2021 Apr 14.

Division of Aquaculture, Seafood Upgrading and Bioprospection, Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA), Lisboa, Portugal.

Declines across global fishery stocks forced aquaculture feed manufacturers to search for new and sustainable components. Therefore, the aim of study was assessing nutritional value and sensory properties of meat of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fed for 116 days with two blends. The control feed contained 5% of fishmeal and vegetable oils (rapeseed and soybean) as sole fat sources. While in the experimental diet half of the fishmeal was replaced with a blend of microalgae (Spirulina sp., Chlorella sp.), macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) and vegetable oil was replaced with salmon oil. Proximate composition, energy value, fatty acid profile of meat, nutritional characteristics of fat and protein as well as culinary properties of fillets were assessed. Fillets of carp fed experimental diet had a higher level of protein, lower level of fat and energy value. Intramuscular fat of fish fed with the experimental diet had a better parameters of quality. Protein in the meat of fish from both groups was characterized by a high quality comparing to the protein standard. Our study showed that meat of carp fed with experimental feed enriched with sustainable and natural feed ingredients can be a sensorily attractive source of nutritious ingredients in the human diet.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112197DOI Listing
June 2021

Structural and molecular indices in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) fed n-3 PUFA enriched diet.

Food Chem Toxicol 2021 May 23;151:112146. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Sparos Lda, Área Empresarial de Marim, Lote C, 8700-221, Olhão, Portugal.

Sustainable freshwater aquaculture has been recently gaining attention owing to the potential of nourishing the world. The study aimed to evaluate the influence of finishing diets on the activity of 21 genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and intestinal homeostasis, liver and intestine histology, and the level of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids in common carp fillets. We compared two experimental diets: control diet mimicking a commercial feed (CTRL) and a test diet (CB) fortified with EPA and DHA retrieved from salmon by-products. An additional control (eCTRL) from extensively cultured carps was investigated. The study revealed that the expression of seven hepatic genes, e.g., lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid synthase, and six intestinal genes e.g., claudin-3c and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, was influenced specifically by the experimental diets and farming type. Fish from the eCTRL group had the smallest hepatocytes and the largest nuclei compared with CTRL and CB. No pathological signs were found in intestine samples. Additionally, the levels of EPA and DHA in fillets were significantly higher in fish receiving CB compared with CTRL and eCTRL. The use of fortified diets is a promising solution to produce freshwater species with enhanced nutritional value without compromising the safety of fillets.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2021.112146DOI Listing
May 2021

First detection of Herpesvirus anguillae (AngHV-1) associated with mortalities in farmed giant mottled eel (Anguilla marmorata) in Vietnam.

J Fish Dis 2021 Jun 25;44(6):847-852. Epub 2021 Mar 25.

Aquaculture Research Institute 3, 33 Dang Tat street, Nha Trang city, Vietnam.

Giant mottled eel (Anguilla marmorata) farming in Vietnam is a multistage process starting from wild harvest of glass eels through the so-called "hatcheries" and distribution centres from which individuals are transferred to rearing farms and subsequently sold by one eel farm to another every 3-5 months. The information on viral agents spread and persistence in the Vietnamese eel aquaculture is scarce. Therefore, the mortality of A. marmorata at the Van Xuan Farm was the prerequisite to identify the possible aetiologic agent and additionally to formulate first recommendations for viral disease screening in the Vietnamese eel aquaculture. Juvenile giant mottled eels with haemorrhagic lesions in the skin and liver, and hyperaemia of the gut were tested with qPCR and end-point PCR for AngHV-1 presence. Here, we report the first detection of AngHV-1 associated with mortality in giant mottled eel in winter and spring seasons. On the basis of the obtained results, we recommend to test eel seeds in "hatcheries," since tropical eel farms operate in interconnected scheme and monitoring of AngHV-1 prevalence requires well-implemented measures. Disease screening in the rearing centres and on-growing facilities should be based on everyday health checks, including by-catch fish used as a base of the feeding programmes at eel farms in Vietnam.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfd.13350DOI Listing
June 2021

Spiny-Cheek Crayfish, (Rafinesque, 1817), as an Alternative Food Source.

Animals (Basel) 2020 Dec 30;11(1). Epub 2020 Dec 30.

Department of Aquatic Bioengineering and Aquaculture, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Kazimierza Królewicza Street 4, 71-550 Szczecin, Poland.

The aim of the study was to present a comprehensive characterisation of crayfish meat, which is crucial to assess its potential usefulness in the food industry. To this end, we assessed the yield, basic chemical composition (protein, fat, minerals), nutritional value (amino acid and fatty acid profiles, essential amino acid index (EAAI), chemical score of essential amino acids (CS), hypocholesterolaemic/hypercholesterolaemic ratio (h/H), atherogenicity (AI) and thrombogenicity (TI) indices), as well as culinary value (lab colour, texture, sensory characteristics, structure) of the meat of spiny-cheek crayfish () ( = 226) from Lake Sominko (Poland) harvested in May-September 2017. Crayfish meat, especially that from the abdomen, was shown to have high nutritional parameters. It is lean (0.26% of fat), with a favourable fatty acid profile and a very high quality of fat (PUFA (sum of polyunsaturated fatty acids):SFA (sum of saturated fatty acids), n-6/n-3, h/H, AI, TI) and protein (high CS and EAAI). It is also a better source of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, and Cu than meat from slaughter animals. Hence, crayfish meat can be an alternative to livestock meat in the human diet. Owing to its culinary value (delicateness, weak game flavour, and odour), it meets the requirements of the most demanding consumers, i.e., children and older people.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani11010059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7823787PMC
December 2020

Detection of White Sturgeon Iridovirus (WSIV) in Wild Sturgeons in Poland.

J Vet Res 2020 Sep 16;64(3):363-368. Epub 2020 Sep 16.

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, 17493 Greifswald-Insel Riems, Germany.

Introduction: White sturgeon iridovirus (WSIV) disease is caused by a virus of the eponymous family and is mostly triggered by stressful environmental conditions, . high rearing density, excessive handling, or temporary loss of water. The aim of this study was to develop the most effective diagnostic method for quick and efficient confirmation or exclusion of the presence of WSIV.

Material And Methods: A total of 42 samples (spleen, gills, intestine, skin, kidney, and brain) were collected from eight sturgeon ( and ) aged ≤5+ farmed or caught between 2010 and 2014 in open waters (Dąbie Lake and Szczecin Lagoon). They were tested for WSIV presence using conventional PCR, qPCR, and hybridisation (ISH).

Results: In gross examination, all fish appeared to be healthy. Neither species showed clinical signs typical of WSIV infection. In the majority of cases, fragments of iridoviral DNA were found using molecular methods in the kidneys, and also in the liver, gills, and skin. The detection rate using ISH was 47.37% and most commonly the brain and kidney tissues were positive. The most efficient of the methods used was real-time PCR, with 100% effectiveness in detection of WSIV DNA.

Conclusion: The study demonstrates the capabilities for WSIV diagnosis available to sturgeon farmers and water administrators, indicating useful methods of adequate sensitivity as well as organs to sample in order to achieve the highest probability of viral detection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2478/jvetres-2020-0055DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7497756PMC
September 2020

Validation of Real-time PCR Reference Genes of Muscle Metabolism in Harvested Spiny-Cheek Crayfish () Exposed to Seasonal Variation.

Animals (Basel) 2020 Jul 6;10(7). Epub 2020 Jul 6.

University of Szczecin, Institute of Marine and Environmental Sciences, 18 Adama Mickiewicza Street, 70-383 Szczecin, Poland.

Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is a sensitive and broadly used technique of assessing gene activity. To obtain a reliable result, stably expressed reference genes are essential for normalization of transcripts in various samples. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of reference genes for normalization of RT-qPCR data in spiny-cheek crayfish (). In this study, expression of five candidate reference genes (, ; , glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; , eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5a; elongation factor-1α; and , α-tubulin) in muscle samples from male and female F. limosus in spring and autumn was analyzed. Additionally, the most stable reference genes were used for accurate normalization of five target genes, i.e., troponin c; , arginine kinase; , ferritin; , crustacean calcium-binding protein 23; and skeletal muscle actin 8. Results obtained using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms showed high consistency, and differences in the activity of the selected with genes were successfully identified. The spring and autumn activities of the target genes (except ) in the muscle tissue of males and females differed significantly, showing that both sexes are immensely involved in an array of breeding behaviors in spring, and females intensively recover in the autumn season. Characterization of first reference genes in spiny-cheek crayfish will facilitate more accurate and reliable expression studies in this key species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ani10071140DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7401605PMC
July 2020

New invertebrate species as potential CyHV-3 reservoirs: A case study of common carp mortalities in hyperthermal conditions.

J Fish Dis 2020 Jul 24;43(7):821-824. Epub 2020 May 24.

Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, Department of Aquatic Bioengineering and Aquaculture, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfd.13177DOI Listing
July 2020

A high-quality genetic reference database for European commercial fishes reveals substitution fraud of processed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and common sole (Solea solea) at different steps in the Belgian supply chain.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 Jul 11;141:111417. Epub 2020 May 11.

Flanders Research Institute for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, ILVO, Aquatic Environment and Quality, Ankerstraat 1, B-8400, Oostende, Belgium; Department of Biology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, Building S8, 9000, Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address:

Seafood is an important component of the human diet. With depleting fish stocks and increasing prices, seafood is prone to fraudulent substitution. DNA barcoding has illustrated fraudulent substitution of fishes in retail and restaurants. Whether substitution also occurs in other steps of the supply chain remains largely unknown. DNA barcoding relies on public reference databases for species identification, but these can contain incorrect identifications. The creation of a high quality genetic reference database for 42 European commercially important fishes was initiated containing 145 Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and 152 Cytochrome b (cytB) sequences. This database was used to identify substitution rates of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and common sole (Solea solea) along the fish supply chain in Belgium using DNA barcoding. Three out of 132 cod samples were substituted, in catering (6%), import (5%) and fishmongers (3%). Seven out of the 41 processed sole samples were substituted, in wholesale (100%), food services (50%), retailers (20%) and catering (8%). Results show that substitution of G. morhua and S. solea is not restricted to restaurants, but occurs in other parts of the supply chain, warranting for more stringent controls along the supply chain to increase transparency and trust among consumers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111417DOI Listing
July 2020

Enriched feeds with iodine and selenium from natural and sustainable sources to modulate farmed gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fillets elemental nutritional value.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 Jun 14;140:111330. Epub 2020 Apr 14.

Aquaculture, Valorization and Bioprospective Division (DivAV). Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere, I.P. (IPMA), Lisbon, Portugal; Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), Porto University, Porto, Portugal. Electronic address:

Developing tailor-made fortified farmed fish is a promising solution to overcome nutritional deficiencies and increase consumer confidence in these products. This study evaluated the supplementation of three fortified diets with I-rich seaweed and selenised-yeast on essential and toxic elements levels in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Fortified diets resulted in increased I, Se and Fe in fish muscle. Biofortified seabream and carp revealed lower Cu and Br. The reduction of fishmeal and fish oil in fortified diets resulted in lower Hg and Cd in seabream muscle. Contrarily, fortified diets increased As and Hg in carp fillets. The consumption of 150 g of fortified seabream enabled a significantly higher contribution to the daily recommended intake (DRI) of I (10%) and Se (76%) than non-fortified fish, whereas fortified carp fulfilled 23% of I DRI and 91% of Se DRI. Moreover, the exposure to Pb decreased with the consumption of biofortified seabream (23-82% BMDL) and carp (26-92% BMDL). These results support the strategy of developing eco-innovative biofortified farmed fish using sustainable, natural, safe and high-quality ingredients in feeds, to enable consumers to overcome nutritional deficiencies without significantly increased feed costs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111330DOI Listing
June 2020

Plasma biochemistry, gene expression and liver histomorphology in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) fed with different dietary fat sources.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 Jun 26;140:111300. Epub 2020 Mar 26.

Sparos Lda, Área Empresarial de Marim, Lote C, 8700-221, Olhão, Portugal.

Demand for omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids has become global challenge for aquaculture and different components have been used to increase nutritional value of fillets. The aim of this study was to evaluate influences of feeds on zootechnical parameters, biochemical plasma parameters, expression of lipid-dependent genes, hepatocyte histomorphologies, and fatty acid profiles in common carp fillets. We compared a control diet (CTRL), mimicking a commercial feed formulation for common carp, with three diets containing blends of vegetable oils and a DHA-rich alga (Schizochytrium sp.) included at 3.125% (CB1) or 1.563% (CB2), and 2.1% salmon oil (CB3). The study revealed no differences in final body weight of fish fed CB1-3 diets in comparison with significantly lower CTRL. Concentrations of all biochemical parameters in plasma increased gradually in fish fed CB1-3 diets when compared to CTRL diet, with exception of triacylglycerol levels. Expression of hepatic fas, elovl-5a and pparα genes increased significantly in fish fed CB1 and CB2. Additionally, eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) accumulation in muscle tissue was directly proportional to the amounts supplied in the diets. Our study revealed that carp fillet profiles can be manipulated for DHA and EPA-contents using enriched diets, depending on the source of fat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111300DOI Listing
June 2020

Quality improvement of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) meat fortified with n-3 PUFA.

Food Chem Toxicol 2020 May 17;139:111261. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Sparos Lda, Área Empresarial de Marim, Lote C, 8700-221, Olhão, Portugal.

The effect of carp feeding with n-3 PUFA-enriched feed (Schizochytrium sp. meal or salmon oil) on nutritional quality indicators (proximal composition, fatty acid profile of fat) and culinary quality (color parameters, texture, sensory properties) was evaluated. Highly significant effects of carp nutrition on chemical composition and fat characteristics, L* and a* color parameters, muscle fiber size, endomysium thickness, moisture and taste of fillets were determined. Fillets obtained from carps fed with the experimental feed contained less protein and more crude fat and had larger muscle fibers, but scored more highly in the sensory evaluation of moisture and fishy taste. In the fat of carp fed the enriched feed, a greater share of total PUFA, n-3 PUFA, total EPA and DHA, n-3/n-6 ratio, and a smaller share of total MUFA were observed compared with control fish. However, no effect of nutrition on the texture of carp fillets, assessed either instrumentally or using sensory methods, was found. The use of Schizochytrium sp. meal as a source of EPA and DHA gave much better results than salmon oil, as it allowed a higher content of these valuable fatty acids to be achieved, without compromising quality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2020.111261DOI Listing
May 2020

Genetic diversity in natural populations of noble crayfish ( L.) in north-western Poland on the basis of combined SSR and AFLP data.

PeerJ 2019 29;7:e7301. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Center, Faculty of Biology, University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.

Background: Conservation of noble crayfish () populations is becoming particularly important since the number of individuals is rapidly declining across the distribution range of the species in Europe. Five crayfish populations in northwestern Poland have been constantly monitored for two decades. However, the genetic structure of these populations has not been analysed, although this information is important to devise effective conservation strategies.

Methods: Noble crayfish were collected in the autumn of 2014 by scuba diving in Lakes Graniczne, Babinki, Biwakowe, Sęki and Kwisno, all of which are situated in the Bytów Lakeland of northwestern Poland. Genetic diversity of the five populations was assessed based on allele variability in nine SSR regions and six AFLP primer combinations.

Results: Microsatellite results analysed with AMOVA showed that the diversity between populations corresponds to 18% of total variability, which was confirmed by similar results obtained using AFLP. Additionally, significant genetic diversity was revealed by high average F values. All of the studied crayfish populations significantly deviated from the expected Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium and were characterised by negative values of inbreeding coefficient (F).

Discussion: The invariably negative inbreeding coefficients (F) suggest a low number of mating individuals, a possible consequence of the phenomenon known as genetic bottleneck. However, additional comprehensive analyses are needed to assess the genetic structure, origin and vulnerability of the remaining populations of noble crayfish in the Bytów Lakeland of northwestern Poland, which have high conservation value and are particularly important as a live genetic bank for breeding and restitution purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6673429PMC
July 2019

Detection of Herpesvirus anguillae (AngHV-1) in European eel Anguilla anguilla (L.) originating from northern Poland-assessment of suitability of selected diagnostic methods.

J Fish Dis 2017 Nov 24;40(11):1717-1723. Epub 2017 Aug 24.

Department of Meat Sciences, West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.

The Community Action Plan requests EU member states to implement measures that ensure the recovery of the severely depleted European eel stocks. One of the main threats is posed by Anguillid herpesvirus 1 (AngHV-1) leading to increased mortality in both wild and farmed eels. Following recommendations of the OIE to minimize the risk of obtaining false-negative results, the main aim of the study was to optimize diagnostic methods for AngHV-1 detection using conventional PCR, nested PCR and in situ hybridization assay. While 53.3% of the individual organ samples were tested positive for AngHV-1 by PCR, the additional virus analysis via nested PCR revealed that the actual prevalence was 93.3%. In the cell cultivation passages, a cytopathic effect was hardly found in the first two rounds. In the third passage onto cell cultures, a lytic CPE was detected. The identification and confirmation of the viruses obtained from cell cultures as well as directly from the organ tissues were proceeded by PCR, nested PCR and sequencing of the PCR products. While no positive signal was detectable in the first round by PCR using samples from the third cell culture passages, the nested PCR provided weak but visible positive signals.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jfd.12689DOI Listing
November 2017

Development of the method for identification of selected populations of torpedo scad, Megalaspis cordyla (Linnaeus, 1758), using microsatellite DNA analyses. CELFISH project - Part 4.

Food Chem 2017 Apr 17;221:944-949. Epub 2016 Nov 17.

Department of Aquaculture, Faculty of Food Science and Fisheries, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland. Electronic address:

Catch and consumption of torpedo scad (Megalaspis cordyla) over the western Indian Ocean, but also the western Pacific from Japan to Australia is constantly increasing. Taking into account the degree of exploitation and missing information on the population structure of torpedo scad stocks it is crucial to provide population data. The analysis included individuals obtained in 2012 and 2013 from local markets in Madagascar, Tanzania, Vietnam and Cambodia and after successful DNA extraction fragment of the nuclear rhodopsin gene (RH1) and 9 microsatellite regions (SSRs) were amplified and analysed. Based on the obtained results it was found that there was no 100% overlap between the compared RH1 sequences and those from GenBank. In the case of the studied SSRs, the results allowed the initial characterisation and assessment of the genetic diversity of populations. Moreover, population assignment test distinguished the studied populations into two geographically distant subpopulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2016.11.070DOI Listing
April 2017

Morphological and molecular characterization of adult worms of Leucochloridium paradoxum Carus, 1835 and L. perturbatum Pojmańska, 1969 (Digenea: Leucochloridiidae) from the great tit, Parus major L., 1758 and similarity with the sporocyst stages.

J Helminthol 2014 Dec 10;88(4):506-10. Epub 2013 May 10.

Bird Migration Research Station, University of Gdańsk,Wita Stwosza 59,80-308Gdańsk,Poland.

Unlike the sporocyst stages, adult leucochloridiid digeneans are difficult to differentiate. Sporocyst broodsacs can be identified on the basis of their colour and banding pattern, but in the absence of broodsacs and when experimental infection cannot be performed, tentative morphological identification needs to be verified, and molecular techniques offer a tool to do this. In this study, adult leucochloridiid digeneans were collected from the great tit (Parus major) found dead at three localities at or near the Baltic Sea coast (Hel, Bukowo-Kopań and Szczecin) in northern Poland. On the basis of differences in their morphological characters, Hel specimens were tentatively assigned to Leucochloridium perturbatum, Bukowo-Kopań and Szczecin specimens being identified tentatively as L. paradoxum. Subsequent ribosomal DNA sequence analysis confirmed the identification of these leucochloridiid flukes. Nucleotide sequences discriminating between the two species were identical to those used by earlier authors as characteristic of two distinctly different sporocyst broodsacs representing L. perturbatum and L. paradoxum.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X13000291DOI Listing
December 2014

Digenean communities in the tufted duck [Aythya fuligula (L., 1758)] and greater scaup [A. marila (L., 1761)] wintering in the north-west of Poland.

J Helminthol 2013 Jun 8;87(2):230-9. Epub 2012 Jun 8.

Department of Ecology and Environment Protection, University of Szczecin, Szczecin, Poland.

A total of 124 specimens of the tufted duck, Aythya fuligula, and 63 greater scaup, A. marila, were examined for digenean parasites. Both duck species, which overwinter in a coastal lake connected with the southern Baltic (north-west Poland) were found to support Amblosoma exile, Cyathocotyle prussica, Paracoenogonimus ovatus, Australapatemon minor, Cotylurus cornutus, Echinoparyphium recurvatum, Echinostoma revolutum and Notocotylus attenuatus. In addition, the tufted duck hosted Hypoderaeum conoideum, Bilharziella polonica, Neoeucotyle zakharovi, Renicola mediovitellata, Psilochasmus oxyurus, Psilostomum brevicolle and Cryptocotyle concava; Echinostoma nordiana occurred in the greater scaup only. The two duck species differed significantly in the intensity and abundance of their digenean infection. Aythya marila harboured higher intensity levels and a wider assemblage of digeneans than A. fuligula, and this was likely to be due to differences in the pre-wintering exposure of the duck species to infective stages of these freshwater digeneans. Digenean communities in both duck species, strongly dominated by E. recurvatum, were relatively similar in their structure. No significant sex-dependent differences in digenean infections were revealed, except for the infection with N. attenuatus in A. fuligula. Similarly, there were no significant age-dependent differences (adult versus immature birds) in digenean infections, except for that with N. attenuatus in A. fuligula. The structural similarity between digenean communities in the two duck species is most likely an effect of overlapping diets based on freshwater molluscs, components of the digenean transmission pathway to definitive hosts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022149X12000284DOI Listing
June 2013

Genetic and structural characterization of the growth hormone gene and protein from tench, Tinca tinca.

Fish Physiol Biochem 2012 Dec 2;38(6):1645-1653. Epub 2012 Jun 2.

Department of Immunology, Microbiology and Physiological Chemistry, West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Doktora Judyma 24, 71-466, Szczecin, Poland.

The analysis of the tench growth hormone gene structure revealed a comparable organization of coding and non-coding regions than other from cyprinid species. Based on the performed mRNA and amino acid sequence alignments, gh tench is related to Asian than to European representatives of Cyprinidae family. Second aim of the work was to characterize and predict protein structure of the tench growth hormone. Tinca tinca GH share many common features with human GH molecule. The Tench GH protein binds to the growth hormone receptor (GHR) using two regions I and II that are situated at opposite sites of molecule. Binding site I is placed in the central part of T. tinca GH and H 189 amino acid in the middle region of the IV helix is crucial for GH-GHR interactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10695-012-9661-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3494871PMC
December 2012
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