Publications by authors named "Paige E Cervantes"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Changes in Attitudes and Knowledge after Trainings in a Clinical Care Pathway for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

J Autism Dev Disord 2020 Nov 17. Epub 2020 Nov 17.

Child Study Center, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU Langone, New York, NY, 10016, USA.

Caring for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be complicated, especially when challenging behaviors are present. Providers may feel unprepared to work with these individuals because specialized training for medical and social service providers is limited. To increase access to specialized training, we modified an effective half-day ASD-Care Pathway training (Kuriakose et al. 2018) and disseminated it within five different settings. This short, focused training on strategies for preventing and reducing challenging behaviors of patients with ASD resulted in significant improvements in staff perceptions of challenging behaviors, increased comfort in working with the ASD population, and increased staff knowledge for evidence-informed practices. Implications, including the impact of sociodemographic characteristics on pre/post changes, and future directions are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04775-yDOI Listing
November 2020

Trends Over a Decade in NIH Funding for Autism Spectrum Disorder Services Research.

J Autism Dev Disord 2020 Oct 10. Epub 2020 Oct 10.

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, USA.

Investments in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research, guided by the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), have focused disproportionately on etiology over a well-established stakeholder priority area: research to improve accessibility and quality of community-based services. This study analyzed National Institutes of Health ASD services research funding from 2008 to 2018 to examine funding patterns, evaluate the impact of IACC objectives, and identify future directions. Approximately 9% of total funds were allocated to services research. This investment remained relatively stable across time and lacked diversity across domains (e.g., area of focus, ages sampled, implementation strategies used). While advancements were observed, including increased prevalence of projects focused on adult samples and on dissemination/implementation and prevention areas, greater investment in service research is critically needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04746-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8035332PMC
October 2020

Staff Perceptions and Implementation Fidelity of an Autism Spectrum Disorder Care Pathway on a Child/Adolescent General Psychiatric Inpatient Service.

J Autism Dev Disord 2021 Jan;51(1):158-168

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Child Study Center, Hassenfeld Children's Hospital at NYU Langone, One Park Avenue, 7th Floor, New York, NY, 10016, USA.

While youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are psychiatrically hospitalized at high rates, general psychiatric settings are not designed to meet their unique needs. Previous evaluations of an ASD-Care Pathway (ASD-CP) on a general psychiatric unit revealed sustained reductions in crisis interventions (intramuscular medication use, holds/restraints; Cervantes et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 49(8):3173-3180, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-019-04029-6 , 2019; Kuriakose et al. in J Autism Dev Disord 48(12):4082-4089, https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3666-y , 2018). The current study investigated staff perceptions of the ASD-CP (N = 30), and examined rates of ASD-CP implementation fidelity in relation to patient outcomes (N = 28). Staff identified visual communication aids and reward strategies as most helpful. The number of days of reward identification early in the inpatient stay was associated with fewer crisis interventions later in a patient's stay.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04509-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8034489PMC
January 2021

Gender Differences and Similarities: Autism Symptomatology and Developmental Functioning in Young Children.

J Autism Dev Disord 2019 Mar;49(3):1219-1231

Child Study Center, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Hassenfeld Children's Hospital, NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, USA.

A growing body of research suggests that symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may present differently in males and females. This study examined gender differences in ASD symptoms and developmental functioning, using the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtism Traits, Part 1 (BISCUIT-Part 1) and the Battelle Developmental Inventory, 2nd Edition (BDI-2), amongst children aged 17-37 months meeting ASD diagnostic criteria (n = 1317). No gender differences were found in regards to overall symptom severity or symptom domains on the BISCUIT-Part 1 when gender groups were matched by cognitive ability. Females with ASD had greater motor deficits and less communication impairment compared to their male counterparts as measured by the BDI-2. Secondary analyses examining item endorsement patterns were also conducted. Implications of the findings are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3819-zDOI Listing
March 2019

An abbreviated scoring algorithm for the baby and infant screen for children with autism traits.

Dev Neurorehabil 2017 Jul 11;20(5):287-293. Epub 2016 Aug 11.

a Department of Psychology , Louisiana State University , Baton Rouge , LA , USA.

Purpose: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) screening is recommended for all children aged 18-24 months. However, healthcare providers may be burdened with the responsibility of conducting these screens in addition to necessary services. Therefore, developing a time-efficient screener with sound psychometric properties is essential.

Methods: This study sought to update the abbreviated scoring algorithm of the Baby and Infant Screen for Children with aUtIsm Traits (BISCUIT) and increase its clinical utility. Six thousand and three children with ASD or atypical development enrolled in an early intervention program participated.

Results: A 6-item algorithm with a cutoff score of 3 was found to be optimal and yielded a sensitivity of 0.960 and a specificity of 0.864.

Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity estimates were similar to that of the complete BISCUIT-Part 1; thus, the 6-item algorithm can reliably differentiate children at-risk for ASD requiring further assessment. The algorithm appears to be a promising tool for early identification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17518423.2016.1211189DOI Listing
July 2017

Autism spectrum disorders: management over the lifespan.

Expert Rev Neurother 2016 11 30;16(11):1301-1310. Epub 2016 Jun 30.

a Department of Psychology , Louisiana State University , Baton Rouge , LA , USA.

Introduction: For the majority of the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population, symptoms begin within the first years of life and associated difficulties continue throughout the lifespan. Currently, the research literature focuses more heavily on problems in childhood. However, given that adulthood accounts for the majority of life, more focus should be placed on evidence-based, lifelong treatment and management strategies for ASD. Areas covered: This paper reviews the topic of lifelong ASD management, primarily emphasizing issues in adolescence and adulthood. Among the topics discussed are timing and methods of treatment across the lifespan, and specific intervention targets that emerge or are more relevant to this older cohort. Expert commentary: Several advances have been made in the treatment of adolescent and adult specific issues. However, research should continue to focus on these areas. Greater focus on coordination of care across disciplines and policy regarding ASD management over the lifespan is also required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14737175.2016.1203255DOI Listing
November 2016

Comorbid Symptomology in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability.

J Autism Dev Disord 2015 Dec;45(12):3961-70

Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 70803, USA.

Evidence-based treatment must begin with the systematic and comprehensive identification of an individual's complete clinical picture. Therefore, screening individuals with intellectual disability (ID) for comorbid disorders is imperative. Because of the frequent overlap between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and ID, the current study explored the effects of co-occurring ASD on the comorbid symptoms exhibited by adults with ID. The study included 307 adults with severe or profound ID separated into two groups: ASD+ID and ID only. The ASD+ID group exhibited significantly more symptomology on eight of the 12 subscales examined including anxiety, mania, schizophrenia, stereotypies/tics, self-injurious behavior, eating disorders, sexual disorders, and impulse control. Further, comparisons of specific symptom endorsements yielded distinct results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2553-zDOI Listing
December 2015

Assessing aggression in persons with autism spectrum disorders: an overview.

Res Dev Disabil 2014 Dec 30;35(12):3269-75. Epub 2014 Aug 30.

Louisiana State University, USA. Electronic address:

Aggression is a commonly co-occurring problem with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Comorbid aggression can be every bit as debilitating as core symptoms of ASD itself. As a result, careful identification of aggression, the context in which it occurs, and factors that maintain the behavior all have important implications for treatment. As a result, researchers have begun to develop methods and measures to assess aggression among persons with ASD. The purpose of this paper was to review measures that have been used to assess aggression among persons with ASD. We located 25 different assessment methods for both children and adults. The current status and future directions of this area of research are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2014.08.004DOI Listing
December 2014

Commonly studied comorbid psychopathologies among persons with autism spectrum disorder.

Res Dev Disabil 2014 May 12;35(5):952-62. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States. Electronic address:

The study of comorbid psychopathology among persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is picking up steam. The purpose of this paper was to review and describe important characteristics of existing studies. Among the current crop of papers, depression, anxiety, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been frequently evaluated. Groups studied have most frequently been children. Persons with ASD and normal intelligence quotient (IQ) scores have been studied more often than individuals with ASD and intellectual disability. Additional characteristics are discussed, and the implications of these data for future developments in the field are reviewed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2014.02.012DOI Listing
May 2014

Comorbid psychopathology rates in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders according to the DSM-IV-TR and the proposed DSM-5.

Dev Neurorehabil 2015 19;18(4):218-23. Epub 2013 Jul 19.

Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University , Baton Rouge, LA , USA.

Objective: To investigate differences in comorbid psychopathology rates between individuals who meet criteria of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) according to DSM-5 or the DSM-IV-TR.

Methods: Comorbid psychopathology was measured using the Autism Spectrum Disorders- Comorbid for Children. 424 individuals between the ages of 2 and 18 years of age; including children who met criteria for an ASD according to the DSM-5, the DSM-IV-TR only, and a control group that did not meet either set of criteria.

Results: Of the ASD participants, 36% would no longer meet criteria according to proposed DSM-5. Comorbidity rates for the ASD groups were significantly different from the control group; however, ASD groups were not significantly different in terms of total comorbid psychopathology.

Conclusion: The results elucidate the need for further research regarding services and treatments for those individuals that will no longer meet criteria for an ASD but still have significant rates of comorbid psychopathology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17518423.2013.790519DOI Listing
February 2016

A comparison of tantrum behavior profiles in children with ASD, ADHD and comorbid ASD and ADHD.

Res Dev Disabil 2013 Sep 11;34(9):2669-75. Epub 2013 Jun 11.

Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States.

The present study was conducted to compare rates of tantrum behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) (n=255), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (n=40) and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD (n=47). Parents/guardians of children aged 3-16 years were surveyed about their children's behaviors using the Autism Spectrum Disorders-Comorbidity for Children (ASD-C-C). Children with ADHD alone differed from children with ASD alone and children with comorbid ASD and ADHD on rates of tantrum behaviors. Examination of individual tantrum behavior items indicated that children with comorbid ASD and ADHD have a more similar symptom presentation to children with ASD than children with ADHD. This study adds to the literature on the presentation of common co-occurring behaviors of ASD when there is comorbid ADHD. The implications of these findings may aid in the assessment and treatment of tantrum behaviors in children with comorbid ASD and ADHD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2013.04.022DOI Listing
September 2013

Rates of comorbid symptoms in children with ASD, ADHD, and comorbid ASD and ADHD.

Res Dev Disabil 2013 Aug 22;34(8):2369-78. Epub 2013 May 22.

Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, United States.

The current diagnostic criteria do not allow co-diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As a result, there has been little research on how these two disorders co-occur in the ASD population. The current study aimed to extend the literature in this area by examining comorbid rates in three different diagnostic groups (ASD, ADHD, and comorbid ASD+ADHD) using the Autism Spectrum Disorders-Comorbidity for Children (ASD-CC). Children with comorbid ASD and ADHD evinced higher rates of comorbid symptoms than children with ASD or ADHD alone. Additionally, children with comorbid ASD and ADHD endorsed more severe comorbid symptoms. Implications regarding these findings are discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2013.04.021DOI Listing
August 2013

Current status of the Matson Evaluation of Drug Side Effects (MEDS).

Res Dev Disabil 2013 May 24;34(5):1849-53. Epub 2013 Mar 24.

Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA.

The Matson Evaluation of Drug Side Effects (MEDS) is currently the best established and most researched measure of drug side effects in the intellectual disability (ID) literature. Initial research was conducted on its psychometric properties such as reliability and validity. More recent research studies have used the measure to determine the interactive effects of severity of drug side effects on adaptive and social behaviors as well as symptoms of commonly medicated psychiatric conditions among persons with ID. Most recently the MEDS has been used to study potential risk factors of psychotropic drugs. The present study was written to review the current status of MEDS research in the broader context of psychotropic drug side effect research in general.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2013.02.030DOI Listing
May 2013

Comparing challenging behavior in children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders according to the DSM-IV-TR and the proposed DSM-5.

Dev Neurorehabil 2013 Dec 11;16(6):375-81. Epub 2013 Mar 11.

Department of Psychology, Louisiana State University , Baton Rouge, LA , USA.

Objective: The aim of the current study is to investigate challenging behavior in children who may no longer meet criteria for an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis according to the proposed fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5).

Method: Children and adolescents (n = 459) were separated into three groups including those who met criteria for ASD according to the DSM-5 criteria (n = 219); those who will no longer qualify for an ASD diagnosis according to the DSM-5 but met criteria according to the DSM-IV-TR (n = 109); and a control group (n = 131). Scores on the Autism Spectrum Disorders - Problem Behaviors for Children (ASD-PB-C) were compared among groups.

Results: The DSM-5 captured a slightly more impaired population in terms of problem behavior.

Conclusion: Implications regarding access to treatment for those no longer meeting criteria need to be taken into consideration in the coming months.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/17518423.2012.760119DOI Listing
December 2013