Publications by authors named "Paige A Green"

18 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Behavioral Research in Cancer Prevention and Control: Emerging Challenges and Opportunities.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 Jul 7. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

Chief, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute.

It is estimated that behaviors such as poor diet, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, sedentary behavior, and excessive ultraviolet exposure account for nearly half of all cancer morbidity and mortality. Accordingly, the behavioral, social, and communication sciences have been important contributors to cancer prevention and control research, with methodological advances and implementation science helping to produce optimally effective interventions. To sustain these contributions, it is vital to adapt to the contemporary context. Efforts must consider ancillary effects of the 2019 coronavirus disease pandemic, profound changes in the information environment and public understanding of and trust in science, renewed attention to structural racism and social determinants of health, and the rapidly increasing population of cancer survivors. Within this context, it is essential to accelerate reductions in tobacco use across all population subgroups; consider new models of energy balance (diet, physical activity, sedentary behavior); increase awareness of alcohol as a risk factor for cancer, and identify better communication practices in the context of cancer-related decisions such as screening and genetic testing. Successful integration of behavioral research and cancer prevention depends on working globally and seamlessly across disciplines, taking a multilevel approach where possible. Methodological and analytic approaches should be emphasized in research training programs and should employ new and underutilized data sources and technologies. As the leadership core of the National Cancer Institute's Behavioral Research Program, we reflect on these challenges and opportunities and consider implications for the next phase of behavioral research in cancer prevention and control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djab139DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8344826PMC
July 2021

Association of objectively measured sleep with frailty and 5-year mortality in community-dwelling older adults.

Sleep 2021 07;44(7)

Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD, USA.

Study Objectives: To determine whether actigraphy-measured sleep was independently associated with risk of frailty and mortality over a 5-year period among older adults.

Methods: We used data from Waves 2 (W2) and 3 (W3) (2010-2015) of the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project, a prospective cohort of community-dwelling older adults born between 1920 and 1947. One-third of W2 respondents were randomly selected to participate in a sleep study, of whom N = 727 consented and N = 615 were included in the analytic sample. Participants were instructed to wear a wrist actigraph for 72 h (2.93 ± 0.01 nights). Actigraphic sleep parameters were averaged across nights and included total sleep time, percent sleep, sleep fragmentation index, and wake after sleep onset. Subjective sleep was collected via questionnaire. Frailty was assessed using modified Fried Frailty Index. Vital status was ascertained at the time of the W3 interview. W3 frailty/mortality status was analyzed jointly with a four-level variable: robust, pre-frail, frail, and deceased. Associations were modeled per 10-unit increase.

Results: After controlling for baseline frailty (robust and pre-frail categories), age, sex, education, body mass index, and sleep time preference, a higher sleep fragmentation index was associated with frailty (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.02-2.84) and mortality (OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.09-4.09). Greater wake after sleep onset (OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02-1.50) and lower percent sleep (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.17-0.97) were associated with mortality.

Conclusions: Among community-dwelling older adults, actigraphic sleep is associated with frailty and all-cause mortality over a 5-year period. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the physiological mechanisms underlying these associations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsab003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8271128PMC
July 2021

Strategies to Prevent or Remediate Cancer and Treatment-Related Aging.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2021 02;113(2):112-122

Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA.

Up to 85% of adult cancer survivors and 99% of adult survivors of childhood cancer live with an accumulation of chronic conditions, frailty, and/or cognitive impairments resulting from cancer and its treatment. Thus, survivors often show an accelerated development of multiple geriatric syndromes and need therapeutic interventions. To advance progress in this area, the National Cancer Institute convened the second of 2 think tanks under the auspices of the Cancer and Accelerated Aging: Advancing Research for Healthy Survivors initiative. Experts assembled to share evidence of promising strategies to prevent, slow, or reverse the aging consequences of cancer and its treatment. The meeting identified research and resource needs, including geroscience-guided clinical trials; comprehensive assessments of functional, cognitive, and psychosocial vulnerabilities to assess and predict age-related outcomes; preclinical and clinical research to determine the optimal dosing for behavioral (eg, diet, exercise) and pharmacologic (eg, senolytic) therapies; health-care delivery research to evaluate the efficacy of integrated cancer care delivery models; optimization of intervention implementation, delivery, and uptake; and patient and provider education on cancer and treatment-related late and long-term adverse effects. Addressing these needs will expand knowledge of aging-related consequences of cancer and cancer treatment and inform strategies to promote healthy aging of cancer survivors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djaa060DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7850536PMC
February 2021

Commentary: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Science of Behavior Change (SOBC).

Health Psychol Rev 2020 03 27;14(1):193-198. Epub 2020 Jan 27.

Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17437199.2020.1716383DOI Listing
March 2020

Multimorbidity: Implications and directions for health psychology and behavioral medicine.

Health Psychol 2019 Sep;38(9):772-782

Cynthia M. Boyd, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University.

The increasing prevalence of multimorbidity in the United States and the rest of the world poses problems for patients and for health care providers, care systems, and policy. After clarifying the difference between comorbidity and multimorbidity, this article describes the challenges that the prevalence of multimorbidity presents for well-being, prevention, and medical treatment. We submit that health psychology and behavioral medicine have an important role to play in meeting these challenges because of the holistic vision of health afforded by the foundational biopsychosocial model. Furthermore, opportunities abound for health psychology/behavioral medicine to study how biological, social and psychological factors influence multimorbidity. This article describes three major areas in which health psychologists can contribute to understanding and treatment of multimorbidity: (a) etiology; (b) prevention and self-management; and (c) clinical care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000762DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6750244PMC
September 2019

Multimorbidity in health psychology and behavioral medicine.

Health Psychol 2019 Sep;38(9):769-771

Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch, Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute.

This special issue highlights the unique potential that health psychology-behavioral medicine has to dramatically contribute to understanding, prevention, and control of the growing prevalence of multimorbidity (i.e., concurrent prevalence of more than 1 chronic health disease or condition in an individual). The 9 articles published here include 8 full, peer-reviewed articles and an invited commentary. Topics include relevance, measurement, mechanisms, and interventions for multimorbidity. Some articles survey relevant empirical literature, detail the representation of multimorbidity in behavioral intervention trials, or present new empirical data, whereas others present guidelines and system-level proposals to improve health care for patients with multiple health conditions. These articles offer proposals, challenges, and future directions for which health psychology-behavioral medicine is admirably suited to contribute to understanding multimorbidity and improving public health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/hea0000783DOI Listing
September 2019

Measuring Aging and Identifying Aging Phenotypes in Cancer Survivors.

J Natl Cancer Inst 2019 12;111(12):1245-1254

Observational data have shown that some cancer survivors develop chronic conditions like frailty, sarcopenia, cardiac dysfunction, and mild cognitive impairment earlier and/or at a greater burden than similarly aged individuals never diagnosed with cancer or exposed to systemic or targeted cancer therapies. In aggregate, cancer- and treatment-related physical, cognitive, and psychosocial late- and long-term morbidities experienced by cancer survivors are hypothesized to represent accelerated or accentuated aging trajectories. However, conceptual, measurement, and methodological challenges have constrained efforts to identify, predict, and mitigate aging-related consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. In July 2018, the National Cancer Institute convened basic, clinical, and translational science experts for a think tank titled "Measuring Aging and Identifying Aging Phenotypes in Cancer Survivors." Through the resulting deliberations, several research and resource needs were identified, including longitudinal studies to examine aging trajectories that include detailed data from before, during, and after cancer treatment; mechanistic studies to elucidate the pathways that lead to the emergence of aging phenotypes in cancer survivors; long-term clinical surveillance to monitor survivors for late-emerging effects; and tools to integrate multiple data sources to inform understanding of how cancer and its therapies contribute to the aging process. Addressing these needs will help expand the evidence base and inform strategies to optimize healthy aging of cancer survivors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djz136DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7962788PMC
December 2019

An Environmental Scan of Biopsychosocial and Clinical Variables in Cohort Studies of Cancer Survivors.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2019 10 17;28(10):1621-1641. Epub 2019 Jul 17.

Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

Background: An inventory of cancer survivorship cohorts is necessary to identify important gaps in what is being studied among cancer survivors.

Methods: We conducted an environmental scan of cancer survivor cohorts to determine the scope and scale of information collected on demographic, biopsychosocial, and selected clinical variables from cancer survivors. Cohorts were eligible for inclusion in the environmental scan if the study was conducted in the United States, reported in English, and consisted of data collected from cancer survivors postdiagnosis and followed for at least 1 year.

Results: Out of the 131 cohorts identified, 62 were eligible. There were 23 cancer sites represented, and more than half of the studies included breast cancer survivors ( = 34). The next most commonly included cancers were leukemia ( = 22) and lymphoma ( = 23). The majority ( = 59) collected information on clinical characteristics and basic diagnostic information, patient demographic characteristics ( = 57), patient-reported symptoms ( = 44), lifestyle ( = 45), and psychologic characteristics ( = 42). Half collected biospecimens ( = 35) and biomarkers ( = 35); fewer collected CAM use ( = 19) and social characteristics ( = 27).

Conclusions: Extensive data are available in cancer cohorts to study important questions relevant to cancer survivors. Cohorts should consider collecting information on social and environmental factors, as well as biospecimen collection and biomarker analyses, and should include survivors from cancer sites less likely to be studied.

Impact: This information can assist researchers in understanding the types of information currently being gathered from cancer survivors for further analysis and identify areas where more research is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-18-0541DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6774809PMC
October 2019

Envisioning Arti's 'Cadillac study' to assess aging trajectories in cancer survivors.

J Geriatr Oncol 2020 03 8;11(2):175-178. Epub 2019 Jul 8.

Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.. Electronic address:

The "Cadillac Study" was the term Arti Hurria, MD often used to articulate her vision of the optimal study to investigate the effects of cancer and its treatments on aging trajectories. In her opinion, this study needed to be designed for near-term clinical translation and have the ability to discern subpopulations of cancer survivors at greatest risk for poor outcomes. The purpose of this commentary is to describe, to the best of our knowledge, Arti's Cadillac Study based on personal conversations, group discussions, and her substantial portfolio of research. We describe the necessary study components of the Cadillac Study and discuss approaches to circumvent perceived barriers. In Arti's honor, our goal is to bring awareness and new perspectives to research on the aging consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to move the field forward.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jgo.2019.06.009DOI Listing
March 2020

Social support, loneliness, eating, and activity among parent-adolescent dyads.

J Behav Med 2019 Dec 15;42(6):1015-1028. Epub 2019 May 15.

Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

We examined associations of social support and loneliness with eating and activity among parent-adolescent dyads (N = 2968) using actor-partner interdependence modeling. Loneliness had several actor associations with health behaviors (adolescents: less physical activity [PA], p < .001, more sedentariness, p < .001; parents: less fruit/vegetable consumption [FVC], p = .029, more hedonic food consumption [HFC], p = .002, and sedentariness, p < .001), but only one dyadic association (adolescent loneliness with less parent FVC, p = .039). Visible support was associated with less HFC, p < .001, and sedentariness, p < .001, but less FVC, p = .008, among adolescents. Invisible support was associated with less HFC, p = .003, but also less PA, p = .028, among adolescents. Both support types were associated with less HFC among parents, p < .001, but invisible support was also associated with less FVC, p = .029, and PA, p = .012, and more sedentariness, p = .013, among parents. When examining health behavior among parents and adolescents, it may be important to consider social support (but perhaps not loneliness) at a dyadic level.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10865-019-00041-4DOI Listing
December 2019

Age differences in everyday stressor-related negative affect: A coordinated analysis.

Psychol Aging 2019 Feb 13;34(1):91-105. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Biobehavioral Health and Medicine.

Advancing age is often characterized by preserved or even enhanced emotion regulation, which is thought to manifest in terms of age-related reductions in the within-person association between stressors and negative affect. Existing research from ecological momentary assessment and end-of-day daily diary studies examining such age-related benefits have yielded mixed results, potentially due to differences in samples, design, and measurement of everyday stressors and negative affect. We conducted a coordinated analysis of 5 ecological momentary assessments and 2 end-of-day daily diary studies to examine adult age differences in the within-person association between everyday stressors and negative affect. Reported stressor occurrences are robustly associated with higher negative affect, regardless of study design and sample characteristics. Across studies, interactions between age and everyday stressors predicting negative affect revealed a pattern of age-related decreases in the stressor-negative affect association, but this interaction was only significant for 2 studies. Further, examination of statistical power of the included studies suggests that, despite differences in the number of repeated assessments, power to detect within-person stressor-negative affect associations is quite good. In contrast, despite possessing wider age ranges, observed age differences were relatively small in magnitude, and studies are potentially underpowered to detect age differences in these within-person associations. We discuss the importance of study design, interval of repeated assessments and number of participants for examining age differences in everyday stressors and negative affect, as well as the virtue of coordinated analyses for detecting consistent direction of associations, but inconsistent patterns of statistical significance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pag0000309DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6367015PMC
February 2019

Early life adversity and health-risk behaviors: proposed psychological and neural mechanisms.

Ann N Y Acad Sci 2018 09 16;1428(1):151-169. Epub 2018 Jul 16.

Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch, Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Early life adversity (ELA) is associated with poorer health in adulthood, an association explained, at least in part, by increased engagement in health-risk behaviors (HRBs). In this review, we make the case that ELA influences brain development in ways that increase the likelihood of engaging in HRBs. We argue that ELA alters neural circuitry underpinning cognitive control as well as emotional processing, including networks involved in processing threat and reward. These neural changes are associated psychologically and behaviorally with heightened emotional reactivity, blunted reward responsivity, poorer emotion regulation, and greater delay discounting. We then demonstrate that these adaptations to ELA are associated with an increased risk of smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, and eating high-fat, high-sugar foods. Furthermore, we explore how HRBs affect the brain in ways that reinforce addiction and further explain clustering of HRBs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6158062PMC
September 2018

Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict Obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures: Psychosocial Domain.

Obesity (Silver Spring) 2018 04;26 Suppl 2:S45-S54

Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Background: Within the Accumulating Data to Optimally Predict obesity Treatment (ADOPT) Core Measures Project, the psychosocial domain addresses how psychosocial processes underlie the influence of obesity treatment strategies on weight loss and weight maintenance. The subgroup for the psychosocial domain identified an initial list of high-priority constructs and measures that ranged from relatively stable characteristics about the person (cognitive function, personality) to dynamic characteristics that may change over time (motivation, affect).

Objectives: This paper describes (a) how the psychosocial domain fits into the broader model of weight loss and weight maintenance as conceptualized by ADOPT; (b) the guiding principles used to select constructs and measures for recommendation; (c) the high-priority constructs recommended for inclusion; (d) domain-specific issues for advancing the science; and (e) recommendations for future research.

Significance: The inclusion of similar measures across trials will help to better identify how psychosocial factors mediate and moderate the weight loss and weight maintenance process, facilitate research into dynamic interactions with factors in the other ADOPT domains, and ultimately improve the design and delivery of effective interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oby.22160DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7055940PMC
April 2018

Emotion suppression, emotional eating, and eating behavior among parent-adolescent dyads.

Emotion 2017 10 3;17(7):1052-1065. Epub 2017 Apr 3.

Cape Fox Facilities Services.

Emotion suppression may lead to ironic increases in emotional experience. More important, suppression is a transactional process, creating stress and disrupting interactions for the suppressor and those in social interactions with individuals who are suppressing emotion. However, no research has examined the behavioral consequences of emotion suppression in close relationships. We examine the possibility that emotion suppression will predict eating behaviors as a secondary emotion regulatory strategy among 1,556 parent-adolescent dyads (N = 3,112), consistent with evidence suggesting that suppression influences eating at the individual-level. Actor-partner interdependence models and structural equation modeling demonstrate that one's own emotion suppression was associated with emotional eating; greater consumption of hedonic-low nutrient, high energy dense-foods; and lower consumption of fruits and vegetables (actor effects). One's partner's emotion suppression was also independently associated with one's own emotional eating; lower consumption of fruits and vegetables; and greater consumption of hedonic foods (partner effects), although this association was most consistent for adolescents' suppression and parents' eating (compared with the converse). These analyses suggest that dyadic emotion regulatory processes have implications on eating behavior. Moreover, analyses suggest that emotion suppression has potential implications on eating behaviors of others within close relationships with a suppressor, consistent with the notion that emotion regulation is a transactional process. These findings suggest that interventions to improve eating habits of parents and their adolescent children should consider dyadic emotion regulatory processes. (PsycINFO Database Record
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000295DOI Listing
October 2017

A Biobehavioral Framework to Address the Emerging Challenge of Multimorbidity.

Psychosom Med 2016 04;78(3):281-9

From the Office of Associate Director (Suls) and Behavioral and the Psychological Sciences Branch, Behavioral Research Program (Green), Division of Cancer Control & Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland; and Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, Department of Medicine (Davidson), Columbia University Medical College, New York, New York.

Multimorbidity, the co-occurrence of multiple physical or psychological illnesses, is prevalent particularly among older adults. The number of Americans with multiple chronic diseases is projected to increase from 57 million in 2000 to 81 million in 2020. However, behavioral medicine and health psychology, while focusing on the co-occurrence of psychological/psychiatric disorders with primary medical morbidities, have historically tended to ignore the co-occurrence of primary medical comorbidities, such as diabetes and cancer, and their biopsychosocial implications. This approach may hinder our ecologically valid understanding of the etiology, prevention, and treatment for individual patients with multimorbidity. In this selective review, we propose a heuristic behavioral framework for the etiology of multimorbidity. More acknowledgment and systematic research on multiple, co-existing disorders in behavioral medicine are consistent with the biopsychosocial model's emphasis on treating the "whole person," which means not considering any single illness, its symptoms, risk factors, or mechanisms, in isolation. As systems analytics, big data, machine learning, and mixed-model trajectory analyses, among others, come online and become more widely available, we may be able to tackle multimorbidity more holistically, efficiently, and satisfactorily.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0000000000000294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4889007PMC
April 2016

Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment.

Nat Rev Cancer 2015 Sep;15(9):563-72

Department of Gynecologic Oncology; and the Department of Cancer Biology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programmes that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and haematopoietic differentiation programmes. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacological strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrc3978DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4828959PMC
September 2015

Cancer and quality of life in spousal dyads: spillover in couples with and without cancer-related health problems.

Support Care Cancer 2016 Feb 5;24(2):763-771. Epub 2015 Jul 5.

National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850, USA.

Purpose: Poor health of one spouse can adversely influence the partner's health outcomes ("spillover"). This study aimed to estimate quality of life spillover among spouses and to determine how presence of cancer influenced these effects.

Methods: We examined data on husband-wife dyads with cancer-related health problems, medical events, or disabilities (n = 910) and matched comparison dyads from the 2004-2012 Medical Expenditures Panel Survey, a population-based survey of the USA. Mental and physical health-related quality of life and depressed mood were reported at two time points (T1 and T2, 11 months apart on average). Dyadic multilevel models evaluated the cross-lagged impact of HRQoL and depressed mood at T1 on spouses' HRQoL at T2, controlling for sociodemographics and health conditions.

Results: Small but statistically significant spillover was observed for mental and physical HRQoL among couples with cancer. Spillover occurred from both the spouse to the survivor and from survivor to spouse. Depressed mood, in particular, showed stronger spillover effects from the spouse to the survivor than the inverse. Similar effects were not observed in dyads without cancer.

Conclusions: Screening for and treating poor HRQoL and depressed mood concurrently in both cancer survivors, and their spouses may positively influence HRQoL outcomes. Future research is needed to further elucidate these findings and determine whether a concurrent approach to psychosocial care in survivors and their spouses may improve long-term outcomes.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4690790PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-015-2840-4DOI Listing
February 2016

Affective science perspectives on cancer control: strategically crafting a mutually beneficial research agenda.

Perspect Psychol Sci 2015 May;10(3):328-45

Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA Department of Psychiatry and the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston.

Cancer control research involves the conduct of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality and improve quality of life. Given the importance of behavior in cancer control, fundamental research is necessary to identify psychological mechanisms underlying cancer risk, prevention, and management behaviors. Cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are often emotionally laden. As such, affective science research to elucidate questions related to the basic phenomenological nature of emotion, stress, and mood is necessary to understand how cancer control can be hindered or facilitated by emotional experiences. To date, the intersection of basic affective science research and cancer control remains largely unexplored. The goal of this article is to outline key questions in the cancer control research domain that provide an ecologically valid context for new affective science discoveries. We also provide examples of ways in which basic affective discoveries could inform future cancer prevention and control research. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive but instead are offered to generate creative thought about the promise of a cancer research context for answering basic affective science questions. Together, these examples provide a compelling argument for fostering collaborations between affective and cancer control scientists.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1745691615576755DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4438787PMC
May 2015
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