Publications by authors named "Paloma Kalegari"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A hydride transfer complex reprograms NAD metabolism and bypasses senescence.

Mol Cell 2021 09;81(18):3848-3865.e19

CRCHUM, 900 Saint-Denis St, Montréal, QC H2X 0A9, Canada; Département de Biochimie et Médecine Moléculaire, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada. Electronic address:

Metabolic rewiring and redox balance play pivotal roles in cancer. Cellular senescence is a barrier for tumorigenesis circumvented in cancer cells by poorly understood mechanisms. We report a multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms NAD metabolism by transferring reducing equivalents from NADH to NADP. This hydride transfer complex (HTC) is assembled by malate dehydrogenase 1, malic enzyme 1, and cytosolic pyruvate carboxylase. HTC is found in phase-separated bodies in the cytosol of cancer or hypoxic cells and can be assembled in vitro with recombinant proteins. HTC is repressed in senescent cells but induced by p53 inactivation. HTC enzymes are highly expressed in mouse and human prostate cancer models, and their inactivation triggers senescence. Exogenous expression of HTC is sufficient to bypass senescence, rescue cells from complex I inhibitors, and cooperate with oncogenic RAS to transform primary cells. Altogether, we provide evidence for a new multi-enzymatic complex that reprograms metabolism and overcomes cellular senescence.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2021.08.028DOI Listing
September 2021

Phenylethynylbenzyl-modified biguanides inhibit pancreatic cancer tumor growth.

Sci Rep 2021 05 10;11(1):9854. Epub 2021 May 10.

Département de Chimie-Faculté des Arts et des Sciences, Université de Montréal, 2900 Edouard Montpetit, Succursale Centre-Ville, CP 6128, Montreal, QC, H3C3J7, Canada.

We present the design and synthesis of a small library of substituted biguanidium salts and their capacity to inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer cells. We first present their in vitro and membrane activity, before we address their mechanism of action in living cells and in vivo activity. We show that phenylethynyl biguanidium salts possess higher ability to cross hydrophobic barriers, improve mitochondrial accumulation and anticancer activity. Mechanistically, the most active compound, 1b, like metformin, activated AMPK, decreased the NAD/NADH ratio and mitochondrial respiration, but at 800-fold lower concentration. In vivo studies show that compound 1b significantly inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice, while biguanides currently in clinical trials had little activity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-87993-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8110578PMC
May 2021

Ribosomal protein RPL22/eL22 regulates the cell cycle by acting as an inhibitor of the CDK4-cyclin D complex.

Cell Cycle 2019 Mar - Apr;18(6-7):759-770. Epub 2019 Mar 28.

a Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine , Université de Montréal , Montréal , Québec , Canada.

Senescence is a tumor suppressor program characterized by a stable growth arrest while maintaining cell viability. Senescence-associated ribogenesis defects (SARD) have been shown to regulate senescence through the ability of the ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14 or uS11) to bind and inhibit the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4). Here we report another ribosomal protein that binds and inhibits CDK4 in senescent cells: L22 (RPL22 or eL22). Enforcing the expression of RPL22/eL22 is sufficient to induce an RB and p53-dependent cellular senescent phenotype in human fibroblasts. Mechanistically, RPL22/eL22 can interact with and inhibit CDK4-Cyclin D1 to decrease RB phosphorylation both in vitro and in cells. Briefly, we show that ribosome-free RPL22/eL22 causes a cell cycle arrest which could be relevant during situations of nucleolar stress such as cellular senescence or the response to cancer chemotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15384101.2019.1593708DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6464582PMC
April 2020

The senescence-associated secretory phenotype and its regulation.

Cytokine 2019 05 16;117:15-22. Epub 2019 Feb 16.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7, Canada; CRCHUM, 900 Saint-Denis - Room R10.432, Montréal, QC H2X 0A9, Canada. Electronic address:

The senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) defines the ability of senescent cells to express and secrete a variety of extracellular modulators that includes cytokines, chemokines, proteases, growth factors and bioactive lipids. The role of the SASP depends on the context. The SASP reinforces the senescent cell cycle arrest, stimulates the immune-mediated clearance of potentially tumorigenic cells, limits fibrosis and promotes wound healing and tissue regeneration. On the other hand, the SASP can mediate chronic inflammation and stimulate the growth and survival of tumor cells. The regulation of the SASP occurs at multiple levels including chromatin remodelling, activation of specific transcription factors such as C/EBP and NF-κB, control of mRNA translation and intracellular trafficking. Several SASP modulators have already been identified setting the stage for future research on their clinical applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cyto.2019.01.013DOI Listing
May 2019

Circumventing senescence is associated with stem cell properties and metformin sensitivity.

Aging Cell 2019 04 6;18(2):e12889. Epub 2019 Jan 6.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine and CR-CHUM, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

Most cancers arise in old individuals, which also accumulate senescent cells. Cellular senescence can be experimentally induced by expression of oncogenes or telomere shortening during serial passage in culture. In vivo, precursor lesions of several cancer types accumulate senescent cells, which are thought to represent a barrier to malignant progression and a response to the aberrant activation of growth signaling pathways by oncogenes (oncogene toxicity). Here, we sought to define gene expression changes associated with cells that bypass senescence induced by oncogenic RAS. In the context of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), oncogenic KRAS induces benign pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), which exhibit features of oncogene-induced senescence. We found that the bypass of senescence in PanINs leads to malignant PDAC cells characterized by gene signatures of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, and mitochondria. Stem cell properties were similarly acquired in PanIN cells treated with LPS, and in primary fibroblasts and mammary epithelial cells that bypassed Ras-induced senescence after reduction of ERK signaling. Intriguingly, maintenance of cells that circumvented senescence and acquired stem cell properties was blocked by metformin, an inhibitor of complex I of the electron transport chain or depletion of STAT3, a protein required for mitochondrial functions and stemness. Thus, our studies link bypass of senescence in premalignant lesions to loss of differentiation, acquisition of stemness features, and increased reliance on mitochondrial functions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/acel.12889DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6413657PMC
April 2019
-->