Publications by authors named "Panagiota Spyromitrou-Xioufi"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effectiveness of probiotics and synbiotics in reducing duration of acute infectious diarrhea in pediatric patients in developed countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Eur J Pediatr 2021 Apr 6. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Department of Pediatrics, Venizeleion General Hospital of Heraklion, 71409, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.

Acute diarrhea is one of the most frequent causes of doctor visits and hospital admissions for children. Our objective was to evaluate the association between probiotics administration and reduction of acute infectious diarrhea duration in children dwelling in developed countries. Bibliographic databases, gray literature, and reference lists were searched up to September 29, 2019. Double-blind, randomized controlled trials that examined probiotics efficacy in children with acute infectious diarrhea residing in developed countries were included. Data were synthesized by generic inverse variance method using fixed- and random-effects model. Twenty trials met the eligibility criteria (n = 3469 patients) and were included in the qualitative synthesis, and 19 studies in meta-analysis. Twelve trials (n = 840) were assessed as high/unclear risk of bias and eight (n = 2629) as low risk of bias. Comparisons revealed a moderate effectiveness of probiotics in low risk of bias studies (MD = - 13.45 h; 95% CI - 24.26, - 2.62; p = 0.02, Bayesian meta-analysis pooled effect MD = - 0.38, 95% CrI - 2.3, 1.58) and a notable effect in studies with high/unclear risk for bias (MD = - 19.70 h; 95% CI - 28.09, - 11.31; p = 0.0004). In trials of optimal methodological quality (n = 1989), probiotics effect was absent (MD = - 3.32 h; 95% CI - 8.78, 2.13, p = 0.23).Conclusion: Outcomes suggest that probiotics do not demonstrate sufficient clinical impact in reducing diarrhea duration in children in the developed countries.Systematic Review Registration: This review is registered at PROSPERO (ID: CRD42020152966). What is Known: • Probiotics, due to the conflicting study results, are administered without adequate evidence as an adjuvant therapeutic agent for eliminating duration of acute infectious diarrhea in pediatric patients. What is New: • In developed countries, probiotics are demonstrated as ineffective in reducing the duration of acute infectious diarrhea in children.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-021-04046-7DOI Listing
April 2021

Miller Fisher Syndrome Triggered by Infections: A Review of the Literature and a Case Report.

J Child Neurol 2021 Feb 11:883073821988428. Epub 2021 Feb 11.

Department of Pediatrics, Venizeleion General Hospital, Crete, Greece.

Aim: We reported a case of Miller Fisher syndrome following a breakthrough varicella zoster virus infection in an otherwise healthy 6-year-old male. The objective of this review was to summarize the infectious etiologic agents known to trigger Miller Fisher syndrome.

Methods: Review of the literature on infections associated with Miller Fisher syndrome.

Results: We identified 762 studies after duplicates were removed. Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened. Finally, 37 studies were included in qualitative synthesis after citations and reference list were checked. The age range of cases reported was 0-78 years, and male sex was predominant in studies where these parameters were reported. The most common causative agent was followed by

Conclusions: Our review highlights the importance of recognizing the infections triggering Miller Fisher syndrome. We also present a unique case of Miller Fisher syndrome associated with breakthrough varicella zoster virus infection. Preventive policies may consider population immunization for certain causative agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0883073821988428DOI Listing
February 2021

Risk factors for meningococcal disease in children and adolescents: a systematic review and META-analysis.

Eur J Pediatr 2020 Jul 13;179(7):1017-1027. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Pediatrics, Venizeleion General Hospital, Crete, Greece.

Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in children worldwide. A systemic review in PubMed and Cochrane Controlled Trials Register was performed for articles on risk factors for IMD in children and adolescents published during a 20-year period (19/09/1998 to 19/09/2018). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established and applied. The data were meta-analyzed using random-effect model and the results were presented on forest plots separately for each risk factor. We identified 12,559 studies (duplicates removed). Titles, abstracts, and full texts were screened and finally, six studies (five case-control and one cohort study) were included in qualitative synthesis, five in meta-analysis. The median age of meningococcal disease (MD) cases was 72.2 months (0-19 years). Household crowding, smoking exposure, close relationships, and recent respiratory tract infections conferred a more than twofold risk for IMD in exposed individuals compared to controls [overcrowded living OR 2.52 (95% CI 1.75-3.63), exposure to smoke OR 2.10 (95% CI 1.00-4.39), kissing OR 2.00 (95% CI: 1.13-3.51), and recent respiratory tract infection OR 3.13 (95% CI 2.02-4.86)]. Attendance of religious events was associated with a decreased risk [0.47 (95% CI, 0.28-0.79)].Conclusion: Our review highlights the importance of individual characteristics as risk factors for IMD in childhood and adolescence. Preventive policies may consider individual as well as social-environmental factors to target individuals at risk.What is Known:• Close relationships, household crowding, and recent respiratory tract infections are major risk factors for IMD.• Passive smoking is a major risk factor for IMD.What is New:• Intimate kissing, household crowding, and passive smoking were found to double the risk of IMD.• Recent respiratory tract infections almost tripled the risk for IMD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-020-03658-9DOI Listing
July 2020